Rosemarie Trockel

Rosemarie Trockel
Milieu, 2022

Learn more
Rosemarie Trockel

Rosemarie Trockel
Treasure of the Sierra Madre, 2002

Learn more
Rosemarie Trockel

Rosemarie Trockel
Pot 5, 2006

Learn more
John Baldessari

John Baldessari
Commissioned Painting: A Painting by Patrick X. Nidorf O.S.A., 1969

Learn more
George Condo

George Condo
Multicolored Diagonal Figure Composition, 2023

Learn more
Andreas Gursky

Andreas Gursky
Karlsruhe, Siemens, 1991

Learn more
Jenny Holzer

Jenny Holzer
fake news and lies, 2023

Learn more
Jenny Holzer

Jenny Holzer
White Purple Curve, 2005

Learn more
Anne Imhof

Anne Imhof
Suicidal Tendencies (Goya), 2024

Learn more
Barbara Kruger

Barbara Kruger
Untitled (Fame and fortune), 2024

Learn more
Kara Walker

Kara Walker
Colored Landscape with Negro Rückenfigur, 2024

Learn more
Kara Walker

Kara Walker
Petechiae and Purpura in the Underworld, 2024

Learn more
Louise Lawler

Louise Lawler
Three Flags (swiped again, two), 2022

Learn more
Louise Lawler

Louise Lawler
Pedestal, 2008/2010

Learn more
Louise Lawler

Louise Lawler
Souvenir for Eau de Cologne, Hong Kong, 1999/2015/2019

Learn more
Salvo

Salvo
Alba 2000, 2002

Learn more
Peter Fischli David Weiss

Peter Fischli David Weiss
Indigenous Forest Floor and Still no one knows it just the same, that Rumpelstiltskin is my name from Suddenly this Overview, 1981–2012

Learn more
Hyun-Sook Song

Hyun-Sook Song
5 Brushstrokes I, 2023

Learn more
Reinhard Mucha

Reinhard Mucha
Achern
, 2024

Learn more
Michail Pirgelis

Michail Pirgelis
A the Giant III, 2024

Learn more
Andreas Schulze

Andreas Schulze
Untitled (At home), 2024

Learn more
Andreas Schulze

Andreas Schulze
Untitled (Volume 2), 2024

Learn more
Andreas Schulze

Andreas Schulze
Untitled (Window Café Wien), 2023

Learn more
Analia Saban

Analia Saban
Woven Horizontal Gradient as Weft (Top to Bottom, Blue Values), 2024

Learn more
Henni Alftan

Henni Alftan
Band-Aid, 2024

Learn more
David Ostrowski

David Ostrowski
The Moral Life, 2024

Learn more
Thea Djordjadze

Thea Djordjadze
Untitled, 2024

Learn more
Nora Turato

Nora Turato
and now… ME!!!!!!!, 2024

Learn more
Thomas Scheibitz

Thomas Scheibitz
Window, 2024

Learn more
Pamela Rosenkranz

Pamela Rosenkranz
Healer Scrolls (Pine Woods), 2024

Learn more
Astrid Klein

Astrid Klein
Untitled (la tentation le plus dangereuse…), 1979

Learn more
image/svg+xml
<p><b>Rosemarie Trockel<br />
</b><i>Milieu</i>, 2022</p>
<p><b>Rosemarie Trockel<br />
</b><i>Milieu</i>, 2022<br />
Nickel silver cast, waxed<br />
61 x 48.5 x 11.5 cm | 24 x 19 x 4 1/2 inches<br />
Edition of 2</p>
<p><b>Rosemarie Trockel<br />
</b><i>Milieu</i>, 2022<br />
Nickel silver cast, waxed<br />
61 x 48.5 x 11.5 cm | 24 x 19 x 4 1/2 inches<br />
Edition of 2</p>
<p><b>Rosemarie Trockel<br />
</b><i>Milieu</i>, 2022<br />
Nickel silver cast, waxed<br />
61 x 48.5 x 11.5 cm | 24 x 19 x 4 1/2 inches<br />
Edition of 2</p>
<p><b>Rosemarie Trockel<br />
</b><i>Milieu</i>, 2022<br />
Nickel silver cast, waxed<br />
61 x 48.5 x 11.5 cm | 24 x 19 x 4 1/2 inches<br />
Edition of 2</p>
<p><b>Rosemarie Trockel<br />
</b><i>Milieu</i>, 2022<br />
Nickel silver cast, waxed<br />
61 x 48.5 x 11.5 cm | 24 x 19 x 4 1/2 inches<br />
Edition of 2</p>
<p><b>Rosemarie Trockel<br />
</b><i>Milieu</i>, 2022<br />
Nickel silver cast, waxed<br />
61 x 48.5 x 11.5 cm | 24 x 19 x 4 1/2 inches<br />
Edition of 2</p>
<p><b>Rosemarie Trockel<br />
</b><i>Milieu</i>, 2022<br />
Nickel silver cast, waxed<br />
61 x 48.5 x 11.5 cm | 24 x 19 x 4 1/2 inches<br />
Edition of 2</p>

Rosemarie Trockel
Milieu, 2022
Nickel silver cast, waxed
61 x 48.5 x 11.5 cm | 24 x 19 x 4 1/2 inches
Edition of 2

Rosemarie Trockel
Milieu, 2022
Nickel silver cast, waxed


61 x 48.5 x 11.5 cm | 24 x 19 x 4 1/2 inches
Edition of 2

Rosemarie Trockel’s Milieu (2022), is a significant addition to her series of works exploring the motif of windows. In Milieu, Trockel references Marcel Duchamp’s iconic Fresh Widow, drawing a conceptual bridge between past and present and serving as a touchstone for Trockel’s exploration of perception, transparency, and the boundaries between inside and outside. Trockel’s choice of materials – nickel silver and wax – imbues Milieu with a distinct texture and presence, contrasting the more traditional ceramics in the series and highlighting the fluidity and variability of the window as a symbol, emphasizing its role as both a barrier and a portal. The windows are deliberately covered, preventing any view through them, and thereby intensifying this sense of separation.

Read more

Through Milieu, Trockel continues her investigation into the intersection of craft, gender, and cultural norms, challenging viewers to reconsider their perceptions and the spaces they inhabit. The window, as reimagined by Trockel, becomes a dynamic site of contemplation, echoing the timeless dialogue between reality and illusion in art.

Rosemarie Trockel (*1952, Schwerte, Germany) lives and works in Berlin. Solo exhibitions include MMK – Museum für Moderne Kunst, Frankfurt am Main (2022–23), Moderna Museet Malmö (2018–19), Pinacoteca Giovanni e Marella Agnelli in Turin (2016), Kunsthaus Bregenz (2015), traveling exhibition at Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofía, Madrid, at the New Museum, New York and Serpentine Gallery, London (2012–13) and Wiels Brussels, Culturegest Lisboa, Lisbon and Museion Bozen, Bolzano (2012–13). Her 2005 retrospective Post-Menopause took place at Museum Ludwig Köln, Cologne and MAXXI, Rome. In 1999, she became the first female artist to represent Germany at the Venice Biennial. Her work was included in Documenta X (1997) and Documenta 13 (2012) in Kassel and the 59th International Art Exhibition – La Biennale di Venezia (2022).

<p><b>Rosemarie Trockel<br />
</b><i>Treasure of the Sierra Madre</i>, 2002</p>
<p><b>Rosemarie Trockel<br />
</b><i>Treasure of the Sierra Madre</i>, 2002<br />
Alu-Dibond, brown spray paint (77 pieces)<br />
274 × 371.5 × 6.5 cm | 107 7/8 × 146 1/4 × 2 5/8 inches</p>
<p><b>Rosemarie Trockel<br />
</b><i>Treasure of the Sierra Madre</i>, 2002<br />
Alu-Dibond, brown spray paint (77 pieces)<br />
274 × 371.5 × 6.5 cm | 107 7/8 × 146 1/4 × 2 5/8 inches</p>
<p><b>Rosemarie Trockel<br />
</b><i>Treasure of the Sierra Madre</i>, 2002<br />
Alu-Dibond, brown spray paint (77 pieces)<br />
274 × 371.5 × 6.5 cm | 107 7/8 × 146 1/4 × 2 5/8 inches</p>
<p><b>Rosemarie Trockel<br />
</b><i>Treasure of the Sierra Madre</i>, 2002<br />
Alu-Dibond, brown spray paint (77 pieces)<br />
274 × 371.5 × 6.5 cm | 107 7/8 × 146 1/4 × 2 5/8 inches</p>
<p><b>Rosemarie Trockel<br />
</b><i>Treasure of the Sierra Madre</i>, 2002<br />
Alu-Dibond, brown spray paint (77 pieces)<br />
274 × 371.5 × 6.5 cm | 107 7/8 × 146 1/4 × 2 5/8 inches</p>
<p><b>Rosemarie Trockel<br />
</b><i>Treasure of the Sierra Madre</i>, 2002<br />
Alu-Dibond, brown spray paint (77 pieces)<br />
274 × 371.5 × 6.5 cm | 107 7/8 × 146 1/4 × 2 5/8 inches</p>
<p><b>Rosemarie Trockel<br />
</b><i>Treasure of the Sierra Madre</i>, 2002<br />
Alu-Dibond, brown spray paint (77 pieces)<br />
274 × 371.5 × 6.5 cm | 107 7/8 × 146 1/4 × 2 5/8 inches</p>
<p><b>Rosemarie Trockel<br />
</b><i>Treasure of the Sierra Madre</i>, 2002<br />
Alu-Dibond, brown spray paint (77 pieces)<br />
274 × 371.5 × 6.5 cm | 107 7/8 × 146 1/4 × 2 5/8 inches</p>

Rosemarie Trockel
Treasure of the Sierra Madre, 2002
Alu-Dibond, brown spray paint (77 pieces)
274 × 371.5 × 6.5 cm | 107 7/8 × 146 1/4 × 2 5/8 inches

Rosemarie Trockel
Treasure of the Sierra Madre, 2002
Alu-Dibond, brown spray paint (77 pieces)


274 × 371.5 × 6.5 cm | 107 7/8 × 146 1/4 × 2 5/8 inches

Trockel is renowned for her thought-provoking work that explores and challenges traditional notions of femininity, culture, and artistic production. Trockel’s Treasure of the Sierra Madre (2002) is a seminal piece within her acclaimed Moving Walls series, which debuted at the Dia Center for the Arts the same year. This innovative work exemplifies Trockel’s unique approach to spatial dynamics and perceptual fluidity. The work features multiple components suspended freely, creating the impression of a floating wall. These elements are not fixed but instead are allowed to move, resulting in a constantly shifting perception of the artwork. This dynamic interplay invites viewers to engage with the piece from various angles and distances, offering a continually evolving experience that challenges traditional notions of stability and permanence in art.

Read more

Trockel’s Treasure of the Sierra Madre captivates with its ability to transform space and perception, embodying the fluidity and transience that are central to the Moving Walls series.

Rosemarie Trockel (*1952, Schwerte, Germany) lives and works in Berlin. Solo exhibitions include MMK – Museum für Moderne Kunst, Frankfurt am Main (2022–23), Moderna Museet Malmö (2018–19), Pinacoteca Giovanni e Marella Agnelli in Turin (2016), Kunsthaus Bregenz (2015), traveling exhibition at Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofía, Madrid, at the New Museum, New York and Serpentine Gallery, London (2012–13) and Wiels Brussels, Culturegest Lisboa, Lisbon and Museion Bozen, Bolzano (2012–13). Her 2005 retrospective Post-Menopause took place at Museum Ludwig Köln, Cologne and MAXXI, Rome. In 1999, she became the first female artist to represent Germany at the Venice Biennial. Her work was included in Documenta X (1997) and Documenta 13 (2012) in Kassel and the 59th International Art Exhibition – La Biennale di Venezia (2022).

<p><b>Rosemarie Trockel<br />
</b><i>Pot 5</i>, 2006</p>
<p><b>Rosemarie Trockel<br />
</b><i>Pot 5</i>, 2006<br />
Ceramic, platinum glazed<br />
30 × 36 × 27 cm | 11 7/8 × 14 1/8 × 10 5/8 inches</p>
<p><b>Rosemarie Trockel<br />
</b><i>Pot 5</i>, 2006<br />
Ceramic, platinum glazed<br />
30 × 36 × 27 cm | 11 7/8 × 14 1/8 × 10 5/8 inches</p>
<p><b>Rosemarie Trockel<br />
</b><i>Pot 5</i>, 2006<br />
Ceramic, platinum glazed<br />
30 × 36 × 27 cm | 11 7/8 × 14 1/8 × 10 5/8 inches</p>
<p><b>Rosemarie Trockel<br />
</b><i>Pot 5</i>, 2006<br />
Ceramic, platinum glazed<br />
30 × 36 × 27 cm | 11 7/8 × 14 1/8 × 10 5/8 inches</p>
<p><b>Rosemarie Trockel<br />
</b><i>Pot 5</i>, 2006<br />
Ceramic, platinum glazed<br />
30 × 36 × 27 cm | 11 7/8 × 14 1/8 × 10 5/8 inches</p>
<p><b>Rosemarie Trockel<br />
</b><i>Pot 5</i>, 2006<br />
Ceramic, platinum glazed<br />
30 × 36 × 27 cm | 11 7/8 × 14 1/8 × 10 5/8 inches</p>
<p><b>Rosemarie Trockel<br />
</b><i>Pot 5</i>, 2006<br />
Ceramic, platinum glazed<br />
30 × 36 × 27 cm | 11 7/8 × 14 1/8 × 10 5/8 inches</p>

Rosemarie Trockel
Pot 5, 2006
Ceramic, platinum glazed
30 × 36 × 27 cm | 11 7/8 × 14 1/8 × 10 5/8 inches

Rosemarie Trockel
Pot 5, 2006
Ceramic, platinum glazed


30 × 36 × 27 cm | 11 7/8 × 14 1/8 × 10 5/8 inches

Rosemarie Trockel is one of the most influential conceptual artists of our time. The first female artist to represent Germany at the Venice Biennial, Trockel continues to challenge traditional notions of femininity, culture and artistic production. Since 2000, Trockel has created an extensive ceramic oeuvre, wielding clay as the material of high art. Playing with a web of cultural and social associations, addressing and subverting inherent contradictions, Trockel arrives at a diverse range of pieces, from ceramic tiles and wall pieces to body parts such as an abdomen and legs, or, in this case, a vessel. The platinum-glazed cylindrical Pot 5 (2006) is titled after the cooking utensil, refers to pottery’s ancient cultural significance, and alludes to containers as symbols for the feminine.

Read more

Rosemarie Trockel (*1952, Schwerte, Germany) lives and works in Berlin. Solo exhibitions include MMK – Museum für Moderne Kunst, Frankfurt am Main (2022–23), Moderna Museet Malmö (2018–19), Pinacoteca Giovanni e Marella Agnelli in Turin (2016), Kunsthaus Bregenz (2015), traveling exhibition at Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofía, Madrid, at the New Museum, New York and Serpentine Gallery, London (2012–13) and Wiels Brussels, Culturegest Lisboa, Lisbon and Museion Bozen, Bolzano (2012–13). Her 2005 retrospective Post-Menopause took place at Museum Ludwig Köln, Cologne and MAXXI, Rome. In 1999, she became the first female artist to represent Germany at the Venice Biennial. Her work was included in Documenta X (1997) and Documenta 13 (2012) in Kassel and the 59th International Art Exhibition – La Biennale di Venezia (2022).

