Sprüth Magers Berlin London

Where nature runs riot

Cyprien Gaillard

Sprüth Magers Berlin   may 02 - july 16 2015

Opening reception: May 1, 2015

At the core of Cyprien Gaillard’s exhibition Where Nature Runs Riot is Nightlife (2015), a major new film shot at night over the past two years in Cleveland, Los Angeles and Berlin.

Nightlife begins with a shot of a rippling form that looks as if it were carved from the very light of the projection. As the camera pans to the right to reveal a pitted surface of greenish bronze, one of the most iconic sculptures of the twentieth century slowly fills the frame: Rodin’s The Thinker. This particular cast, one of the few overseen by Rodin himself, is in the forecourt of the Cleveland Museum of Art. Dynamited in 1970, the sculpture’s base was shredded and its bulk knocked to the ground, an act attributed to the anti-imperialist group ‘Weather Underground’ – one of their many attacks on public spaces across the US. After debating what to do with the sculpture, the museum decided to reinstall the work in its damaged state. As it slowly encircles the large sculpture, rising from its base and recording every detail, the camera seems to create a new, virtual mould of the work. Gaillard then recasts The Thinker as a projection, a new sculpture composed of light, forcefully underlining the sculptural texture of the 3D film. The three-dimensionality is further carved into the soundtrack, which Gaillard created with a 9-second sample from Alton Ellis’s rocksteady classic Blackman’s Word. First released on the Treasure Isle label in 1969, the song featured the refrain "I was born a loser". Rerecorded for the rival Coxsone label in 1971, the title was changed to Black Man’s Pride and the refrain to "I was born a winner". Gaillard remixed both samples to give a spatial – or sculptural – feel to the music, a gesture that taps into the radical history of the genre. In the early 1970s, reggae and rocksteady tracks were often remixed using filters and basic effects such as reverb and delay, creating an overall sensation of echo. Called ‘dub’, this process created a disorientating experience of sound and a metaphoric space for freedom and change. Nightlife reconfigures two time-based mediums, music and film, into sculpture, creating a palpable illusion of space. But there is an important disjunction between audio and visual: dub effects can be achieved with analogue equipment, whereas the film was produced with highly advanced digital technology. Gaillard infuses Nightlife with anachronism: the soundtrack is a low-fidelity counterpart to the film’s exceptionally high-tech visuals.

Next we see a few trees swaying as if they were dancing to the soundtrack. Nicknamed the Hollywood Juniper, this particular species of tree has been a motif for Gaillard since his Geographical Analogies (2005 – 2011) when he made a series of Polaroids of the evergreen. A native of East Asia and not the least bit ‘Hollywood’, this immigrant tree, with its expressive limbs, has taken the name of a place where it is a foreigner. The palm tree, de facto emblem of LA, is also a transplant that is now considered a water-consuming pest because of the city’s acute drought problems, partially caused by the sheer number of non-native trees. As the film continues, we see different trees and plants in urban backdrops depicted in acts of undulating trance and ecstasy. Nightlife unfolds as a hallucinatory riot of urban botany.

The setting shifts again, to the outskirts of Berlin, with the camera rising above a dark grove of trees into a night sky, where fireworks are bursting into life above the 1936 Olympic stadium. The event is the Pyronale, an international fireworks spectacle that takes place annually at this enduring site of fascist architecture. The camera enters the airspace of the fireworks, moving through the spurts of light and tendrils of smoke, forms that offer ghostly echoes of the trees. The film then returns to Cleveland for its coda. A huge tree, bare branches barely visible at first, is lit from behind with a helicopter searchlight shifting restlessly in the sky. This particular tree, a German oak, is laden with significance: during the 1936 Olympics, the German Olympic committee gave each gold medalist an oak sapling. American Jesse Owens won four gold medals, making a mockery of the Nazi ideology of racial supremacy. Owens planted one of his four saplings at Rhodes High School, where he trained, and where the oak grows to this day, the only one known to have survived.