<p><b>John Baldessari<br />
</b><i>Commissioned Painting: A Painting by Patrick X. Nidorf O.S.A.</i>, 1969</p>
<p><b>John Baldessari<br />
</b><i>Commissioned Painting: A Painting by Patrick X. Nidorf O.S.A.</i>, 1969<br />
Acrylic and oil on canvas<br />
150.5 × 115.6 cm | 59 1/4 × 45 1/2 inches<br />
155.3 × 120 × 5.4 cm | 61 1/8 × 47 1/4 × 2 1/8 inches (framed)</p>
<p><b>John Baldessari<br />
</b><i>Commissioned Painting: A Painting by Patrick X. Nidorf O.S.A.</i>, 1969<br />
Acrylic and oil on canvas<br />
150.5 × 115.6 cm | 59 1/4 × 45 1/2 inches<br />
155.3 × 120 × 5.4 cm | 61 1/8 × 47 1/4 × 2 1/8 inches (framed)</p>
<p><b>John Baldessari<br />
</b><i>Commissioned Painting: A Painting by Patrick X. Nidorf O.S.A.</i>, 1969<br />
Acrylic and oil on canvas<br />
150.5 × 115.6 cm | 59 1/4 × 45 1/2 inches<br />
155.3 × 120 × 5.4 cm | 61 1/8 × 47 1/4 × 2 1/8 inches (framed)</p>
<p><b>John Baldessari<br />
</b><i>Commissioned Painting: A Painting by Patrick X. Nidorf O.S.A.</i>, 1969<br />
Acrylic and oil on canvas<br />
150.5 × 115.6 cm | 59 1/4 × 45 1/2 inches<br />
155.3 × 120 × 5.4 cm | 61 1/8 × 47 1/4 × 2 1/8 inches (framed)</p>

John Baldessari
Commissioned Painting: A Painting by Patrick X. Nidorf O.S.A., 1969
Acrylic and oil on canvas
150.5 × 115.6 cm | 59 1/4 × 45 1/2 inches
155.3 × 120 × 5.4 cm | 61 1/8 × 47 1/4 × 2 1/8 inches (framed)

John Baldessari
Commissioned Painting: A Painting by Patrick X. Nidorf O.S.A., 1969
Acrylic and oil on canvas


150.5 × 115.6 cm | 59 1/4 × 45 1/2 inches
155.3 × 120 × 5.4 cm | 61 1/8 × 47 1/4 × 2 1/8 inches (framed)

John Baldessari, a pioneer of American Conceptualism, continually challenged clichés and explored the expectations that shape how we perceive works of art. Commissioned Painting: A Painting by Patrick X. Nidorf O.S.A. (1969) is an early display of Baldessari’s witty questioning of originality, authorship and aesthetics. The work stems from a seminal series in the artist’s oeuvre, which consists of fourteen canvases executed by amateur painters after photographs Baldessari took of his friend pointing out mundane objects. Distributing the artistic work amongst many actors, each features one photograph – in this case, the forefinger extends towards a night sky – faithfully copied by a “Sunday painter” whose name was later affixed by a sign painter and figures into the title.

Read more

The Commissioned Paintings not only cleverly reflect on the criticism of art purely “pointing at things,” but also reinterpreted and redefined art-making, marking an exciting touchstone in the evolution of conceptual art.

John Baldessari (1932–2020) lived and worked in Venice, CA. Selected solo exhibitions include Moderna Museet, Stockholm (2020), Laguna Art Museum, Laguna Beach (2019), Museo Jumex, Mexico City (2017), Städel Museum, Frankfurt am Main (2015), Garage Center for Contemporary Culture, Moscow (2013), Fondazione Prada, Milan (2010), Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam (2011) and Tate Modern, London (2009), which traveled to Museum of Contemporary Art, Barcelona (2010), Los Angeles County Museum of Art (2010), and Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York (2010–11). Selected group exhibitions include the 53rd Venice Biennale (2009) at which he was honored with the Golden Lion for Lifetime Achievement, Whitney Biennial (2009, 1983), Documenta VII (1982), Documenta V (1972) and the Carnegie International (1985–86).

<p><b>George Condo<br />
</b><i>Multicolored Diagonal Figure Composition</i>, 2023</p>
<p><b>George Condo<br />
</b><i>Multicolored Diagonal Figure Composition</i>, 2023<br />
Oil on linen<br />
203.2 × 203.2 cm | 80 × 80 inches</p>
<p><b>George Condo<br />
</b><i>Multicolored Diagonal Figure Composition</i>, 2023<br />
Oil on linen<br />
203.2 × 203.2 cm | 80 × 80 inches</p>
<p><b>George Condo<br />
</b><i>Multicolored Diagonal Figure Composition</i>, 2023<br />
Oil on linen<br />
203.2 × 203.2 cm | 80 × 80 inches</p>
<p><b>George Condo<br />
</b><i>Multicolored Diagonal Figure Composition</i>, 2023<br />
Oil on linen<br />
203.2 × 203.2 cm | 80 × 80 inches</p>
<p><b>George Condo<br />
</b><i>Multicolored Diagonal Figure Composition</i>, 2023<br />
Oil on linen<br />
203.2 × 203.2 cm | 80 × 80 inches</p>
<p><b>George Condo<br />
</b><i>Multicolored Diagonal Figure Composition</i>, 2023<br />
Oil on linen<br />
203.2 × 203.2 cm | 80 × 80 inches</p>
<p><b>George Condo<br />
</b><i>Multicolored Diagonal Figure Composition</i>, 2023<br />
Oil on linen<br />
203.2 × 203.2 cm | 80 × 80 inches</p>
<p><b>George Condo<br />
</b><i>Multicolored Diagonal Figure Composition</i>, 2023<br />
Oil on linen<br />
203.2 × 203.2 cm | 80 × 80 inches</p>

George Condo
Multicolored Diagonal Figure Composition, 2023
Oil on linen
203.2 × 203.2 cm | 80 × 80 inches

George Condo
Multicolored Diagonal Figure Composition, 2023
Oil on linen


203.2 × 203.2 cm | 80 × 80 inches

George Condo has held a central position in American painting for the past forty years, creating works that synthesize diverse aesthetic influences from art history, music, philosophy, and popular culture. Multicolored Diagonal Figure Composition (2023) exemplifies Condo’s mastery of color, form, and imagery, with its bold lines and overlapping forms revealing fragmented facial features and bodies and showcases the raw dynamism and intense emotional depth that define Condo’s celebrated artistic practice. Instantly recognizable within Condo’s extensive body of work, Multicolored Diagonal Figure Composition captivates with its striking composition and vibrant hues. The frenetic energy captured in this work epitomizes Condo’s unique pictorial language, characterized by what he terms “Artificial Realism” – a fusion of influences from Old Master painting, Cubism, Surrealism, Abstract Expressionism, and Pop art.

Read more

Amongst a backdrop of indeterminate fragmented features and bodies, asymmetrical eyes engage the viewer, teetering on the edge of representation and abstraction, highlighting the artist’s extraordinary virtuosity.

George Condo (*1957, Concord, NH) lives in New York. This June, Condo will open a major solo exhibition at the DESTE Foundation for Contemporary Art, Hydra, Greece (2024). Selected solo exhibitions also include Nouveau Musée National de Monaco – Villa Paloma (2023), The Morgan Library & Museum, New York (2023), Long Museum, Shanghai (2021), Cycladic Art Museum, Athens and Maritime Museum, Hong Kong (both 2018), Phillips Collection, Washington, DC (2017), traveled to Louisiana Museum of Modern Art, Humlebæk, Denmark (2017), Museum Berggruen, Berlin (2016), New Museum, New York (2010), traveled to Hayward Gallery, London (2011), Boijmans Van Beuningen, Rotterdam (2011), Schirn Kunsthalle, Frankfurt am Main (2012) and Kunstmuseum Luzern (2008). Selected group exhibitions include Venice Biennale (2019, 2013), 13th Biennale de Lyon (2015), 10th Gwangju Biennale (2014), Whitney Biennial (2010, 1987) and the 48th Corcoran Biennial, Washington DC (2005).

<p><b>Andreas Gursky<br />
</b><i>Karlsruhe, Siemens</i>, 1991</p>
<p><b>Andreas Gursky<br />
</b><i>Karlsruhe, Siemens</i>, 1991<br />
Inkjet-print, Diasec<br />
205 × 257 cm | 80 3/4 × 101 1/8 inches<br />
225 × 277 × 6.2 cm | 88 5/8 × 109 × 2 3/8 inches (framed)<br />
Edition of 4</p>
<p><b>Andreas Gursky<br />
</b><i>Karlsruhe, Siemens</i>, 1991<br />
Inkjet-print, Diasec<br />
205 × 257 cm | 80 3/4 × 101 1/8 inches<br />
225 × 277 × 6.2 cm | 88 5/8 × 109 × 2 3/8 inches (framed)<br />
Edition of 4</p>
<p><b>Andreas Gursky<br />
</b><i>Karlsruhe, Siemens</i>, 1991<br />
Inkjet-print, Diasec<br />
205 × 257 cm | 80 3/4 × 101 1/8 inches<br />
225 × 277 × 6.2 cm | 88 5/8 × 109 × 2 3/8 inches (framed)<br />
Edition of 4</p>
<p><b>Andreas Gursky<br />
</b><i>Karlsruhe, Siemens</i>, 1991<br />
Inkjet-print, Diasec<br />
205 × 257 cm | 80 3/4 × 101 1/8 inches<br />
225 × 277 × 6.2 cm | 88 5/8 × 109 × 2 3/8 inches (framed)<br />
Edition of 4</p>
<p><b>Andreas Gursky<br />
</b><i>Karlsruhe, Siemens</i>, 1991<br />
Inkjet-print, Diasec<br />
205 × 257 cm | 80 3/4 × 101 1/8 inches<br />
225 × 277 × 6.2 cm | 88 5/8 × 109 × 2 3/8 inches (framed)<br />
Edition of 4</p>
<p><b>Andreas Gursky<br />
</b><i>Karlsruhe, Siemens</i>, 1991<br />
Inkjet-print, Diasec<br />
205 × 257 cm | 80 3/4 × 101 1/8 inches<br />
225 × 277 × 6.2 cm | 88 5/8 × 109 × 2 3/8 inches (framed)<br />
Edition of 4</p>
<p><b>Andreas Gursky<br />
</b><i>Karlsruhe, Siemens</i>, 1991<br />
Inkjet-print, Diasec<br />
205 × 257 cm | 80 3/4 × 101 1/8 inches<br />
225 × 277 × 6.2 cm | 88 5/8 × 109 × 2 3/8 inches (framed)<br />
Edition of 4</p>

Andreas Gursky
Karlsruhe, Siemens, 1991
Inkjet-print, Diasec
205 × 257 cm | 80 3/4 × 101 1/8 inches
225 × 277 × 6.2 cm | 88 5/8 × 109 × 2 3/8 inches (framed)
Edition of 4

Andreas Gursky
Karlsruhe, Siemens, 1991
Inkjet-print, Diasec


205 × 257 cm | 80 3/4 × 101 1/8 inches
225 × 277 × 6.2 cm | 88 5/8 × 109 × 2 3/8 inches (framed)
Edition of 4

One of the most influential figures in contemporary art, Andreas Gursky has redefined the medium of photography in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. His large-format photographs capture the minutiae of modern-day experience – be it through landscape, architecture, or human industry – much in the same way as history painters approached everyday reality in centuries past. After a stylistic breakthrough in 1990, Gursky began to pursue “the balance between great scale and a huge amount of sharp detail” in his photographs, as he noted in an interview with The Guardian in 2019. “This was followed,” he remarked, “by a similarly large-scale image of the Siemens factory in Karlsruhe, Germany, with workers obscured by countless cables, boxes and things.”

Read more

As with so many photographs that followed, Karlsruhe, Siemens (1991), with its elaborate details of colorful machinery, coiling wires and grids of lights, desks and boxes, invites us to view it both from up close as well as afar, taking in the photograph’s monumental, painterly scale, while also considering the human toll of industrialization.

Andreas Gursky (*1955, Leipzig) lives and works in Dusseldorf. Solo exhibitions include Fondazione MAST, Bologna (2023), Amorepacific Museum of Art, Seoul (2022), Museum Küppersmühle, Duisburg (2021), MdbK Leipzig (2021), Hayward Gallery, London (2018), National Museum of Art, Osaka (2014), National Art Center, Tokyo (2013), Stiftung Museum Kunstpalast, Dusseldorf (2013) and Louisiana Museum of Modern Art, Copenhagen (2012). A solo exhibition organized by the Museum of Modern Art, New York (2001) toured to Centro de Arte Reina Sofía, Madrid, Centre Georges Pompidou, Paris, MCA, Chicago and SFMOMA, San Francisco. His first retrospective was first on view at Haus der Kunst, Munich and toured to Istanbul Modern and Sharjah Art Museum (2007), then to Ekaterina Foundation, Moscow and National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne (2008).

<p><b>Jenny Holzer<br />
</b><i>fake news and lies</i>, 2023</p>
<p><b>Jenny Holzer<br />
</b><i>fake news and lies</i>, 2023<br />
Caplain and platinum leaf and oil on linen<br />
Text: U.S. government document<br />
203.2 × 157.5 × 3.8 cm | 80 × 62 × 1 1/2 inches</p>
<p><b>Jenny Holzer<br />
</b><i>fake news and lies</i>, 2023<br />
Caplain and platinum leaf and oil on linen<br />
Text: U.S. government document<br />
203.2 × 157.5 × 3.8 cm | 80 × 62 × 1 1/2 inches</p>
<p><b>Jenny Holzer<br />
</b><i>fake news and lies</i>, 2023<br />
Caplain and platinum leaf and oil on linen<br />
Text: U.S. government document<br />
203.2 × 157.5 × 3.8 cm | 80 × 62 × 1 1/2 inches</p>
<p><b>Jenny Holzer<br />
</b><i>fake news and lies</i>, 2023<br />
Caplain and platinum leaf and oil on linen<br />
Text: U.S. government document<br />
203.2 × 157.5 × 3.8 cm | 80 × 62 × 1 1/2 inches</p>
<p><b>Jenny Holzer<br />
</b><i>fake news and lies</i>, 2023<br />
Caplain and platinum leaf and oil on linen<br />
Text: U.S. government document<br />
203.2 × 157.5 × 3.8 cm | 80 × 62 × 1 1/2 inches</p>
<p><b>Jenny Holzer<br />
</b><i>fake news and lies</i>, 2023<br />
Caplain and platinum leaf and oil on linen<br />
Text: U.S. government document<br />
203.2 × 157.5 × 3.8 cm | 80 × 62 × 1 1/2 inches</p>
<p><b>Jenny Holzer<br />
</b><i>fake news and lies</i>, 2023<br />
Caplain and platinum leaf and oil on linen<br />
Text: U.S. government document<br />
203.2 × 157.5 × 3.8 cm | 80 × 62 × 1 1/2 inches</p>
<p><b>Jenny Holzer<br />
</b><i>fake news and lies</i>, 2023<br />
Caplain and platinum leaf and oil on linen<br />
Text: U.S. government document<br />
203.2 × 157.5 × 3.8 cm | 80 × 62 × 1 1/2 inches</p>
<p><b>Jenny Holzer<br />
</b><i>fake news and lies</i>, 2023<br />
Caplain and platinum leaf and oil on linen<br />
Text: U.S. government document<br />
203.2 × 157.5 × 3.8 cm | 80 × 62 × 1 1/2 inches</p>

Jenny Holzer
fake news and lies, 2023
Caplain and platinum leaf and oil on linen
Text: U.S. government document
203.2 × 157.5 × 3.8 cm | 80 × 62 × 1 1/2 inches

Jenny Holzer
fake news and lies, 2023
Caplain and platinum leaf and oil on linen


Text: U.S. government document
203.2 × 157.5 × 3.8 cm | 80 × 62 × 1 1/2 inches

Jenny Holzer has been probing the aesthetic and political intersection of language, installation, and painting since the late 1970s. Since the early 2000s, Holzer has researched redacted US government documents released to the public under the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA). The source document for fake news and lies (2023) is a page from the investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 US presidential election. True to the original, the content is carefully reproduced to signify the traces of censorship and concealment within the text. Holzer then adds color and, in this case, metal leafing, creating works that invite viewers both to read and to look. Part political statement, part formalist work of art, the work improbably evokes a long history of abstraction, in particular the work of Kazimir Malevich (1879–1935) and the Constructivist movement’s notion that art could be directed towards social purposes.

Read more

By referencing the historical avant-garde with its faith in the power of art to change the world, Holzer’s paintings ask us to consider the relationship between painting and politics in the present.

Jenny Holzer (*1950, Gallipolis, OH) lives and works in New York. This May through September 2024, the Guggenheim, New York, will present a reinterpretation of Jenny Holzer’s groundbreaking 1989 installation. The largest survey show of her work to date was on view in 2023 at the Kunstsammlung Nordrhein-Westfalen, Dusseldorf. Holzer curated an exhibition on Louise Bourgeois’ work at Kunsthalle Basel in 2022. Selected solo shows include Guggenheim Museum, Bilbao (2019), Tate Modern, London (2019), Massachusetts Museum of Contemporary Art, North Adams (2017–present), Blenheim Art Foundation, Woodstock (2017), Museo Correr, Venice (2015), Neue Nationalgalerie, Berlin (2011, 2001), DHC/ART Foundation for Contemporary Art, Montreal and The Baltic, Gateshead (both 2010), Fondation Beyeler, Basel and Whitney Museum of American Art, New York (both 2009), Walker Art Center, Minneapolis (1991), Hamburger Kunsthalle (2000), as well as Dia Art Foundation, New York and Guggenheim Museum, New York (both 1989).

<p><b>Jenny Holzer<br />
</b><i>White Purple Curve</i>, 2005</p>
<p><b>Jenny Holzer<br />
</b><i>White Purple Curve</i>, 2005<br />
Truisms (1977–79)<br />
LED sign, stainless steel housing and bezel<br />
13.3 x 133.5 x 13.7 cm | 5 1/4 x 52 5/8 x 5 3/8 inches<br />
Edition of 6</p>
<p><b>Jenny Holzer<br />
</b><i>White Purple Curve</i>, 2005<br />
Truisms (1977–79)<br />
LED sign, stainless steel housing and bezel<br />
13.3 x 133.5 x 13.7 cm | 5 1/4 x 52 5/8 x 5 3/8 inches<br />
Edition of 6</p>
<p><b>Jenny Holzer<br />
</b><i>White Purple Curve</i>, 2005<br />
Truisms (1977–79)<br />
LED sign, stainless steel housing and bezel<br />
13.3 x 133.5 x 13.7 cm | 5 1/4 x 52 5/8 x 5 3/8 inches<br />
Edition of 6</p>
<p><b>Jenny Holzer<br />
</b><i>White Purple Curve</i>, 2005<br />
Truisms (1977–79)<br />
LED sign, stainless steel housing and bezel<br />
13.3 x 133.5 x 13.7 cm | 5 1/4 x 52 5/8 x 5 3/8 inches<br />
Edition of 6</p>
<p><b>Jenny Holzer<br />
</b><i>White Purple Curve</i>, 2005<br />
Truisms (1977–79)<br />
LED sign, stainless steel housing and bezel<br />
13.3 x 133.5 x 13.7 cm | 5 1/4 x 52 5/8 x 5 3/8 inches<br />
Edition of 6</p>
<p><b>Jenny Holzer<br />
</b><i>White Purple Curve</i>, 2005<br />
Truisms (1977–79)<br />
LED sign, stainless steel housing and bezel<br />
13.3 x 133.5 x 13.7 cm | 5 1/4 x 52 5/8 x 5 3/8 inches<br />
Edition of 6</p>

Jenny Holzer
White Purple Curve, 2005
Truisms (1977–79)
LED sign, stainless steel housing and bezel
13.3 x 133.5 x 13.7 cm | 5 1/4 x 52 5/8 x 5 3/8 inches
Edition of 6

Jenny Holzer
White Purple Curve, 2005
Truisms (1977–79)


LED sign, stainless steel housing and bezel
13.3 x 133.5 x 13.7 cm | 5 1/4 x 52 5/8 x 5 3/8 inches
Edition of 6

Jenny Holzer’s White Purple Curve (2005) is an LED sign emitting purple and white lights, featuring selections from one of her most iconic text series, Truisms (1977–79), a group of single-sentence declarations written by Holzer to resemble existing truisms, maxims, and clichés. Since the 1970s, LED signs have become integral to Holzer’s practice and her most visible medium. Often displayed in public spaces, their poetic and critical content raises questions about the complexities, paradoxes and ironies of social identity and politics, while also revealing the power of language. The vivid colors, the dynamism of tickers and the words’ linear movement engage viewers while they process information, altering their physical and psychological perception of meaning. Captivating both physically as well as conceptually, White Purple Curve highlights the beauty and intensities of the artist’s diverse oeuvre.

Read more

Jenny Holzer (*1950, Gallipolis, OH) lives and works in New York. This May through September 2024, the Guggenheim, New York, will present a reinterpretation of Jenny Holzer’s groundbreaking 1989 installation. The largest survey show of her work to date was on view in 2023 at the Kunstsammlung Nordrhein-Westfalen, Dusseldorf. Holzer curated an exhibition on Louise Bourgeois’ work at Kunsthalle Basel in 2022. Selected solo shows include Guggenheim Museum, Bilbao (2019), Tate Modern, London (2019), Massachusetts Museum of Contemporary Art, North Adams (2017–present), Blenheim Art Foundation, Woodstock (2017), Museo Correr, Venice (2015), Neue Nationalgalerie, Berlin (2011, 2001), DHC/ART Foundation for Contemporary Art, Montreal and The Baltic, Gateshead (both 2010), Fondation Beyeler, Basel and Whitney Museum of American Art, New York (both 2009), Walker Art Center, Minneapolis (1991), Hamburger Kunsthalle (2000), as well as Dia Art Foundation, New York and Guggenheim Museum, New York (both 1989).

<p><b>Anne Imhof<br />
</b><i>Suicidal Tendencies (Goya)</i>, 2024</p>
<p><b>Anne Imhof<br />
</b><i>Suicidal Tendencies (Goya)</i>, 2024<br />
Oil on canvas<br />
260 × 209 cm | 102 3/8 × 82 1/4 inches</p>
<p><b>Anne Imhof<br />
</b><i>Suicidal Tendencies (Goya)</i>, 2024<br />
Oil on canvas<br />
260 × 209 cm | 102 3/8 × 82 1/4 inches</p>
<p><b>Anne Imhof<br />
</b><i>Suicidal Tendencies (Goya)</i>, 2024<br />
Oil on canvas<br />
260 × 209 cm | 102 3/8 × 82 1/4 inches</p>
<p><b>Anne Imhof<br />
</b><i>Suicidal Tendencies (Goya)</i>, 2024<br />
Oil on canvas<br />
260 × 209 cm | 102 3/8 × 82 1/4 inches</p>
<p><b>Anne Imhof<br />
</b><i>Suicidal Tendencies (Goya)</i>, 2024<br />
Oil on canvas<br />
260 × 209 cm | 102 3/8 × 82 1/4 inches</p>
<p><b>Anne Imhof<br />
</b><i>Suicidal Tendencies (Goya)</i>, 2024<br />
Oil on canvas<br />
260 × 209 cm | 102 3/8 × 82 1/4 inches</p>
<p><b>Anne Imhof<br />
</b><i>Suicidal Tendencies (Goya)</i>, 2024<br />
Oil on canvas<br />
260 × 209 cm | 102 3/8 × 82 1/4 inches</p>

Anne Imhof
Suicidal Tendencies (Goya), 2024
Oil on canvas
260 × 209 cm | 102 3/8 × 82 1/4 inches

Anne Imhof
Suicidal Tendencies (Goya), 2024
Oil on canvas


260 × 209 cm | 102 3/8 × 82 1/4 inches

Anne Imhof is recognized internationally for her genre-spanning practice that encompasses performance and choreography, painting and drawing, and installation and sculpture. Her poignant abstractions are frequently characterized by a keen interest in the human body, and though her work is inherently multifaceted and continues to expand into ever more media, painting remains a consistent line within her oeuvre. Her method involves layers upon layers of paint, which are blended until the painting’s atmosphere recalls those of the artist’s performances: artificial, disarming and seductive. Her new painting, Suicidal Tendencies (Goya) (2024), is reduced of color – its grayness shifting with light and chiaroscuro, recalling Dark Romanticism’s themes of loneliness, sadness, desire and death. In a remarkable amalgamation of layers of reality and artifice, we are presented with the painting of a photograph, which is only partially visible as if uncovered by a digital eraser. Suicidal Tendencies (Goya) exemplifies the varied ways in which Imhof’s works awaken myths and fears.

Read more

Anne Imhof (*1978, Gießen, Germany) lives and works in Berlin and Los Angeles. In June 2024, Imhof will be presenting a solo show of her works at Kunsthaus Bregenz. Selected solo exhibitions include Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam (2022), Palais de Tokyo, Paris (2021), Tate Modern, London (2019), Hamburger Bahnhof, Berlin (2016), Kunsthalle Basel (2016), MoMA PS1, New York (2015), Carré d’Art – Musée d’Art Contemporain de Nîmes (2014), and Portikus, Frankfurt am Main (2013). Her work has also been featured in numerous group exhibitions, including at Aichi Triennale, Aichi Prefecture (2022), Kunstmuseum Winterthur (2022), Tai Kwun, Hong Kong (2019), La Biennale di Venezia (2017), La Biennale de Montréal (2016), Palais de Tokyo, Paris (2015), Centre Pompidou, Paris (2015), and the Museum für Moderne Kunst, Frankfurt am Main (2014). In 2017, Imhof was awarded the Golden Lion at the Venice Biennale.

<p><b>Barbara Kruger<br />
</b><i>Untitled (Fame and fortune)</i>, 2024</p>
<p><b>Barbara Kruger<br />
</b><i>Untitled (Fame and fortune)</i>, 2024<br />
Digital print on vinyl<br />
213.4 × 213.4 × 6.7 cm | 84 × 84 × 2 5/8 inches</p>
<p><b>Barbara Kruger<br />
</b><i>Untitled (Fame and fortune)</i>, 2024<br />
Digital print on vinyl<br />
213.4 × 213.4 × 6.7 cm | 84 × 84 × 2 5/8 inches</p>
<p><b>Barbara Kruger<br />
</b><i>Untitled (Fame and fortune)</i>, 2024<br />
Digital print on vinyl<br />
213.4 × 213.4 × 6.7 cm | 84 × 84 × 2 5/8 inches</p>
<p><b>Barbara Kruger<br />
</b><i>Untitled (Fame and fortune)</i>, 2024<br />
Digital print on vinyl<br />
213.4 × 213.4 × 6.7 cm | 84 × 84 × 2 5/8 inches</p>
<p><b>Barbara Kruger<br />
</b><i>Untitled (Fame and fortune)</i>, 2024<br />
Digital print on vinyl<br />
213.4 × 213.4 × 6.7 cm | 84 × 84 × 2 5/8 inches</p>
<p><b>Barbara Kruger<br />
</b><i>Untitled (Fame and fortune)</i>, 2024<br />
Digital print on vinyl<br />
213.4 × 213.4 × 6.7 cm | 84 × 84 × 2 5/8 inches</p>
<p><b>Barbara Kruger<br />
</b><i>Untitled (Fame and fortune)</i>, 2024<br />
Digital print on vinyl<br />
213.4 × 213.4 × 6.7 cm | 84 × 84 × 2 5/8 inches</p>

Barbara Kruger
Untitled (Fame and fortune), 2024
Digital print on vinyl
213.4 × 213.4 × 6.7 cm | 84 × 84 × 2 5/8 inches

Barbara Kruger
Untitled (Fame and fortune), 2024
Digital print on vinyl


213.4 × 213.4 × 6.7 cm | 84 × 84 × 2 5/8 inches

The razor-sharp, witty and unmistakable work of Barbara Kruger explores the power of image and word and touches on the dynamics of control, class, corruption and consumerism. For over four decades, her voice and aesthetic have transcended the insularity of the art world and influenced everyday visual culture. Untitled (Fame and fortune) (2024) stems from Kruger’s new body of textual work grappling with our current dystopian reality. Activating the space and playing with the seductive visual effects of three-dimensionality, the large-scale white-on-black digital print on vinyl exemplifies Kruger’s ability to consistently question how we reveal ourselves to one another and engage with the cultures that construct and contain us.

Read more

Barbara Kruger (*1945, Newark, NJ) lives and works in Los Angeles and New York. Solo shows include the Serpentine Galleries (2024), Museum of Modern Art, New York (2022), Los Angeles County Museum of Art (2022), Neue Nationalgalerie, Berlin (2022), Art Institute of Chicago (2021), AMOREPACIFIC Museum of Art, Seoul (2019), National Gallery of Art, Washington, DC (2016), Modern Art Oxford (2014), Kunsthaus Bregenz (2013), Schirn Kunsthalle, Frankfurt am Main (2010), Gallery of Modern Art, Glasgow (2005), Whitney Museum of American Art, New York (2000), Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles (1999), Serpentine Gallery, London (1994) and Kunsthalle Basel (1984). Recent group shows include The Broad, Los Angeles (2023), La Biennale di Venezia (2022), Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum, Boston (2021), Museum of Modern Art, Warsaw (2021), The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York (2020), Walker Art Center, Minneapolis (2020), Nationalmuseum, Stockholm (2019) and Hamburger Bahnhof, Berlin (2018).

<p><b>Kara Walker<br />
</b><i>Colored Landscape with Negro Rückenfigur</i>, 2024</p>
<p><b>Kara Walker<br />
</b><i>Colored Landscape with Negro Rückenfigur</i>, 2024<br />
Gansai watercolor and Gampi paper on cut paper on paper<br />
57.2 × 75.9 cm | 22 1/2 × 29 7/8 inches<br />
63.5 × 82.2 × 4.4 cm | 25 × 32 3/8 × 1 3/4 inches (framed)</p>
<p><b>Kara Walker<br />
</b><i>Colored Landscape with Negro Rückenfigur</i>, 2024<br />
Gansai watercolor and Gampi paper on cut paper on paper<br />
57.2 × 75.9 cm | 22 1/2 × 29 7/8 inches<br />
63.5 × 82.2 × 4.4 cm | 25 × 32 3/8 × 1 3/4 inches (framed)</p>
<p><b>Kara Walker<br />
</b><i>Colored Landscape with Negro Rückenfigur</i>, 2024<br />
Gansai watercolor and Gampi paper on cut paper on paper<br />
57.2 × 75.9 cm | 22 1/2 × 29 7/8 inches<br />
63.5 × 82.2 × 4.4 cm | 25 × 32 3/8 × 1 3/4 inches (framed)</p>
<p><b>Kara Walker<br />
</b><i>Colored Landscape with Negro Rückenfigur</i>, 2024<br />
Gansai watercolor and Gampi paper on cut paper on paper<br />
57.2 × 75.9 cm | 22 1/2 × 29 7/8 inches<br />
63.5 × 82.2 × 4.4 cm | 25 × 32 3/8 × 1 3/4 inches (framed)</p>
<p><b>Kara Walker<br />
</b><i>Colored Landscape with Negro Rückenfigur</i>, 2024<br />
Gansai watercolor and Gampi paper on cut paper on paper<br />
57.2 × 75.9 cm | 22 1/2 × 29 7/8 inches<br />
63.5 × 82.2 × 4.4 cm | 25 × 32 3/8 × 1 3/4 inches (framed)</p>
<p><b>Kara Walker<br />
</b><i>Colored Landscape with Negro Rückenfigur</i>, 2024<br />
Gansai watercolor and Gampi paper on cut paper on paper<br />
57.2 × 75.9 cm | 22 1/2 × 29 7/8 inches<br />
63.5 × 82.2 × 4.4 cm | 25 × 32 3/8 × 1 3/4 inches (framed)</p>
<p><b>Kara Walker<br />
</b><i>Colored Landscape with Negro Rückenfigur</i>, 2024<br />
Gansai watercolor and Gampi paper on cut paper on paper<br />
57.2 × 75.9 cm | 22 1/2 × 29 7/8 inches<br />
63.5 × 82.2 × 4.4 cm | 25 × 32 3/8 × 1 3/4 inches (framed)</p>

Kara Walker
Colored Landscape with Negro Rückenfigur, 2024
Gansai watercolor and Gampi paper on cut paper on paper
57.2 × 75.9 cm | 22 1/2 × 29 7/8 inches
63.5 × 82.2 × 4.4 cm | 25 × 32 3/8 × 1 3/4 inches (framed)

Kara Walker
Colored Landscape with Negro Rückenfigur, 2024
Gansai watercolor and Gampi paper on cut paper on paper


57.2 × 75.9 cm | 22 1/2 × 29 7/8 inches
63.5 × 82.2 × 4.4 cm | 25 × 32 3/8 × 1 3/4 inches (framed)

Kara Walker’s candid investigations of race, gender, sexuality, and violence through silhouetted figures, which have appeared in numerous exhibitions world-wide, have cemented her as one of the most complex contemporary American painters of her generation. Walker’s Colored Landscape with Negro Rückenfigur (2024), implements her iconic cut-paper silhouette technique and intricately weaves together elements of romance, history, and the sublime. The title and its central figure turned away make reference to German Romantic painting from the likes of Caspar David Friedrich and his own mysterious, colored landscapes. Through her skillful manipulation of historical modes, Walker creates a pastiche that challenges traditional narratives of race, gender, and power.