Outside the Nightlife gallery there is a small sculpture, Ammonite Dub (2015). In the centre of a fossilised ammonite, cut in half to reveal the patterns within, the artist has inserted a turntable needle. The sculpture is encased in a double mirror, creating an illusion of infinitely receding space. Exhibited in the first-floor gallery, a sculpture consisting of two 7” records the artist used to create the soundtrack: Reid/Coxsone (gold connectors) (2015). At the centre of each vinyl the usual plastic 45 adapters have been replaced by two that have been cast in gilded bronze. The tripartite form of the adapter reminded Gaillard of a ‘triskelion’, a symbol used by an array of ancient cultures. The synthesis of contrasting ideas – the mundane and the esoteric, geological time and the whims of history – is a typical gesture of the artist, and finds expression in a new series of double-exposure Polaroids called Sober City (2015). The unifying element in each of the Polaroids is a large amethyst crystal in the Natural History Museum, New York. Gaillard exposes the delicate Polaroid film to this crystalline form before exposing it again to a nondescript urban setting (or vice versa), crystallising the landscape and condensing different geographical locations into a single object.

Cyprien Gaillard was born in Paris and lives and works in Berlin and New York. He has had solo exhibitions at a number of major institutions, including MoMA PS1, New York, Hammer Museum, Los Angeles, KW Institute for Contemporary Art Kunst-Werke Berlin e.V., Centre Georges Pompidou, Paris, and Kunsthalle Basel, Switzerland.

Sprüth Magers Berlin is concurrently presenting the solo exhibition The Symmetry Argument by Marcel van Eeden. For more information and press enquiries, please contact Silvia Baltschun (sb@spruethmagers.com).
Opening Times of the Gallery: Tue – Sat, 11 am – 6 pm.


The artist would like to thank Relativity Media for their generous support during the production of Nightlife:

Jason Beckman
Tucker Tooley
Ken Halsband
David Stump, ASC
Jay Spencer

Special thanks also to Tom Poole from Company 3 and Namit Malhotra and the Prime Focus stereo conversion team.