Read more

The use of cut-paper silhouettes serves as a compositional device akin to those found in painting, allowing Walker to craft scenes that evoke a sense of drama and tension. In her hands, the simplicity of the silhouette becomes a powerful tool for exploring complex themes and confronting viewers with uncomfortable truths about the past and present.

Kara Walker (*1969, Stockton, CA) lives and works in New York. In July 2024, a major new site-specific commission by Walker will be unveiled at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, remaining on view until May 2026. Selected solo exhibitions include National Gallery of Australia (2023), De Pont Museum, Tilburg, The Netherlands (2022), Schirn Kunsthalle, Frankfurt am Main (2021), Kunstmuseum Basel (2021), Turbine Hall, Tate Modern, London (2019), Domino Sugar Refinery, Brooklyn, New York (2014), Camden Arts Centre, London and Art Institute of Chicago (both 2013), Hammer Museum, Los Angeles (2008), Walker Art Center, Minneapolis and Whitney Museum, New York (both 2007) and The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York (2006).

<p><b>Kara Walker<br />
</b><i>Petechiae and Purpura in the Underworld</i>, 2024</p>
<p><b>Kara Walker<br />
</b><i>Petechiae and Purpura in the Underworld</i>, 2024<br />
Gansai watercolor and sumi-e ink on cut paper on mulberry paper<br />
174 × 193.4 cm | 68 1/2 × 76 1/8 inches<br />
184.2 × 203.5 × 8.7 cm | 72 1/2 × 80 1/8 × 3 7/16 inches (framed)</p>
<p><b>Kara Walker<br />
</b><i>Petechiae and Purpura in the Underworld</i>, 2024<br />
Gansai watercolor and sumi-e ink on cut paper on mulberry paper<br />
174 × 193.4 cm | 68 1/2 × 76 1/8 inches<br />
184.2 × 203.5 × 8.7 cm | 72 1/2 × 80 1/8 × 3 7/16 inches (framed)</p>
<p><b>Kara Walker<br />
</b><i>Petechiae and Purpura in the Underworld</i>, 2024<br />
Gansai watercolor and sumi-e ink on cut paper on mulberry paper<br />
174 × 193.4 cm | 68 1/2 × 76 1/8 inches<br />
184.2 × 203.5 × 8.7 cm | 72 1/2 × 80 1/8 × 3 7/16 inches (framed)</p>
<p><b>Kara Walker<br />
</b><i>Petechiae and Purpura in the Underworld</i>, 2024<br />
Gansai watercolor and sumi-e ink on cut paper on mulberry paper<br />
174 × 193.4 cm | 68 1/2 × 76 1/8 inches<br />
184.2 × 203.5 × 8.7 cm | 72 1/2 × 80 1/8 × 3 7/16 inches (framed)</p>
<p><b>Kara Walker<br />
</b><i>Petechiae and Purpura in the Underworld</i>, 2024<br />
Gansai watercolor and sumi-e ink on cut paper on mulberry paper<br />
174 × 193.4 cm | 68 1/2 × 76 1/8 inches<br />
184.2 × 203.5 × 8.7 cm | 72 1/2 × 80 1/8 × 3 7/16 inches (framed)</p>
<p><b>Kara Walker<br />
</b><i>Petechiae and Purpura in the Underworld</i>, 2024<br />
Gansai watercolor and sumi-e ink on cut paper on mulberry paper<br />
174 × 193.4 cm | 68 1/2 × 76 1/8 inches<br />
184.2 × 203.5 × 8.7 cm | 72 1/2 × 80 1/8 × 3 7/16 inches (framed)</p>

Kara Walker
Petechiae and Purpura in the Underworld, 2024
Gansai watercolor and sumi-e ink on cut paper on mulberry paper
174 × 193.4 cm | 68 1/2 × 76 1/8 inches
184.2 × 203.5 × 8.7 cm | 72 1/2 × 80 1/8 × 3 7/16 inches (framed)

Kara Walker
Petechiae and Purpura in the Underworld, 2024
Gansai watercolor and sumi-e ink on cut paper on mulberry paper


174 × 193.4 cm | 68 1/2 × 76 1/8 inches
184.2 × 203.5 × 8.7 cm | 72 1/2 × 80 1/8 × 3 7/16 inches (framed)

Walker, acclaimed for her sophisticated yet provocative depictions deeply rooted in established pictorial traditions, scrutinizes themes of race, gender, sexuality, and violence, positioning herself as a preeminent figure among contemporary American artists of her era. Spanning various mediums such as painting, sculpture, filmmaking, and her renowned cut-paper silhouettes, Walker’s body of work showcases a profound exploration of societal complexities. Petechiae and Purpura in the Underworld (2024) epitomizes Walker’s prowess in constructing narratives imbued with layers of references and intricate racial archetypes. Through a visual maelstrom of chaos, the work compels viewers to confront their own implication in the construction of such narratives. Employing her signature cut-paper silhouettes alongside watercolor and ink drawings, Walker crafts scenes depicting slavery in the Antebellum South, offering a lens through which to contemplate contemporary realities.

Read more

While visually evoking harrowing historical contexts, the title of the work suggests ideas of hidden suffering and internal turmoil, medical connotations of injury and illness paired with metaphorical dimensions of the unconscious, inviting viewers to contemplate the intersection of physical and metaphysical realms.

Kara Walker (*1969, Stockton, CA) lives and works in New York. In July 2024, a major new site-specific commission by Walker will be unveiled at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, remaining on view until May 2026. Selected solo exhibitions include National Gallery of Australia (2023), De Pont Museum, Tilburg, The Netherlands (2022), Schirn Kunsthalle, Frankfurt am Main (2021), Kunstmuseum Basel (2021), Turbine Hall, Tate Modern, London (2019), Domino Sugar Refinery, Brooklyn, New York (2014), Camden Arts Centre, London and Art Institute of Chicago (both 2013), Hammer Museum, Los Angeles (2008), Walker Art Center, Minneapolis and Whitney Museum, New York (both 2007) and The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York (2006).

<p><b>Louise Lawler<br />
</b><i>Three Flags (swiped again, two)</i>, 2022</p>
<p><b>Louise Lawler<br />
</b><i>Three Flags (swiped again, two)</i>, 2022<br />
Dye sublimation print on museum box<br />
121.9 x 216.7 cm | 48 x 85 5/16 inches<br />
Edition of 5 + 1 AP</p>
<p><b>Louise Lawler<br />
</b><i>Three Flags (swiped again, two)</i>, 2022<br />
Dye sublimation print on museum box<br />
121.9 x 216.7 cm | 48 x 85 5/16 inches<br />
Edition of 5 + 1 AP</p>
<p><b>Louise Lawler<br />
</b><i>Three Flags (swiped again, two)</i>, 2022<br />
Dye sublimation print on museum box<br />
121.9 x 216.7 cm | 48 x 85 5/16 inches<br />
Edition of 5 + 1 AP</p>

Louise Lawler
Three Flags (swiped again, two), 2022
Dye sublimation print on museum box
121.9 x 216.7 cm | 48 x 85 5/16 inches
Edition of 5 + 1 AP

Louise Lawler
Three Flags (swiped again, two), 2022
Dye sublimation print on museum box


121.9 x 216.7 cm | 48 x 85 5/16 inches
Edition of 5 + 1 AP

Louise Lawler is a steadfast investigator of picture-making. Three Flags (swiped again, two) (2022) is a work from the artist’s recent body of “swiped” images – in particular a series featuring photographs of Jasper Johns’ iconic painting Three Flags (1958), taken during the de-installation of the exhibition Jasper Johns: Mind/Mirror at the Whitney Museum of American Art in New York. Using long exposures, swift camera movements and cropping, Lawler creates abstract impressions of this well-known motif, which seems to vanish before the viewer’s eyes like a blurry memory. These transcendent images perpetually move and shift. As an analogue method to manipulate the image, this swipe challenges perception and mirrors the fast-paced flood of images that characterizes everyday life in the digital era.

Read more

Louise Lawler (*1947, New York) lives and works in New York. Solo exhibitions include Art Institute of Chicago, Chicago (2019), Sammlung Verbund, Vienna (2018), MoMA, New York (2017), Museum Ludwig, Cologne (2013), Albertinum, Dresden (2012), Wexner Center for the Arts, Columbus, Ohio (2006), Dia Beacon, New York (2005), and Museum for Gegenwartskunst, Basel (2004). Selected group exhibitions include Fondazione Prada, Venice, Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, Museum Brandhorst, Munich, Walker Art Center, Minneapolis, Institute of Contemporary Art, Boston, MoMA, New York, MoMA PS1, New York, MUMOK, Vienna, Hammer Museum, Los Angeles, and the Whitney Museum, New York, which additionally featured the artist in its 1991, 2000, and 2008 biennials. Her work was also included in the 59th International Art Exhibition – La Biennale di Venezia (2022).

<p><b>Louise Lawler<br />
</b><i>Pedestal</i>, 2008/2010</p>
<p><b>Louise Lawler<br />
</b><i>Pedestal</i>, 2008/2010<br />
Chromogenic color print on museum box<br />
141.6 x 114.3 cm | 55 3/4 x 45 inches<br />
Edition of 5 + 1 AP</p>
<p><b>Louise Lawler<br />
</b><i>Pedestal</i>, 2008/2010<br />
Chromogenic color print on museum box<br />
141.6 x 114.3 cm | 55 3/4 x 45 inches<br />
Edition of 5 + 1 AP</p>
<p><b>Louise Lawler<br />
</b><i>Pedestal</i>, 2008/2010<br />
Chromogenic color print on museum box<br />
141.6 x 114.3 cm | 55 3/4 x 45 inches<br />
Edition of 5 + 1 AP</p>

Louise Lawler
Pedestal, 2008/2010
Chromogenic color print on museum box
141.6 x 114.3 cm | 55 3/4 x 45 inches
Edition of 5 + 1 AP

Louise Lawler
Pedestal, 2008/2010
Chromogenic color print on museum box


141.6 x 114.3 cm | 55 3/4 x 45 inches
Edition of 5 + 1 AP

Louise Lawler is a pioneer of conceptual photography who emerged with the Pictures Generation artists of the 1970s and 80s. Her images capture art objects on view in museums, auction houses or private homes and institutions. Lawler’s image-making is interested in the ways art, and meaning itself, can be produced and changed by different kinds of presentation. In Pedestal (2008/2010), Lawler photographed objects in the Paris home of Yves Saint Laurent, including stacks of magazines and miniaturized classical sculptures, each with ornate pedestals.

Read more

Louise Lawler (*1947, New York) lives and works in New York. Solo exhibitions include Art Institute of Chicago, Chicago (2019), Sammlung Verbund, Vienna (2018), MoMA, New York (2017), Museum Ludwig, Cologne (2013), Albertinum, Dresden (2012), Wexner Center for the Arts, Columbus, Ohio (2006), Dia Beacon, New York (2005), and Museum for Gegenwartskunst, Basel (2004). Selected group exhibitions include Fondazione Prada, Venice, Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, Museum Brandhorst, Munich, Walker Art Center, Minneapolis, Institute of Contemporary Art, Boston, MoMA, New York, MoMA PS1, New York, MUMOK, Vienna, Hammer Museum, Los Angeles, and the Whitney Museum, New York, which additionally featured the artist in its 1991, 2000, and 2008 biennials. Her work was also included in the 59th International Art Exhibition – La Biennale di Venezia (2022).

<p><b>Louise Lawler<br />
</b><i>Souvenir for Eau de Cologne, Hong Kong</i>, 1999/2015/2019</p>
<p><b>Louise Lawler<br />
</b><i>Souvenir for Eau de Cologne, Hong Kong</i>, 1999/2015/2019<br />
Chromogenic color print on plywood<br />
12.7 x 100 x 2.4 cm | 5 x 39 3/8 x 15/16 inches<br />
Edition of 20 + 4 AP</p>
<p><b>Louise Lawler<br />
</b><i>Souvenir for Eau de Cologne, Hong Kong</i>, 1999/2015/2019<br />
Chromogenic color print on plywood<br />
12.7 x 100 x 2.4 cm | 5 x 39 3/8 x 15/16 inches<br />
Edition of 20 + 4 AP</p>
<p><b>Louise Lawler<br />
</b><i>Souvenir for Eau de Cologne, Hong Kong</i>, 1999/2015/2019<br />
Chromogenic color print on plywood<br />
12.7 x 100 x 2.4 cm | 5 x 39 3/8 x 15/16 inches<br />
Edition of 20 + 4 AP</p>

Louise Lawler
Souvenir for Eau de Cologne, Hong Kong, 1999/2015/2019
Chromogenic color print on plywood
12.7 x 100 x 2.4 cm | 5 x 39 3/8 x 15/16 inches
Edition of 20 + 4 AP

Louise Lawler
Souvenir for Eau de Cologne, Hong Kong, 1999/2015/2019
Chromogenic color print on plywood


12.7 x 100 x 2.4 cm | 5 x 39 3/8 x 15/16 inches
Edition of 20 + 4 AP

Souvenir for Eau de Cologne, Hong Kong (1999/2015/2019) captures, and concretizes, the stretching of one of Louise Lawler’s photographs to the scale of a wall at the exhibition Eau de Cologne in Hong Kong in 2019. Lawler plays with the idea of a “souvenir” of that event, but through her adept selection, cropping, scaling and titling, redirects her viewers’ attention to consider the value – whether monetary, aesthetic or sentimental – that we impart onto objects of art.

Read more

Louise Lawler (*1947, New York) lives and works in New York. Solo exhibitions include Art Institute of Chicago, Chicago (2019), Sammlung Verbund, Vienna (2018), MoMA, New York (2017), Museum Ludwig, Cologne (2013), Albertinum, Dresden (2012), Wexner Center for the Arts, Columbus, Ohio (2006), Dia Beacon, New York (2005), and Museum for Gegenwartskunst, Basel (2004). Selected group exhibitions include Fondazione Prada, Venice, Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, Museum Brandhorst, Munich, Walker Art Center, Minneapolis, Institute of Contemporary Art, Boston, MoMA, New York, MoMA PS1, New York, MUMOK, Vienna, Hammer Museum, Los Angeles, and the Whitney Museum, New York, which additionally featured the artist in its 1991, 2000, and 2008 biennials. Her work was also included in the 59th International Art Exhibition – La Biennale di Venezia (2022).

<p><b>Salvo<br />
</b><i>Alba 2000</i>, 2002</p>
<p><b>Salvo<br />
</b><i>Alba 2000</i>, 2002<br />
Oil on canvas<br />
60 × 45 cm | 23 5/8 × 17 3/4 inches</p>
<p><b>Salvo<br />
</b><i>Alba 2000</i>, 2002<br />
Oil on canvas<br />
60 × 45 cm | 23 5/8 × 17 3/4 inches</p>
<p><b>Salvo<br />
</b><i>Alba 2000</i>, 2002<br />
Oil on canvas<br />
60 × 45 cm | 23 5/8 × 17 3/4 inches</p>
<p><b>Salvo<br />
</b><i>Alba 2000</i>, 2002<br />
Oil on canvas<br />
60 × 45 cm | 23 5/8 × 17 3/4 inches</p>
<p><b>Salvo<br />
</b><i>Alba 2000</i>, 2002<br />
Oil on canvas<br />
60 × 45 cm | 23 5/8 × 17 3/4 inches</p>
<p><b>Salvo<br />
</b><i>Alba 2000</i>, 2002<br />
Oil on canvas<br />
60 × 45 cm | 23 5/8 × 17 3/4 inches</p>
<p><b>Salvo<br />
</b><i>Alba 2000</i>, 2002<br />
Oil on canvas<br />
60 × 45 cm | 23 5/8 × 17 3/4 inches</p>

Salvo
Alba 2000, 2002
Oil on canvas
60 × 45 cm | 23 5/8 × 17 3/4 inches

Salvo
Alba 2000, 2002
Oil on canvas


60 × 45 cm | 23 5/8 × 17 3/4 inches

Salvo began his career in the late 1960s, surrounded by the dialogues of Arte Povera with artists such as Mario Merz, Guiseppe Penone and Alighiero Boetti. His conceptual practice shifted dramatically in 1973, when he turned decisively to figurative painting in a style that ranged from the pre-Modern naturalism and grace of Giotto and Botticelli to the surreal atmospheres of Giorgio de Chirico. For over four decades, Salvo remained true to his vision, painting landscapes and cityscapes that captured the specifics of his native country; their dreamlike narratives revel in sumptuous light effects and invariably evoke the passage of time. Alba 2000 (2002), the Italian word for dawn, exhibits Salvo’s mastery of color and light: a dusky, snowy scene outside a factory is pierced geometrically by the light of a lamppost. In the background, by contrast, the darkened sky is tinged at the horizon with the golden glow of sunrise. The work is a perfect summation of Salvo’s practice, whose lasting impact is still felt today.

Read more

An exhibition pairing the work of Salvo and Andreas Schulze will open at Sprüth Magers, London in November 2024.

Salvo (1947–2015) lived and worked in Turin. Solo exhibitions include Museum of Contemporary Art, Rome (2022), Museo d’Arte della Svizzera Italiana, Lugano (2017, with Alighiero Boetti), Museo d’Arte Contemporanea, Lissone (2015), Galleria d’Arte Moderna e Contemporanea, Turin (2007) and Bergamo (2002), Musée d’Art Contemporain, Nîmes and Museum Boijmans van Beuningen, Rotterdam (both 1988), Kunstmuseum Lucerne (1983), and Mannheimer Kunstverein and Museum Folkwang, Essen (both 1977). In addition to participating in Documenta 5 (1972) and the 1976 and 1988 Venice Biennales, recent group exhibitions include Kröller-Müller Museum, Otterlo, The Netherlands (2023), Kunsthaus Glarus, Switzerland (2022), Castello di Rivoli, Turin (2021) and Menil Drawing Institute, Houston (2020).

<p><b>Peter Fischli David Weiss<br />
</b><i>Indigenous Forest Floor </i>and<i> Still no one knows it just the same, that Rumpelstiltskin is my name </i>from<i> Suddenly this Overview</i>, 1981–2012 </p>
<p><b>Peter Fischli David Weiss<br />
</b><i>Indigenous Forest Floor </i>and<i> Still no one knows it just the same, that Rumpelstiltskin is my name </i>from<i> Suddenly this Overview</i>, 1981–2012 <br />
Unfired clay (2 parts)<br />
Part 1: 21 x 19 x 13 cm | 8 1/4 x 7 1/2 x 5 1/8 inches<br />
Part 2: 14 x 12 x 9 cm | 5 1/2 x 4 3/4 x 3 1/2 inches</p>
<p><b>Peter Fischli David Weiss<br />
</b><i>Indigenous Forest Floor </i>and<i> Still no one knows it just the same, that Rumpelstiltskin is my name </i>from<i> Suddenly this Overview</i>, 1981–2012 <br />
Unfired clay (2 parts)<br />
Part 1: 21 x 19 x 13 cm | 8 1/4 x 7 1/2 x 5 1/8 inches<br />
Part 2: 14 x 12 x 9 cm | 5 1/2 x 4 3/4 x 3 1/2 inches</p>
<p><b>Peter Fischli David Weiss<br />
</b><i>Indigenous Forest Floor </i>and<i> Still no one knows it just the same, that Rumpelstiltskin is my name </i>from<i> Suddenly this Overview</i>, 1981–2012 <br />
Unfired clay (2 parts)<br />
Part 1: 21 x 19 x 13 cm | 8 1/4 x 7 1/2 x 5 1/8 inches<br />
Part 2: 14 x 12 x 9 cm | 5 1/2 x 4 3/4 x 3 1/2 inches</p>
<p><b>Peter Fischli David Weiss<br />
</b><i>Indigenous Forest Floor </i>and<i> Still no one knows it just the same, that Rumpelstiltskin is my name </i>from<i> Suddenly this Overview</i>, 1981–2012 <br />
Unfired clay (2 parts)<br />
Part 1: 21 x 19 x 13 cm | 8 1/4 x 7 1/2 x 5 1/8 inches<br />
Part 2: 14 x 12 x 9 cm | 5 1/2 x 4 3/4 x 3 1/2 inches</p>
<p><b>Peter Fischli David Weiss<br />
</b><i>Indigenous Forest Floor </i>and<i> Still no one knows it just the same, that Rumpelstiltskin is my name </i>from<i> Suddenly this Overview</i>, 1981–2012 <br />
Unfired clay (2 parts)<br />
Part 1: 21 x 19 x 13 cm | 8 1/4 x 7 1/2 x 5 1/8 inches<br />
Part 2: 14 x 12 x 9 cm | 5 1/2 x 4 3/4 x 3 1/2 inches</p>
<p><b>Peter Fischli David Weiss<br />
</b><i>Indigenous Forest Floor </i>and<i> Still no one knows it just the same, that Rumpelstiltskin is my name </i>from<i> Suddenly this Overview</i>, 1981–2012 <br />
Unfired clay (2 parts)<br />
Part 1: 21 x 19 x 13 cm | 8 1/4 x 7 1/2 x 5 1/8 inches<br />
Part 2: 14 x 12 x 9 cm | 5 1/2 x 4 3/4 x 3 1/2 inches</p>
<p><b>Peter Fischli David Weiss<br />
</b><i>Indigenous Forest Floor </i>and<i> Still no one knows it just the same, that Rumpelstiltskin is my name </i>from<i> Suddenly this Overview</i>, 1981–2012 <br />
Unfired clay (2 parts)<br />
Part 1: 21 x 19 x 13 cm | 8 1/4 x 7 1/2 x 5 1/8 inches<br />
Part 2: 14 x 12 x 9 cm | 5 1/2 x 4 3/4 x 3 1/2 inches</p>

Peter Fischli David Weiss
Indigenous Forest Floor and Still no one knows it just the same, that Rumpelstiltskin is my name from Suddenly this Overview, 1981–2012
Unfired clay (2 parts)
Part 1: 21 x 19 x 13 cm | 8 1/4 x 7 1/2 x 5 1/8 inches
Part 2: 14 x 12 x 9 cm | 5 1/2 x 4 3/4 x 3 1/2 inches

Peter Fischli David Weiss
Indigenous Forest Floor and Still no one knows it just the same, that Rumpelstiltskin is my name from Suddenly this Overview, 1981–2012
Unfired clay (2 parts)


Part 1: 21 x 19 x 13 cm | 8 1/4 x 7 1/2 x 5 1/8 inches
Part 2: 14 x 12 x 9 cm | 5 1/2 x 4 3/4 x 3 1/2 inches

The work of Peter Fischli and David Weiss takes the form of sculptures, videos, site-specific installations, projections and photographs, and their broad conceptual practice engages with the world of everyday life with wit and gentle irony. In 1981, the artists embarked on their first series of sculptures, Suddenly this Overview, which they continued until David Weiss’ death in 2012. With the impossible goal to inventory all of human knowledge and history, the artists utilized the malleable medium of unfired clay to produce quick tableaux depicting scenes that range from dramatic narratives to insignificant moments. In these particular two-part configurations, a crop of mushrooms adjoins the raucous forest dance from the fairy tale “Rumpelstiltskin.”

Read more

Peter Fischli (*1952 in Zürich) and David Weiss (1946–2012) began working together in the mid-1970s, continuing their collaborative practice until Weiss’ death. Solo exhibitions include Aspen Art Museum (2017), Art Institute of Chicago and San Francisco Museum of Modern Art (both 2017), Fondation Beyeler, Riehen/Basel (2016), Serpentine Gallery, London (2014), 21st Century Museum of Contemporary Art, Kanazawa (2010), and Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofia, Madrid (2009). Major retrospectives include Tate Modern, London (2006), Kunsthaus Zürich (2007), Deichtorhallen Hamburg (2008), as well as Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York and Museo Jumex, Mexico City (2016). Their work has been included in the Venice Biennale (2013, 2003, 1988), the Venice Architecture Biennale (2012), the Gwangju Biennale, South Korea (2010), Documenta X (1997) and Documenta VIII (1987). In 2003, Fischli and Weiss were awarded the Golden Lion at the 50th Venice Biennale.

<p><b>Hyun-Sook Song<br />
</b><i>5 Brushstrokes I</i>, 2023</p>
<p><b>Hyun-Sook Song<br />
</b><i>5 Brushstrokes I</i>, 2023<br />
Tempera on canvas<br />
200 × 130 cm | 78 3/4 × 51 1/8 inches</p>
<p><b>Hyun-Sook Song<br />
</b><i>5 Brushstrokes I</i>, 2023<br />
Tempera on canvas<br />
200 × 130 cm | 78 3/4 × 51 1/8 inches</p>
<p><b>Hyun-Sook Song<br />
</b><i>5 Brushstrokes I</i>, 2023<br />
Tempera on canvas<br />
200 × 130 cm | 78 3/4 × 51 1/8 inches</p>
<p><b>Hyun-Sook Song<br />
</b><i>5 Brushstrokes I</i>, 2023<br />
Tempera on canvas<br />
200 × 130 cm | 78 3/4 × 51 1/8 inches</p>
<p><b>Hyun-Sook Song<br />
</b><i>5 Brushstrokes I</i>, 2023<br />
Tempera on canvas<br />
200 × 130 cm | 78 3/4 × 51 1/8 inches</p>
<p><b>Hyun-Sook Song<br />
</b><i>5 Brushstrokes I</i>, 2023<br />
Tempera on canvas<br />
200 × 130 cm | 78 3/4 × 51 1/8 inches</p>
<p><b>Hyun-Sook Song<br />
</b><i>5 Brushstrokes I</i>, 2023<br />
Tempera on canvas<br />
200 × 130 cm | 78 3/4 × 51 1/8 inches</p>

Hyun-Sook Song
5 Brushstrokes I, 2023
Tempera on canvas
200 × 130 cm | 78 3/4 × 51 1/8 inches

Hyun-Sook Song
5 Brushstrokes I, 2023
Tempera on canvas


200 × 130 cm | 78 3/4 × 51 1/8 inches

Hyun-Sook Song’s works result from the understanding of painting as an act of concentrated meditation that records the artist’s state of mind. Her decades-long practice is characterized by a distinctive style and technique that blends the ancient medium of egg tempera on canvas with deliberate lines and forms that draw on East Asian calligraphy. Song explores the tensions between abstraction and figuration in her elusive paintings, which feature only a few motifs – ribbons of cloth tied around posts, clay pots, or neutral backdrops curtained by translucent fabric. 5 Brushstrokes I (2023) points toward the artist’s economy of gesture and material, naming the limited number of brushstrokes needed to complete the work.

Read more

Hyun-Sook Song (*1952, Damyang, Jeollanam-do, South Korea) lives and works in Hamburg. Selected solo and group exhibitions include Hamburger Kunsthalle, National Museum of Contemporary Art in Seoul, Gwangju Museum of Art, Poznan Biennale, Leeum Samsung Museum of Art, Seoul, Mori Art Museum, Tokyo, Asian Art Museum, San Francisco, Berkeley Art Museum, San Francisco, Deichtorhallen, Hamburg. Hyun-Sook Song’s work is included in the collections of institutions, such as Kunstmuseum Bern, Kunstmuseum Bonn, Hamburger Kunsthalle, Kunstmuseum Düsseldorf, Leeum-Samsung Museum of Modern Art, Mori Art Museum, Tokyo, Fukuoka Asian Art Museum, Seoul Museum of Art, Gwangju Art Museum, and Gyeonggido Museum of Art.

<p><b>Reinhard Mucha<br />
Achern</b>, 2024</p>
<p><b>Reinhard Mucha<br />
Achern</b>, 2024<br />
Metal shoulder clamps, alkyd enamel painted on reverse of float glass, aluminum profiles, <i>4 BOSCH zinc tubs</i> galvanized sheet steel <i>(found objects)</i>, mirror glass, plywood<br />
68.9 x 191.4 x 22.3 cm | 27 1/8 x 75 3/8 x 8 7/8 inches<br />
<b>© mucha</b><b><i>Archive</i></b></p>
<p><b>Reinhard Mucha<br />
Achern</b>, 2024<br />
Metal shoulder clamps, alkyd enamel painted on reverse of float glass, aluminum profiles, <i>4 BOSCH zinc tubs</i> galvanized sheet steel <i>(found objects)</i>, mirror glass, plywood<br />
68.9 x 191.4 x 22.3 cm | 27 1/8 x 75 3/8 x 8 7/8 inches<br />
<b>© mucha</b><b><i>Archive</i></b></p>
<p><b>Reinhard Mucha<br />
Achern</b>, 2024<br />
Metal shoulder clamps, alkyd enamel painted on reverse of float glass, aluminum profiles, <i>4 BOSCH zinc tubs</i> galvanized sheet steel <i>(found objects)</i>, mirror glass, plywood<br />
68.9 x 191.4 x 22.3 cm | 27 1/8 x 75 3/8 x 8 7/8 inches<br />
<b>© mucha</b><b><i>Archive</i></b></p>
<p><b>Reinhard Mucha<br />
Achern</b>, 2024<br />
Metal shoulder clamps, alkyd enamel painted on reverse of float glass, aluminum profiles, <i>4 BOSCH zinc tubs</i> galvanized sheet steel <i>(found objects)</i>, mirror glass, plywood<br />
68.9 x 191.4 x 22.3 cm | 27 1/8 x 75 3/8 x 8 7/8 inches<br />
<b>© mucha</b><b><i>Archive</i></b></p>
<p><b>Reinhard Mucha<br />
Achern</b>, 2024<br />
Metal shoulder clamps, alkyd enamel painted on reverse of float glass, aluminum profiles, <i>4 BOSCH zinc tubs</i> galvanized sheet steel <i>(found objects)</i>, mirror glass, plywood<br />
68.9 x 191.4 x 22.3 cm | 27 1/8 x 75 3/8 x 8 7/8 inches<br />
<b>© mucha</b><b><i>Archive</i></b></p>

Reinhard Mucha
Achern
, 2024
Metal shoulder clamps, alkyd enamel painted on reverse of float glass, aluminum profiles, 4 BOSCH zinc tubs galvanized sheet steel (found objects), mirror glass, plywood
68.9 x 191.4 x 22.3 cm | 27 1/8 x 75 3/8 x 8 7/8 inches
© muchaArchive

Reinhard Mucha
Achern
, 2024
Metal shoulder clamps, alkyd enamel painted on reverse of float glass, aluminum profiles, 4 BOSCH zinc tubs galvanized sheet steel (found objects), mirror glass, plywood


68.9 x 191.4 x 22.3 cm | 27 1/8 x 75 3/8 x 8 7/8 inches
© muchaArchive

Reinhard Mucha is one of the most influential German sculptors and conceptual artists of his generation. For decades, he has combined formal rigor and conceptual clarity with the richness and delicacy of painterly and sculptural details—always dependent on the subtly ironic. Achern, 2024, is exemplary of Mucha’s complex visual language and notion of sculpture that questions the medium’s boundaries as well as its historical and social significance. Like many of Mucha’s works, the enigmatic object takes its title—a German six-letter city name—from the painted train station signs of his expansive installation Wartesaal, [1997], [1986] 1979–1982. Achern, with its four metal trays mounted next to each other, operates within some of the strategies of Minimalism, yet simultaneously undermines them through its use of scrap material, with near-painterly markings left by the history of its usage.