Where nature runs riot

Sprüth Magers Berlin   may 02 - july 16 2015

Opening reception: May 1, 2015

Cyprien Gaillards neuer Film Nightlife (2015) steht im Zentrum seiner Ausstellung Where Nature Runs Riot. Nightlife entstand über die letzten zwei Jahre in Cleveland, Los Angeles und Berlin und wurde ausschließlich bei Nacht gedreht.
Der Film beginnt mit einer Einstellung auf ein metallisch schimmerndes, voluminöses Objekt, welches aus einem dunklen Hintergrund durch das Licht der Projektion erwächst. Die Kamera beginnt die grünlich patinierte Bronze zu umrunden. Langsam rückt eine Ikone der Bildhauerei des 20. Jahrhunderts ins Bild: Der Denker von Auguste Rodin. Dieser Abguss ist einer der wenigen, die unter Rodins Aufsicht gefertigt wurden – er steht vor dem Cleveland Museum of Art. 1970 fiel sie einem Sprengstoffanschlag zum Opfer, der den Sockel zerstörte und die Skulptur umstürzte. Dieser Akt wird der anti-imperialistischen Organisation Weather Underground zugeschrieben und war einer der vielen, über das gesamte Staatsgebiet der USA verteilten Angriffe der Gruppe im öffentlichen Raum. Das Museum entschied, das Werk unverändert, in seinem beschädigten Zustand, wieder aufzustellen. Indem die Kamera die Skulptur langsam umkreist und vom Sockel aufsteigend jedes Detail registriert, scheint sie eine neue, virtuelle Gussform des Werks zu schaffen. So formt Gaillard den Denker als Projektion nach, er schafft eine virtuelle Skulptur aus Licht, indem er die plastische Textur des 3D-Films nutzt. Diese Dreidimensionalität wird zudem durch die Tonspur von Nightlife reflektiert. Gaillard hat ein neun-sekündiges Sample von Alton Ellis' Rocksteady-Klassiker „Blackman's Word“ als Grundlage für den Soundtrack verwandt. Der Song erschien zuerst 1969 auf dem Label Treasure Isle. Der Refrain lautet „I was born a loser“. 1971 wurde das Stück für das rivalisierende Coxson-Label erneut aufgenommen. Der Titel wurde in „Black Man's Pride“ und die Refrain-Zeile in „I was born a winner" geändert. Gaillard hat beide Samples neu abgemischt, und zwar so, dass die Musik eine räumliche, fast skulpturale Dimension annimmt. Mit dieser Geste schließt er an die radikale Geschichte des Musikgenres an. In den frühen 1970er Jahren wurden viele Reggae- und Rocksteady-Stücke unter Einsatz von Filtern und einfachen Effekten wie Hall und Delay neu gemischt, was die nunmehr neuen Stücke, wie ein alles erfassendes Echo wirken ließ.
Dieses „Dub“ genannte Verfahren entzog sich den Klanggewohnheiten dieser Zeit und schuf einen metaphorischen Raum für Umwälzung und Freiheit. Nightlife rekonfiguriert die zwei zeitbasierten Medien Musik und Film zu einer Skulptur und schafft eine physisch erfahrbare Illusion im Raum. Es gibt jedoch einen wichtigen Unterschied zwischen Ton- und Bildebene: Dub-Effekte können mit analogen Geräten erzielt werden, der Film hingegen wurde unter Einsatz digitaler Spitzentechnologie hergestellt. Nightlife ist von einem vielschichtigen Anachronismus durchzogen: Das „Low Fidelity“ der Tonspur wird zum Gegenmoment der „Hightech“ Visualität des Films.

Die nächste Einstellung zeigt Bäume, die sich im Wind wiegen, als bewegten sie sich zur Musik des Films. Die „Hollywood Juniper“ genannte Baumart ist in dem Werk von Gaillard ein durchgängiges Motiv und taucht bereits in der Serie Geographical Analogies (2005 – 2011) auf, für die er jeweils neun Polaroid-Fotografien von unterschiedlichen, signifikanten Landschaften und urbanen Lebensräumen in Bezug zueinander gestellt hat. Jener Baum stammt ursprünglich aus Ost-Asien und keineswegs aus Hollywood. Er ist ein Immigrant, der mit seinen ausdrucksstarken Ästen den Namen eines Ortes angenommen hat, an dem er ein Fremder ist. Ähnlich verhält es sich mit dem faktischen Wahrzeichen von Los Angeles, der Palme. Auch sie stellt eine Verpflanzung dar, die heutzutage als Wasser verschwendende Plage gilt, angesichts akuter Dürreprobleme der Stadt, die nicht zuletzt von der großen Anzahl nicht-einheimischer Bäume verursacht werden. Im Verlauf des Films sehen wir verschiedene Pflanzen und Bäume vor urbanem Hintergrund, aufgenommen in Bewegungen wogender Trance und Ekstase. Nightlife erscheint wie ein surrealer Aufstand städtischer Botanik.

Der Schauplatz ändert sich erneut und wechselt zu einem Außenbezirk von Berlin. Die Kamera erhebt sich aus einem dunklen Wäldchen in den Nachthimmel, ein Feuerwerk explodiert über dem 1936 erbauten Olympia-Stadion. Die Pyronale, ein internationales Feuerwerk-Spektakel, findet jedes Jahr an dieser Stätte faschistischer Architektur statt. Die Kamera steigt hinauf in den Luftraum des Feuerwerks, durch seine Lichtstrahlen und an Tentakel erinnernde Rauchfahnen hindurch – Formen, die wie ein geisterhaftes Echo der zuvor gesehenen Bäume wirken.