Read more

The work’s mirrored back and glass plane surface reflect the space in front of it and therefore the conditions of its display, while simultaneously lending a quality of lightness and counteracting the metal’s heaviness. Letting personal history and previous works converge with an awareness of art historical discourse and other social systems, Mucha uses utilitarian and everyday materials to question the heroic standards of sculpture and open new perspectives.

Reinhard Mucha (*1950, Dusseldorf) lives in Dusseldorf. The comprehensive survey exhibition Der Mucha – An Initial Suspicion was on view at Kunstsammlung Nordrhein-Westfalen’s two locations K20 and K21 in Dusseldorf (2022–23). Other solo exhibitions include Kunstmuseum Basel (2016), ifa – Galerie Friedrichstraße, Berlin (1996), Museum Haus Esters, Krefeld (1990), Kunsthalle Basel (1987), Kunsthalle Bern (1987), Centre Georges Pompidou, Paris (1986), Württembergischer Kunstverein, Stuttgart (1985), and Kabinett für aktuelle Kunst, Bremerhaven (1983). He participated in Documenta X (1997), and Documenta IX (1992) and represented Germany at the 44th Venice Biennale (1990).

<p><b>Michail Pirgelis<br />
</b><i>A the Giant III</i>, 2024</p>
<p><b>Michail Pirgelis<br />
</b><i>A the Giant III</i>, 2024<br />
Aluminum, titanium, lacquer<br />
85 × 57 × 5 cm | 33 1/2 × 22 3/8 × 2 inches</p>
<p><b>Michail Pirgelis<br />
</b><i>A the Giant III</i>, 2024<br />
Aluminum, titanium, lacquer<br />
85 × 57 × 5 cm | 33 1/2 × 22 3/8 × 2 inches</p>
<p><b>Michail Pirgelis<br />
</b><i>A the Giant III</i>, 2024<br />
Aluminum, titanium, lacquer<br />
85 × 57 × 5 cm | 33 1/2 × 22 3/8 × 2 inches</p>
<p><b>Michail Pirgelis<br />
</b><i>A the Giant III</i>, 2024<br />
Aluminum, titanium, lacquer<br />
85 × 57 × 5 cm | 33 1/2 × 22 3/8 × 2 inches</p>
<p><b>Michail Pirgelis<br />
</b><i>A the Giant III</i>, 2024<br />
Aluminum, titanium, lacquer<br />
85 × 57 × 5 cm | 33 1/2 × 22 3/8 × 2 inches</p>
<p><b>Michail Pirgelis<br />
</b><i>A the Giant III</i>, 2024<br />
Aluminum, titanium, lacquer<br />
85 × 57 × 5 cm | 33 1/2 × 22 3/8 × 2 inches</p>
<p><b>Michail Pirgelis<br />
</b><i>A the Giant III</i>, 2024<br />
Aluminum, titanium, lacquer<br />
85 × 57 × 5 cm | 33 1/2 × 22 3/8 × 2 inches</p>

Michail Pirgelis
A the Giant III, 2024
Aluminum, titanium, lacquer
85 × 57 × 5 cm | 33 1/2 × 22 3/8 × 2 inches

Michail Pirgelis
A the Giant III, 2024
Aluminum, titanium, lacquer


85 × 57 × 5 cm | 33 1/2 × 22 3/8 × 2 inches

Over the past twenty years, German sculptor Michail Pirgelis has developed a unique and innovative artistic language, which updates the traditions of post-minimalism, the readymade and conceptual art while simultaneously resisting them. Working exclusively with discarded aerospace parts, Pirgelis sources his material from so-called aircraft boneyards often located in the deserts of California or Arizona and alters, rearranges, and abstracts the airplane parts into sculptures. A the Giant III (2024) illustrates the artist’s complex approach to his artistic source material. While the industrial nature of the work’s material recalls Minimalist sculptures such as those of Donald Judd, the graphic elements on its surface evoke fonts and logos of the airline industry, conjuring references to Pop art. With A the Giant III Pirgelis continues his incessant exploration of the limits of our understanding of objects, while radically expanding our experience of the sculptural.

Read more

Michail Pirgelis (*1976, Essen) lives and works in Cologne. Selected solo exhibitions include Fuhrwerkswaage and Odyssey, both Cologne (both 2022), Braunsfelder, Cologne (2019), Leopold-Hoesch-Museum, Dueren (2016), Autocenter, Berlin (2015) and Artothek, Cologne (2011). Selected group exhibitions include a.o. Wilhelm Hallen, Berlin (2022), Villa Sarre, Potsdam and byvier, Cologne (both 2021), Ludwig Forum, Aachen and Gewölbe, Cologne (both 2020), DuMont Kunsthalle, Cologne, Kunsthalle Nuremberg, Haus N, Athens and Riot, Ghent (all 2019), Athens Biennale, Kunstverein Reutlingen and Marta Herford (all 2018), Rubell Family Collection, Miami (2015), Istanbul Modern (2014), Bundeskunsthalle Bonn (2013), Museum Morsbroich, Leverkusen (2012), Thessaloniki Biennale (2011), Kunstmuseum Bonn (2010), and Stadtmuseum Düsseldorf (2005).

<p><b>Andreas Schulze<br />
</b><i>Untitled (At home)</i>, 2024</p>
<p><b>Andreas Schulze<br />
</b><i>Untitled (At home)</i>, 2024<br />
Acrylic on nettle cloth<br />
130 × 130 cm | 51 1/8 × 51 1/8 inches</p>
<p><b>Andreas Schulze<br />
</b><i>Untitled (At home)</i>, 2024<br />
Acrylic on nettle cloth<br />
130 × 130 cm | 51 1/8 × 51 1/8 inches</p>
<p><b>Andreas Schulze<br />
</b><i>Untitled (At home)</i>, 2024<br />
Acrylic on nettle cloth<br />
130 × 130 cm | 51 1/8 × 51 1/8 inches</p>
<p><b>Andreas Schulze<br />
</b><i>Untitled (At home)</i>, 2024<br />
Acrylic on nettle cloth<br />
130 × 130 cm | 51 1/8 × 51 1/8 inches</p>
<p><b>Andreas Schulze<br />
</b><i>Untitled (At home)</i>, 2024<br />
Acrylic on nettle cloth<br />
130 × 130 cm | 51 1/8 × 51 1/8 inches</p>

Andreas Schulze
Untitled (At home), 2024
Acrylic on nettle cloth
130 × 130 cm | 51 1/8 × 51 1/8 inches

Andreas Schulze
Untitled (At home), 2024
Acrylic on nettle cloth


130 × 130 cm | 51 1/8 × 51 1/8 inches

Andreas Schulze is one of the great individualists of German contemporary painting. His autonomous visual language questions our collective habits in colorful pictorial worlds that oscillate between abstraction and figuration and defamiliarize domestic objects, architectural forms and scenic landscapes alike. In Untitled (At home) (2024), Schulze expands on the idea of staging in both the dazzling world of entertainment and everyday life – a theme he explored in his 2023 solo exhibition On Stage (The Perimeter, London and Kunsthalle Nuremberg). The blue curtain that fills most of the canvas, together with the stage along the lower edge of the canvas, is a motif prevalent in Schulze’s work and plays with traditional trompe l’oeil painterly notions of presentation and performance, mystery and revelation, and questioning what is real. Schulze offers only a glimpse behind this façade to an ambiguous display of light, color and mechanics, leaving us to imagine this interior world just parallel to reality.

Read more

Andreas Schulze (*1955, Hanover) lives in Cologne. Selected solo exhibitions include The Perimeter, London (2023), Kunsthalle Nuremberg (2022), Fuhrwerkswaage, Cologne (2021), Kunsthalle Bielefeld (2018), Villa Merkel, Esslingen, which traveled to Kunstmuseum St. Gallen and Kunstmuseum Bonn (2014–15), Schirn Kunsthalle, Frankfurt am Main (2014), Falckenberg Collection, Hamburg and Leopold-Hoesch-Museum, Dueren (both 2010), Sprengel Museum, Hanover (1997) and Monika Sprüth Galerie, Cologne (1983). Group exhibitions include Centre d’art contemporain, Meymac (2020), Aishti Foundation, Beirut (2018), Groninger Museum, Groningen (2016), Städel Museum, Frankfurt am Main (2015), Deichtorhallen Hamburg (2000), Triennale di Milano (1997), Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York (1988), Museum of Modern Art, New York (1984), and The Tate Gallery, London (1983).

<p><b>Andreas Schulze<br />
</b><i>Untitled (Volume 2)</i>, 2024</p>
<p><b>Andreas Schulze<br />
</b><i>Untitled (Volume 2)</i>, 2024<br />
Acrylic on nettle cloth<br />
70 × 110 cm | 27 5/8 × 43 1/4 inches</p>
<p><b>Andreas Schulze<br />
</b><i>Untitled (Volume 2)</i>, 2024<br />
Acrylic on nettle cloth<br />
70 × 110 cm | 27 5/8 × 43 1/4 inches</p>
<p><b>Andreas Schulze<br />
</b><i>Untitled (Volume 2)</i>, 2024<br />
Acrylic on nettle cloth<br />
70 × 110 cm | 27 5/8 × 43 1/4 inches</p>
<p><b>Andreas Schulze<br />
</b><i>Untitled (Volume 2)</i>, 2024<br />
Acrylic on nettle cloth<br />
70 × 110 cm | 27 5/8 × 43 1/4 inches</p>
<p><b>Andreas Schulze<br />
</b><i>Untitled (Volume 2)</i>, 2024<br />
Acrylic on nettle cloth<br />
70 × 110 cm | 27 5/8 × 43 1/4 inches</p>

Andreas Schulze
Untitled (Volume 2), 2024
Acrylic on nettle cloth
70 × 110 cm | 27 5/8 × 43 1/4 inches

Andreas Schulze
Untitled (Volume 2), 2024
Acrylic on nettle cloth


70 × 110 cm | 27 5/8 × 43 1/4 inches

Schulze frequently combines abstract and figurative forms, drawing freely from Surrealism, Dadaism and Abstract Expressionism to produce otherworldly scenes in a style all his own. Untitled (Volume 2) (2024) features two round, protruding forms painted in grayscale and backed by an electric blue reminiscent of sky. Nestled between the two mounds is a curious, jewel-like object with cut gems, a strand of pearls, and gold chains – but its geometric forms also recall the brick walls and fences that populate so many of Schulze’s canvases. Is this a geologic formation topped with a sentimental ornament? Or a brooch resting between a décolleté? The work’s title, which refers to “Volume 2,” coyly suggests the continuation of an album or narrative, but leaves much room for the viewer to discover their own interpretation.

Read more

Andreas Schulze (*1955, Hanover) lives in Cologne. Selected solo exhibitions include The Perimeter, London (2023), Kunsthalle Nuremberg (2022), Fuhrwerkswaage, Cologne (2021), Kunsthalle Bielefeld (2018), Villa Merkel, Esslingen, which traveled to Kunstmuseum St. Gallen and Kunstmuseum Bonn (2014–15), Schirn Kunsthalle, Frankfurt am Main (2014), Falckenberg Collection, Hamburg and Leopold-Hoesch-Museum, Dueren (both 2010), Sprengel Museum, Hanover (1997) and Monika Sprüth Galerie, Cologne (1983). Group exhibitions include Centre d’art contemporain, Meymac (2020), Aishti Foundation, Beirut (2018), Groninger Museum, Groningen (2016), Städel Museum, Frankfurt am Main (2015), Deichtorhallen Hamburg (2000), Triennale di Milano (1997), Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York (1988), Museum of Modern Art, New York (1984), and The Tate Gallery, London (1983).

<p><b>Andreas Schulze<br />
</b><i>Untitled (Window Café Wien)</i>, 2023</p>
<p><b>Andreas Schulze<br />
</b><i>Untitled (Window Café Wien)</i>, 2023<br />
Acrylic on nettle cloth<br />
70 × 70 cm | 27 5/8 × 27 5/8 inches</p>
<p><b>Andreas Schulze<br />
</b><i>Untitled (Window Café Wien)</i>, 2023<br />
Acrylic on nettle cloth<br />
70 × 70 cm | 27 5/8 × 27 5/8 inches</p>
<p><b>Andreas Schulze<br />
</b><i>Untitled (Window Café Wien)</i>, 2023<br />
Acrylic on nettle cloth<br />
70 × 70 cm | 27 5/8 × 27 5/8 inches</p>
<p><b>Andreas Schulze<br />
</b><i>Untitled (Window Café Wien)</i>, 2023<br />
Acrylic on nettle cloth<br />
70 × 70 cm | 27 5/8 × 27 5/8 inches</p>
<p><b>Andreas Schulze<br />
</b><i>Untitled (Window Café Wien)</i>, 2023<br />
Acrylic on nettle cloth<br />
70 × 70 cm | 27 5/8 × 27 5/8 inches</p>
<p><b>Andreas Schulze<br />
</b><i>Untitled (Window Café Wien)</i>, 2023<br />
Acrylic on nettle cloth<br />
70 × 70 cm | 27 5/8 × 27 5/8 inches</p>
<p><b>Andreas Schulze<br />
</b><i>Untitled (Window Café Wien)</i>, 2023<br />
Acrylic on nettle cloth<br />
70 × 70 cm | 27 5/8 × 27 5/8 inches</p>

Andreas Schulze
Untitled (Window Café Wien), 2023
Acrylic on nettle cloth
70 × 70 cm | 27 5/8 × 27 5/8 inches

Andreas Schulze
Untitled (Window Café Wien), 2023
Acrylic on nettle cloth


70 × 70 cm | 27 5/8 × 27 5/8 inches

Schulze’s colorful compositions, which question our collective social and cultural habits, are the result of attentive observations of everyday surroundings, from domestic spaces to urban scenes to lush, natural vistas. Untitled (Window Café Wien) (2023), perfectly displays his unpretentious treatment of motifs that often go unnoticed. The thick frame of a small window creates the illusion of seeing outside (or inside) onto a hazy, nebulous view. A fundamental theme in the artist’s work is his reference to surrounding space. Schulze’s painting creates an architectural moment that blurs the lines between the interior and the exterior, evoking an expansive atmosphere that is familiar yet mystical. At the same time, his title evokes the bustling world of Viennese cafe culture, simultaneously transporting viewers to another time and place.

Read more

Andreas Schulze (*1955, Hanover) lives in Cologne. Selected solo exhibitions include The Perimeter, London (2023), Kunsthalle Nuremberg (2022), Fuhrwerkswaage, Cologne (2021), Kunsthalle Bielefeld (2018), Villa Merkel, Esslingen, which traveled to Kunstmuseum St. Gallen and Kunstmuseum Bonn (2014–15), Schirn Kunsthalle, Frankfurt am Main (2014), Falckenberg Collection, Hamburg and Leopold-Hoesch-Museum, Dueren (both 2010), Sprengel Museum, Hanover (1997) and Monika Sprüth Galerie, Cologne (1983). Group exhibitions include Centre d’art contemporain, Meymac (2020), Aishti Foundation, Beirut (2018), Groninger Museum, Groningen (2016), Städel Museum, Frankfurt am Main (2015), Deichtorhallen Hamburg (2000), Triennale di Milano (1997), Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York (1988), Museum of Modern Art, New York (1984), and The Tate Gallery, London (1983).

<p><b>Analia Saban<br />
</b><i>Woven Horizontal Gradient as Weft (Top to Bottom, Blue Values)</i>, 2024</p>
<p><b>Analia Saban<br />
</b><i>Woven Horizontal Gradient as Weft (Top to Bottom, Blue Values)</i>, 2024<br />
Woven acrylic paint and linen thread on panel<br />
204.5 × 174.6 × 5.4 cm | 80 1/2 × 68 3/4 × 2 1/8 inches</p>
<p><b>Analia Saban<br />
</b><i>Woven Horizontal Gradient as Weft (Top to Bottom, Blue Values)</i>, 2024<br />
Woven acrylic paint and linen thread on panel<br />
204.5 × 174.6 × 5.4 cm | 80 1/2 × 68 3/4 × 2 1/8 inches</p>
<p><b>Analia Saban<br />
</b><i>Woven Horizontal Gradient as Weft (Top to Bottom, Blue Values)</i>, 2024<br />
Woven acrylic paint and linen thread on panel<br />
204.5 × 174.6 × 5.4 cm | 80 1/2 × 68 3/4 × 2 1/8 inches</p>
<p><b>Analia Saban<br />
</b><i>Woven Horizontal Gradient as Weft (Top to Bottom, Blue Values)</i>, 2024<br />
Woven acrylic paint and linen thread on panel<br />
204.5 × 174.6 × 5.4 cm | 80 1/2 × 68 3/4 × 2 1/8 inches</p>
<p><b>Analia Saban<br />
</b><i>Woven Horizontal Gradient as Weft (Top to Bottom, Blue Values)</i>, 2024<br />
Woven acrylic paint and linen thread on panel<br />
204.5 × 174.6 × 5.4 cm | 80 1/2 × 68 3/4 × 2 1/8 inches</p>
<p><b>Analia Saban<br />
</b><i>Woven Horizontal Gradient as Weft (Top to Bottom, Blue Values)</i>, 2024<br />
Woven acrylic paint and linen thread on panel<br />
204.5 × 174.6 × 5.4 cm | 80 1/2 × 68 3/4 × 2 1/8 inches</p>

Analia Saban
Woven Horizontal Gradient as Weft (Top to Bottom, Blue Values), 2024
Woven acrylic paint and linen thread on panel
204.5 × 174.6 × 5.4 cm | 80 1/2 × 68 3/4 × 2 1/8 inches

Analia Saban
Woven Horizontal Gradient as Weft (Top to Bottom, Blue Values), 2024
Woven acrylic paint and linen thread on panel


204.5 × 174.6 × 5.4 cm | 80 1/2 × 68 3/4 × 2 1/8 inches

Analia Saban’s singular practice brings together opposing concepts into one work: two and three dimensions, painting and sculpture, digital and analog, industrial and handmade. Her series of woven paintings are no exception. To produce them, Saban weaves linen canvas with “threads” of paint, which she creates by drying thickly painted lines of acrylic into long, pliable strands. Using a Jacquard loom – half of which operates by computer, and half of which requires physical labor – she interlaces the paint with the linen into compositions that hover between representation and abstraction. Woven Horizontal Gradient as Weft (Top to Bottom, Blue Values) (2024) develops this series yet further with tonalities that shift between pale blue to a rich ultramarine.

Read more

Mesmerizing both in their symmetry and for their intricate process, Saban’s woven works remain in dialogue with the legacies of minimalist and monochromatic painting (including Agnes Martin, Robert Ryman and South American modernists, such as Hélio Oiticica and Mira Schendel), and at the same time reworks painterly conventions, incorporating elements of craft, design, and everyday materials and industries.

Analia Saban (*1980, Buenos Aires) lives and works in Los Angeles. Solo exhibitions include Modern Art Museum Fort Worth (2019), Qiao Space, Shanghai (2017), Blaffer Art Museum, Houston (2016), and Armory Center for the Arts, Pasadena (2014). Recent group exhibitions include National Gallery of Art, Washington, DC (2024), Los Angeles County Museum of Art (2023), Museum of Modern Art, New York (2023), Sheldon Museum of Art, Lincoln, NE (2022), The Warehouse, Dallas (2022), and Clark Art Institute, Williamstown, MA (2020). Her work has also been featured at Art Safiental 2018: Horizontal- Vertical (2018); NGV Triennial at National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne (2017), and the first Made in LA biennial at the Hammer Museum, Los Angeles (2012).

<p><b>Henni Alftan<br />
</b><i>Band-Aid</i>, 2024</p>
<p><b>Henni Alftan<br />
</b><i>Band-Aid</i>, 2024<br />
Oil on canvas<br />
50 × 61 cm | 19 3/4 × 24 inches</p>
<p><b>Henni Alftan<br />
</b><i>Band-Aid</i>, 2024<br />
Oil on canvas<br />
50 × 61 cm | 19 3/4 × 24 inches</p>
<p><b>Henni Alftan<br />
</b><i>Band-Aid</i>, 2024<br />
Oil on canvas<br />
50 × 61 cm | 19 3/4 × 24 inches</p>

Henni Alftan
Band-Aid, 2024
Oil on canvas
50 × 61 cm | 19 3/4 × 24 inches

Henni Alftan
Band-Aid, 2024
Oil on canvas


50 × 61 cm | 19 3/4 × 24 inches

The work of Henni Alftan stems from a deep engagement with the medium of painting, its methods and its histories. Her precise pictures of daily life are intimately familiar and yet remain mysteriously elusive, a result of the artist’s careful cropping and economy of means. In devising her compositions, Alftan is interested in how viewers perceive even the simplest lines and dabs of paint, which are inherently abstract, as something recognizable. In Band-Aid (2024), her curving, glistening black brushstrokes read immediately as hair; shadows under each lock generate a trompe l’oeil feeling of depth, despite the extreme flatness of the flesh-toned passages beneath them. The rectangular peach bandage, meanwhile, cuts across the canvas and adds an additional feeling of dimensionality. The information Alftan chooses to include or omit offers just enough to create the illusion of narrative while simultaneously dissolving the suggested scene into simple forms and color fields that reveal themselves through close observation.

Read more

Henni Alftan (*1979, Helsinki) lives and works in Paris. Institutional group exhibitions include those at Kiasma Museum of Contemporary Art, Helsinki (2023), Los Angeles County Museum of Art, Institute of Contemporary Art, Miami (both 2022), Centre d’Art Contemporain, Perpignan (2021), ENSA Limoges, École Nationale Supérieur d’Art (2020), Kuntsi Museum of Modern Art, Vaasa (2018), Hämeenlinna Art Museum, Finland and Musée des Beaux-Arts de Brest (both 2017), and Amos Anderson Art Museum (2015). Alftan’s works are included in the collections of the Helsinki Art Museum, Amos Rex, Helsinki, Institute of Contemporary Art, Miami, Hammer Museum, Los Angeles, Dallas Museum of Art, EMMA Espoo Museum of Modern Art, Finland, and the Kuntsi Museum of Modern Art, Vaasa.

<p><b>David Ostrowski<br />
</b><i>The Moral Life</i>, 2024</p>
<p><b>David Ostrowski<br />
</b><i>The Moral Life</i>, 2024<br />
Acrylic, lacquer and paper on canvas, wood<br />
101 × 71 cm | 39 3/4 × 28 inches (framed)</p>
<p><b>David Ostrowski<br />
</b><i>The Moral Life</i>, 2024<br />
Acrylic, lacquer and paper on canvas, wood<br />
101 × 71 cm | 39 3/4 × 28 inches (framed)</p>
<p><b>David Ostrowski<br />
</b><i>The Moral Life</i>, 2024<br />
Acrylic, lacquer and paper on canvas, wood<br />
101 × 71 cm | 39 3/4 × 28 inches (framed)</p>
<p><b>David Ostrowski<br />
</b><i>The Moral Life</i>, 2024<br />
Acrylic, lacquer and paper on canvas, wood<br />
101 × 71 cm | 39 3/4 × 28 inches (framed)</p>
<p><b>David Ostrowski<br />
</b><i>The Moral Life</i>, 2024<br />
Acrylic, lacquer and paper on canvas, wood<br />
101 × 71 cm | 39 3/4 × 28 inches (framed)</p>
<p><b>David Ostrowski<br />
</b><i>The Moral Life</i>, 2024<br />
Acrylic, lacquer and paper on canvas, wood<br />
101 × 71 cm | 39 3/4 × 28 inches (framed)</p>
<p><b>David Ostrowski<br />
</b><i>The Moral Life</i>, 2024<br />
Acrylic, lacquer and paper on canvas, wood<br />
101 × 71 cm | 39 3/4 × 28 inches (framed)</p>

David Ostrowski
The Moral Life, 2024
Acrylic, lacquer and paper on canvas, wood
101 × 71 cm | 39 3/4 × 28 inches (framed)

David Ostrowski
The Moral Life, 2024
Acrylic, lacquer and paper on canvas, wood


101 × 71 cm | 39 3/4 × 28 inches (framed)

Known for his minimalist abstract paintings, David Ostrowski continuously pursues the idea of total reduction in painting in a conscious rejection of painterly codes and traditions. In the artist’s owl paintings, including The Moral Life (2024), groups of owls are rendered in an array of visual styles. He approaches them like he does his abstractions: as pure shape and form that coalesce through line, gesture and color. With Ostrowski’s deft use of layering, overpainting and placement, they seem to be collaged to the work, or to emerge from the background, always bringing attention back to the painting’s surface.

Read more

David Ostrowski (*1981, Cologne) lives and works in Cologne. His solo exhibition Parliament will be on view at Sprüth Magers, New York from June 4, 2024. Other solo exhibitions include Fig., Tokyo and Ramiken, New York (both 2023), Lady Helen, London (2020, with Angharad Williams) Avant-Garde Institute, Warsaw (2020, with Tobias Spichtig), Jir Sandel, Copenhagen and Leeahn Gallery, Seoul (both 2020), Sundogs, Paris and Piece Unique, Cologne (both 2019), Wschód, Warsaw (2018); Halle 9 Kirowwerk, Leipzig and Blueproject Foundation, Barcelona (both 2017), Leopold-Hoesch-Museum, Düren (2016, with Michail Pirgelis), Arken Museum of Modern Art, Copenhagen and Kunstraum Innsbruck (both 2015), Rubell Family Collection, Miami and Fondazione Sandretto Re Rebaudengo, Turin (both 2014). Recent group exhibitions include Standard Oslo and Weiss Falk at XYZcollective, Tokyo (both 2023), Catherine Zeta, Cologne (2022), and Akademie der Künste, Berlin and Fuhrwerkswaage, Cologne (both 2021).

<p><b>Thea Djordjadze<br />
</b><i>Untitled</i>, 2024</p>
<p><b>Thea Djordjadze<br />
</b><i>Untitled</i>, 2024<br />
Wood, plaster, paint<br />
100 × 100 × 3.5 cm | 39 3/8 × 39 3/8 × 1 3/8 inches (framed)</p>
<p><b>Thea Djordjadze<br />
</b><i>Untitled</i>, 2024<br />
Wood, plaster, paint<br />
100 × 100 × 3.5 cm | 39 3/8 × 39 3/8 × 1 3/8 inches (framed)</p>
<p><b>Thea Djordjadze<br />
</b><i>Untitled</i>, 2024<br />
Wood, plaster, paint<br />
100 × 100 × 3.5 cm | 39 3/8 × 39 3/8 × 1 3/8 inches (framed)</p>
<p><b>Thea Djordjadze<br />
</b><i>Untitled</i>, 2024<br />
Wood, plaster, paint<br />
100 × 100 × 3.5 cm | 39 3/8 × 39 3/8 × 1 3/8 inches (framed)</p>
<p><b>Thea Djordjadze<br />
</b><i>Untitled</i>, 2024<br />
Wood, plaster, paint<br />
100 × 100 × 3.5 cm | 39 3/8 × 39 3/8 × 1 3/8 inches (framed)</p>
<p><b>Thea Djordjadze<br />
</b><i>Untitled</i>, 2024<br />
Wood, plaster, paint<br />
100 × 100 × 3.5 cm | 39 3/8 × 39 3/8 × 1 3/8 inches (framed)</p>
<p><b>Thea Djordjadze<br />
</b><i>Untitled</i>, 2024<br />
Wood, plaster, paint<br />
100 × 100 × 3.5 cm | 39 3/8 × 39 3/8 × 1 3/8 inches (framed)</p>

Thea Djordjadze
Untitled, 2024
Wood, plaster, paint
100 × 100 × 3.5 cm | 39 3/8 × 39 3/8 × 1 3/8 inches (framed)

Thea Djordjadze
Untitled, 2024
Wood, plaster, paint


100 × 100 × 3.5 cm | 39 3/8 × 39 3/8 × 1 3/8 inches (framed)

Thea Djordjadze’s paintings exemplify her diverse practice, which concerns itself with the poetics and particularities of space as well as the natural inclinations of her varied materials. Reminiscent of her upbringing in the country of Georgia, where she would spend time coloring maps of the country and its political borders, her paintings are formed from plaster with pigment incorporated into, and onto, their porous surfaces. The gestures, traces and indentations that result from this process give the works a distinctly anthropomorphic, embodied quality. Clearly abstract, works such as Untitled (2024) nevertheless invoke the artist’s presence and memory with its sweeping movements and fields of lush, evocative colors that recall the early twentieth-century abstractions of such artists as Wassily Kandinsky and Paul Klee. Djordjadze updates this tradition, emphasizing the physical and bodily aspects of her materials.

Read more

Thea Djordjadze (*1971, Tbilisi) lives and works in Berlin. Selected solo exhibitions include WIELS, Centre d’Art Contemporain, Brussels (2023), Musée d’Art Moderne et Contemporain (MAMC), Saint-Etienne (2022), Martin- Gropius-Bau, Berlin (2021), Kunst Museum Winterthur (2019), Portikus, Frankfurt am Main (2018), Pinakothek der Moderne, Staatliche Graphische Sammlung, Munich (2017), Secession Wien, Vienna (2016), MoMA PS1, New York (2016), South London Gallery (2015), MIT List Visual Arts Center, Cambridge, MA (2014), Aspen Art Museum (2013), Malmö Konsthall (2012), Kunsthalle Basel (2009) and Kunstverein Nürnberg/Albrecht Dürer Gesellschaft, Nuremberg (2008). In addition, important group exhibitions include Haus Mödrath, Kerpen, Germany (2023), Hamburger Bahnhof, Berlin (2022), Tai Kwun-Centre for Heritage and Arts, Hongkong (2020), Deichtorhallen Hamburg (2019), Triennale di Milano (2017), 56th and 55th Venice Biennale (2015, 2013), Documenta 13, Kassel (2012), and the 5th Berlin Biennale for Contemporary Art (2008).