In seiner Coda kehrt der Film nach Cleveland zurück. Ein riesiger Baum – seine nackten Äste sind zunächst kaum zu erkennen – wird von hinten angestrahlt, vom Suchlicht eines Helikopters, das beharrlich den Himmel abtastet. Diese deutsche Eiche ist ein besonderer, mit Bedeutung aufgeladener Baum: Während der Olympischen Spiele 1936 überreichte das Deutsche Olympische Komitee jedem Goldmedaillengewinner einen Eichensetzling. Der Amerikaner Jesse Owens gewann viermal Gold, eine Verhöhnung der rassistischen Nazi-Ideologie. Einen seiner vier Setzlinge pflanzte Owens in der Rhodes High School, wo er für die Olympiade trainierte. Dort steht die Eiche bis zum heutigen Tag. Sie ist die einzige, die überlebt haben soll.

Als Eingangsmotiv zu Nightlife ist im Gartensaal die Skulptur Ammonite Dub (2015) zu sehen. In der Mitte eines versteinerten Ammoniten, der in zwei Hälften geschnitten wurde, um seine inneren Muster und Strukturen sichtbar zu machen, hat der Künstler eine Plattenspielernadel platziert. Die Skulptur ist eingefasst von zwei Spiegeln, so dass sich die Illusion eines sich bis in die Unendlichkeit zurückziehenden Raumes ergibt.

Im ersten Stock der Galerie befindet sich eine Skulptur, die aus jenen zwei Single-Schallplatten besteht, die der Künstler für die Tonspur von Nightlife verwendet hat. Die Arbeit trägt den Titel Reid/Coxsone (gold connectors) (2015). In der Mitte beider Platten wurde der herkömmliche sternförmige Mittelloch-Adapter aus Plastik durch zwei in vergoldete Bronze gegossene Exemplare ersetzt. Die dreigeteilte Form dieser Stern-Adapter hat den Künstler an die Triskele erinnert, ein Symbol, das in einer Vielzahl alter Kulturen vorkommt. Das Zusammenführen kontrastierender Elemente – Weltliches mit Esoterischem, Zeitmaße der Geologie mit den Unwägbarkeiten der Geschichte – ist eine typische Vorgehensweise des Künstlers. Sie findet ihren Ausdruck auch in einer neuen Serie doppelbelichteter Polaroids mit dem Titel Sober City (2015). Das verbindende Motiv auf jedem dieser Polaroids ist ein Amethyst aus dem Naturkundemuseum in New York. Gaillard belichtet die empfindliche Polaroid-Filmschicht einmal mit dem Motiv dieser kristallinen Form, und wiederholt dann den Belichtungsvorgang mit Stadtansichten. Auf diese Weise wird städtische Landschaft kristallisiert, und verschiedene Orte der Menschheitsgeschichte verdichten sich in einem einzelnen Objekt.

Cyprien Gaillard, geboren in Paris, lebt und arbeitet in Berlin und New York. Seine Arbeiten waren in Einzelausstellungen großer Institutionen zu sehen, darunter das MoMA PS1 (New York), das Hammer Museum (Los Angeles), die KW Institute for Contemporary Art Kunst-Werke Berlin e.V. (Berlin), im Centre Pompidou (Paris) und der Kunsthalle Basel.

Sprüth Magers Berlin zeigt zeitgleich die Einzelausstellung The Symmetry Argument von Marcel van Eeden. Für weitere Informationen sowie Presseanfragen wenden Sie sich bitte an Silvia Baltschun (sb@spruethmagers.com).
Öffnungszeiten der Galerie: Dienstag – Samstag, 11 – 18 Uhr.


Für die großzügige Unterstützung bei der Produktion von Nightlife durch Relativity Media bedankt sich der Künstler bei:

Jason Beckman
Tucker Tooley
Ken Halsband
David Stump, ASC
Jay Spencer

Besonderer Dank gilt Tom Poole von Company 3 sowie
Namit Malhotra und dem gesamten Stereo-Konvertierung-Team bei Prime Focus.