<p><b>Nora Turato<br />
</b><i>and now… ME!!!!!!!</i>, 2024</p>
<p><b>Nora Turato<br />
</b><i>and now… ME!!!!!!!</i>, 2024<br />
Vitreous enamel on steel (4 parts)<br />
242 × 192 × 3 cm | 95 1/4 × 75 5/8 × 1 1/8 inches</p>
<p><b>Nora Turato<br />
</b><i>and now… ME!!!!!!!</i>, 2024<br />
Vitreous enamel on steel (4 parts)<br />
242 × 192 × 3 cm | 95 1/4 × 75 5/8 × 1 1/8 inches</p>
<p><b>Nora Turato<br />
</b><i>and now… ME!!!!!!!</i>, 2024<br />
Vitreous enamel on steel (4 parts)<br />
242 × 192 × 3 cm | 95 1/4 × 75 5/8 × 1 1/8 inches</p>
<p><b>Nora Turato<br />
</b><i>and now… ME!!!!!!!</i>, 2024<br />
Vitreous enamel on steel (4 parts)<br />
242 × 192 × 3 cm | 95 1/4 × 75 5/8 × 1 1/8 inches</p>
<p><b>Nora Turato<br />
</b><i>and now… ME!!!!!!!</i>, 2024<br />
Vitreous enamel on steel (4 parts)<br />
242 × 192 × 3 cm | 95 1/4 × 75 5/8 × 1 1/8 inches</p>

Nora Turato
and now… ME!!!!!!!, 2024
Vitreous enamel on steel (4 parts)
242 × 192 × 3 cm | 95 1/4 × 75 5/8 × 1 1/8 inches

Nora Turato
and now… ME!!!!!!!, 2024
Vitreous enamel on steel (4 parts)


242 × 192 × 3 cm | 95 1/4 × 75 5/8 × 1 1/8 inches

Utilizing text as her artistic source material, Nora Turato collates and dissects the cacophonous barrage of information we find ourselves confronted with daily. Funneling appropriated words, fragments and quotes into performances, books, enamel panels, installations, and video works, the artist arrives at captivating incantations that harness the essence and the nonsense of what collectively moves us. Turato’s interest in the aesthetic minutiae that influence our understanding of a visual world is underscored by her vitreous enamel panels that employ language both as content and medium. and now… ME!!!!!!! (2024), a new glossy four-part panel that reflects on today’s obsession with authenticity, stems from pool 6 – her latest installment of anthologies of colloquial speech and found text she compiles from a myriad of sources – through which the artist investigates the mechanisms of the anxiety-driven culture of self-optimization.

Read more

Nora Turato (*1991, Zagreb) lives and works in Amsterdam. She headlined Art on The Mart’s program with a commissioned work in spring 2024. In April 2024, she performed pool 6 at the Art Institute Chicago. Her performance, Cue The Sun, was commissioned by Performa and premiered in November 2023 during the Performa Biennial 2023 in New York. Recent solo exhibitions include Museum of Modern Art, New York (2022), Secession, Vienna (2021), Centre Pompidou, Paris, MGLC: International Centre of Graphic Arts, Ljubljana, and Sammlung Philara, Dusseldorf (all 2020), Serralves Museum of Contemporary Art, Porto (2019), Kunstmuseum Liechtenstein (2019), and Beursschouwburg, Brussels (2019).

<p><b>Thomas Scheibitz<br />
</b><i>Window</i>, 2024</p>
<p><b>Thomas Scheibitz<br />
</b><i>Window</i>, 2024<br />
Oil, vinyl and pigment marker on canvas<br />
180 × 160 cm | 70 7/8 × 63 inches</p>
<p><b>Thomas Scheibitz<br />
</b><i>Window</i>, 2024<br />
Oil, vinyl and pigment marker on canvas<br />
180 × 160 cm | 70 7/8 × 63 inches</p>
<p><b>Thomas Scheibitz<br />
</b><i>Window</i>, 2024<br />
Oil, vinyl and pigment marker on canvas<br />
180 × 160 cm | 70 7/8 × 63 inches</p>
<p><b>Thomas Scheibitz<br />
</b><i>Window</i>, 2024<br />
Oil, vinyl and pigment marker on canvas<br />
180 × 160 cm | 70 7/8 × 63 inches</p>
<p><b>Thomas Scheibitz<br />
</b><i>Window</i>, 2024<br />
Oil, vinyl and pigment marker on canvas<br />
180 × 160 cm | 70 7/8 × 63 inches</p>

Thomas Scheibitz
Window, 2024
Oil, vinyl and pigment marker on canvas
180 × 160 cm | 70 7/8 × 63 inches

Thomas Scheibitz
Window, 2024
Oil, vinyl and pigment marker on canvas


180 × 160 cm | 70 7/8 × 63 inches

Though his conceptual practice often draws on an archive of found images and art historical references, Scheibitz explores the boundaries of universality and invention, creating works that are defined by their visual ambiguity. Informed by the codes and systems that structure both the world and our understanding of it, the artist has developed a distinct and singular visual language at constant play between figuration and abstraction. He combines highly varied imagery according to formal and associative similarity. In a process that reduces and reformulates legible figuration until it obtains the character of an abstraction, each element becomes autonomous and self-contained. His latest work Window (2024) displays painterly fluorescent areas next to black slopes and peaks rendered with graphic precision, emphasizing the idea that we are dealing with a surrogate of nature. Scheibitz’s title, together with the work’s composition, offer a striking example of his investigations into the reciprocal relationship between visual and linguistic information.

Read more

Thomas Scheibitz (*1968, Radeberg) lives and works in Berlin. Selected solo exhibitions include Sprüth Magers London (2021), Museum Berggruen, Nationalgalerie – Staatliche Museen zu Berlin (2019), KINDL, Berlin (2018), Kunstmuseum Bonn (2018), Baltic Centre for Contemporary Art, Newcastle (2013), MMK, Frankfurt (2012), Collezione Maramotti, Reggio Emilia (2011), Museo de Arte de São Paulo (2010), Camden Arts Centre, London (2008), MUDAM, Luxembourg (2008), IMMA, Dublin (2007), Centre d’Art Contemporain, Geneva (2004), Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam (2001) and Kunstmuseum Winterthur (2001). Thomas Scheibitz represented Germany at the 51st Venice Biennale in 2005.

<p><b>Pamela Rosenkranz<br />
</b><i>Healer Scrolls (Pine Woods)</i>, 2024</p>
<p><b>Pamela Rosenkranz<br />
</b><i>Healer Scrolls (Pine Woods)</i>, 2024<br />
Pigment print, kirigami cut paper, tension, watercolor and perspex frame<br />
59.8 × 41.7 cm | 23 1/2 × 16 3/8 inches<br />
60.2 × 42.7 × 5.4 cm | 23 3/4 × 16 7/8 × 2 1/8 inches (framed)</p>
<p><b>Pamela Rosenkranz<br />
</b><i>Healer Scrolls (Pine Woods)</i>, 2024<br />
Pigment print, kirigami cut paper, tension, watercolor and perspex frame<br />
59.8 × 41.7 cm | 23 1/2 × 16 3/8 inches<br />
60.2 × 42.7 × 5.4 cm | 23 3/4 × 16 7/8 × 2 1/8 inches (framed)</p>
<p><b>Pamela Rosenkranz<br />
</b><i>Healer Scrolls (Pine Woods)</i>, 2024<br />
Pigment print, kirigami cut paper, tension, watercolor and perspex frame<br />
59.8 × 41.7 cm | 23 1/2 × 16 3/8 inches<br />
60.2 × 42.7 × 5.4 cm | 23 3/4 × 16 7/8 × 2 1/8 inches (framed)</p>
<p><b>Pamela Rosenkranz<br />
</b><i>Healer Scrolls (Pine Woods)</i>, 2024<br />
Pigment print, kirigami cut paper, tension, watercolor and perspex frame<br />
59.8 × 41.7 cm | 23 1/2 × 16 3/8 inches<br />
60.2 × 42.7 × 5.4 cm | 23 3/4 × 16 7/8 × 2 1/8 inches (framed)</p>
<p><b>Pamela Rosenkranz<br />
</b><i>Healer Scrolls (Pine Woods)</i>, 2024<br />
Pigment print, kirigami cut paper, tension, watercolor and perspex frame<br />
59.8 × 41.7 cm | 23 1/2 × 16 3/8 inches<br />
60.2 × 42.7 × 5.4 cm | 23 3/4 × 16 7/8 × 2 1/8 inches (framed)</p>
<p><b>Pamela Rosenkranz<br />
</b><i>Healer Scrolls (Pine Woods)</i>, 2024<br />
Pigment print, kirigami cut paper, tension, watercolor and perspex frame<br />
59.8 × 41.7 cm | 23 1/2 × 16 3/8 inches<br />
60.2 × 42.7 × 5.4 cm | 23 3/4 × 16 7/8 × 2 1/8 inches (framed)</p>

Pamela Rosenkranz
Healer Scrolls (Pine Woods), 2024
Pigment print, kirigami cut paper, tension, watercolor and perspex frame
59.8 × 41.7 cm | 23 1/2 × 16 3/8 inches
60.2 × 42.7 × 5.4 cm | 23 3/4 × 16 7/8 × 2 1/8 inches (framed)

Pamela Rosenkranz
Healer Scrolls (Pine Woods), 2024
Pigment print, kirigami cut paper, tension, watercolor and perspex frame


59.8 × 41.7 cm | 23 1/2 × 16 3/8 inches
60.2 × 42.7 × 5.4 cm | 23 3/4 × 16 7/8 × 2 1/8 inches (framed)

The practice of Pamela Rosenkranz encompasses sculpture, video, installation and painting and explores the unexpected connections between objects and ideas. Recalling Rosenkranz’s Healer – a robotic snake with reflective kirigami skin – the artist’s recent body of works on paper, Healer Scrolls, continues her inquiry into the archaic image of the serpent. Healer Scrolls (Pine Woods) (2024) draws on ancient kirigami cuts and folds to evoke a pattern that resembles the scales of a snake, playing with age-old assumptions and deep-seated evolutionary fears. Adding another layer of intrigue, the title references both the historic rolls of paper used to store information and the movement needed to navigate the internet’s sheer endless wealth of knowledge.

Read more

Pamela Rosenkranz (*1979, Uri, Switzerland) lives and works in Zurich. Selected solo exhibitions include the High Line, New York (2023–24), Kunsthaus Bregenz (2021), Kreuzgang Fraumünster, Zurich (2018), GAMeC, Bergamo (2017), Fondazione Prada, Milan (2017), Kunsthalle Basel (2012), Centre d’Art Contemporain, Geneva (2010) and the Swiss Institute, Venice (2009). Rosenkranz’s project Our Product was selected for the Swiss Pavilion at the 56th Venice Biennale in 2015. Other major international group exhibitions include the Okayama Art Summit (2019) and the 15th Biennale de Lyon (2019). Recent group shows were held at Deste Foundation, Hydra (2023), Kunstmuseum Winterthur and MIT List Visual Arts Center, Cambridge (both 2022), Schinkel Pavillon, Berlin, and Institute of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles (both 2021), Sharjah Art Foundation, Sharjah (2020), MMK – Museum für Moderne Kunst, Frankfurt am Main and Centre Georges Pompidou, Paris (all 2019).

<p><b>Astrid Klein<br />
</b><i>Untitled (la tentation le plus dangereuse…)</i>, 1979</p>
<p><b>Astrid Klein<br />
</b><i>Untitled (la tentation le plus dangereuse…)</i>, 1979<br />
Photowork<br />
175.5 × 124 cm | 69 × 48 7/8 inches<br />
188  × 137.5 × 5 cm | 74 × 54 1/8 × 2 inches (framed)<br />
Edition of 3 + 1 AP</p>
<p><b>Astrid Klein<br />
</b><i>Untitled (la tentation le plus dangereuse…)</i>, 1979<br />
Photowork<br />
175.5 × 124 cm | 69 × 48 7/8 inches<br />
188  × 137.5 × 5 cm | 74 × 54 1/8 × 2 inches (framed)<br />
Edition of 3 + 1 AP</p>
<p><b>Astrid Klein<br />
</b><i>Untitled (la tentation le plus dangereuse…)</i>, 1979<br />
Photowork<br />
175.5 × 124 cm | 69 × 48 7/8 inches<br />
188  × 137.5 × 5 cm | 74 × 54 1/8 × 2 inches (framed)<br />
Edition of 3 + 1 AP</p>
<p><b>Astrid Klein<br />
</b><i>Untitled (la tentation le plus dangereuse…)</i>, 1979<br />
Photowork<br />
175.5 × 124 cm | 69 × 48 7/8 inches<br />
188  × 137.5 × 5 cm | 74 × 54 1/8 × 2 inches (framed)<br />
Edition of 3 + 1 AP</p>
<p><b>Astrid Klein<br />
</b><i>Untitled (la tentation le plus dangereuse…)</i>, 1979<br />
Photowork<br />
175.5 × 124 cm | 69 × 48 7/8 inches<br />
188  × 137.5 × 5 cm | 74 × 54 1/8 × 2 inches (framed)<br />
Edition of 3 + 1 AP</p>

Astrid Klein
Untitled (la tentation le plus dangereuse…), 1979
Photowork
175.5 × 124 cm | 69 × 48 7/8 inches
188 × 137.5 × 5 cm | 74 × 54 1/8 × 2 inches (framed)
Edition of 3 + 1 AP

Astrid Klein
Untitled (la tentation le plus dangereuse…), 1979
Photowork


175.5 × 124 cm | 69 × 48 7/8 inches
188 × 137.5 × 5 cm | 74 × 54 1/8 × 2 inches (framed)
Edition of 3 + 1 AP

Astrid Klein, one of Germany’s most distinguished conceptual artists, has played a crucial role as a European counterpart to the American Pictures Generation since the late 1970s and is considered a female pioneer of large-scale photography. In her multilayered works, she combines artistic source material drawn from philosophy, literature, political discourse, and film – particularly European New Wave cinema – to establish fresh links of meaning. A striking example from one of her historical bodies of work, Untitled (la tentation le plus dangereuse…) (1979) features two images of Brigitte Bardot, taken from film magazines, both confronting the viewer in gaze or posture. As is characteristic in Klein’s work, Bardot is distinguished by her sensual femininity and erotic appeal, but also for playing sexually emancipated characters with inner strength.

Read more

Visible in the text at the lower right, the letter X has been a recurring symbol in Klein’s work from the start, expressing the pictorial nature of language within its manifold meaning, as it stands for underlining, crossing out, a placeholder or, through its visual association with a cross-stitch, for the principle of montage.

Astrid Klein (*1951, Cologne) lives and works in Cologne. Recent solo exhibitions include include Fuhrwerkswaage, Cologne (2023), Sammlung Falckenberg, Deichtorhallen Hamburg (2018), The Renaissance Society, Chicago (2017), KW Institute for Contemporary Art, Berlin (2005), Contemporary Art Center, Vilnius (2003), Hamburger Bahnhof, Berlin (2002), Neues Museum, Nuremberg (2001), Kunsthalle Bielefeld (1989), traveling exhibition by the Kestnergesellschaft, Hanover; ICA, London; Vienna Secession and Forum Stadtpark, Graz (all 1989), and the Museum of Contemporary Art, Seoul (1981). Klein participated in the 14th Sharjah Biennial (2019), Documenta 8 (1987), and the 42nd Venice Biennale (1986). Her works are in collections such as San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, Tate, National Museum of Art Osaka and Museum Ludwig, Cologne.

Art Basel 2024
June 13–16
Private View: June 11–12
Booth: 2.0 B19