Cao Fei
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Cao Fei
Nova 17, 2019
Inkjet print on paper
110 × 150 cm
43 1/4 × 59 inches
140 × 180 cm (framed)
55 1/8 × 70 7/8 inches (framed)
Edition of 7

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Cao Fei
Nova 17, 2019
Inkjet print on paper
110 × 150 cm
43 1/4 × 59 inches
140 × 180 cm (framed)
55 1/8 × 70 7/8 inches (framed)
Edition of 7

Cao Fei
Nova 17, 2019
Inkjet print on paper
110 × 150 cm
43 1/4 × 59 inches
140 × 180 cm (framed)
55 1/8 × 70 7/8 inches (framed)
Edition of 7

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FIAC Online Viewing Rooms

Cao Fei
Nova 17, 2019 (detail)

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Cao Fei
Nova 17, 2019 (installation view)

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China’s rapid urbanization over the last few decades has been a constant source of inspiration for acclaimed Chinese artist Cao Fei. Employing film, video and virtual reality (among other mediums), she explores the intersection between humanity and the digital age, often using the backdrop of her Beijing neighborhood as a setting. The artist’s newest feature-length film, Nova (2019), focuses on a computer scientist attempting to turn human beings into digital mediums; in this quest, the scientist experiments on his own son and accidentally transforms him into a virtual being trapped in cyberspace. As with all her video work, Cao Fei created an accompanying series of photographs for the film; in Nova 17 (2019), the scientist and his son gaze at each other through a floating window that acts as a portal between two disparate worlds. Wearing a space suit, the son fogs up his helmet as he gazes intently from a cosmic sky dappled with stars or space dust; the father peers through the looking glass from an unknown contemporary Chinese metropolis. Though a pane of glass separates them, they each reach a hand toward the other in an attempt to connect through time and space.

Cao Fei: Staging the Era, a major exhibition of the artist’s work, will be on view at UCCA Center for Contemporary Art, Beijing, March 12–June 6, 2021.

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Cao Fei
Nova 17, 2019 (detail)

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Cao Fei
Nova 17, 2019 (detail)

China’s rapid urbanization over the last few decades has been a constant source of inspiration for acclaimed Chinese artist Cao Fei. Employing film, video and virtual reality (among other mediums), she explores the intersection between humanity and the digital age, often using the backdrop of her Beijing neighborhood as a setting. The artist’s newest feature-length film, Nova (2019), focuses on a computer scientist attempting to turn human beings into digital mediums; in this quest, the scientist experiments on his own son and accidentally transforms him into a virtual being trapped in cyberspace. As with all her video work, Cao Fei created an accompanying series of photographs for the film; in Nova 17 (2019), the scientist and his son gaze at each other through a floating window that acts as a portal between two disparate worlds. Wearing a space suit, the son fogs up his helmet as he gazes intently from a cosmic sky dappled with stars or space dust; the father peers through the looking glass from an unknown contemporary Chinese metropolis. Though a pane of glass separates them, they each reach a hand toward the other in an attempt to connect through time and space.

Cao Fei: Staging the Era, a major exhibition of the artist’s work, will be on view at UCCA Center for Contemporary Art, Beijing, March 12–June 6, 2021.

Pamela Rosenkranz
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Pamela Rosenkranz
Express Nothing (Soothe Grass), 2021
Acrylic paint, emergency blanket
215 × 141 × 5.5 cm
84 5/8 × 55 1/2 × 2 1/8 inches

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Pamela Rosenkranz
Express Nothing (Soothe Grass), 2021
Acrylic paint, emergency blanket
215 × 141 × 5.5 cm
84 5/8 × 55 1/2 × 2 1/8 inches

Pamela Rosenkranz
Express Nothing (Soothe Grass), 2021
Acrylic paint, emergency blanket
215 × 141 × 5.5 cm
84 5/8 × 55 1/2 × 2 1/8 inches

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FIAC Online Viewing Rooms

Pamela Rosenkranz
Express Nothing (Soothe Grass), 2021 (detail)

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Pamela Rosenkranz
Express Nothing (Soothe Grass), 2021

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Pamela Rosenkranz
Express Nothing (Soothe Grass), 2021 (detail)

Pamela Rosenkranz is an artist deeply engaged with humanity’s influence on and commodification of the natural world and its resources. Through conceptual sculptures, paintings and installations, she has consistently tried to get to the crux of that sometimes tumultuous and toxic connection. Express Nothing (Soothe Grass) (2021) is a new addition to her ongoing series of paintings made on emergency blankets. Always one to emphasize the artist’s touch, Rosenkranz applies the paint with her hands, creating a pattern that resembles a field of grass crushed underfoot or softly caressed by swift hands. This work has a human presence in more ways than one: The emergency blanket, made to prevent hypothermia in emergency situations, becomes a marker for the bodies of thousands of migrants making perilous journeys across land and sea. Instead of hands brushing away grass, the marks on the painting’s surface could be seen as the frantic movements of someone hanging onto life with all their might. As the title may suggest, the normalization of these deadly crossings makes it easier for us to “express nothing” at the expense of our humanity.

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Pamela Rosenkranz
Express Nothing (Soothe Grass), 2021 (detail)

Pamela Rosenkranz is an artist deeply engaged with humanity’s influence on and commodification of the natural world and its resources. Through conceptual sculptures, paintings and installations, she has consistently tried to get to the crux of that sometimes tumultuous and toxic connection. Express Nothing (Soothe Grass) (2021) is a new addition to her ongoing series of paintings made on emergency blankets. Always one to emphasize the artist’s touch, Rosenkranz applies the paint with her hands, creating a pattern that resembles a field of grass crushed underfoot or softly caressed by swift hands. This work has a human presence in more ways than one: The emergency blanket, made to prevent hypothermia in emergency situations, becomes a marker for the bodies of thousands of migrants making perilous journeys across land and sea. Instead of hands brushing away grass, the marks on the painting’s surface could be seen as the frantic movements of someone hanging onto life with all their might. As the title may suggest, the normalization of these deadly crossings makes it easier for us to “express nothing” at the expense of our humanity.

Cindy Sherman
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Cindy Sherman
Untitled #614, 2019
Dye sublimation print
231.1 × 231.1 cm
91 × 91 inches
243.8 × 243.8 cm (framed)
96 × 96 in (framed)
Edition of 6 + 1 AP

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Cindy Sherman
Untitled #614, 2019
Dye sublimation print
231.1 × 231.1 cm
91 × 91 inches
243.8 × 243.8 cm (framed)
96 × 96 in (framed)
Edition of 6 + 1 AP

Cindy Sherman
Untitled #614, 2019
Dye sublimation print
231.1 × 231.1 cm
91 × 91 inches
243.8 × 243.8 cm (framed)
96 × 96 in (framed)
Edition of 6 + 1 AP

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Cindy Sherman
Untitled #614, 2019 (detail)

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Cindy Sherman
Untitled #614, 2019 (detail)

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Cindy Sherman
Untitled #614, 2019

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With her most recent photographic body of work, Cindy Sherman has embarked on a new trajectory within her long-standing practice. While she is most famous for investigating gender and sexuality by dressing up and posing as various feminine characters, here Sherman takes on the guise of manhood. In Untitled #614 (2019), the artist stands centered in front of a grand avenue of trees, hands in the pockets of the designer clothing that festoons each masculine character in this series. The figure looks like a modern aristocrat, resplendent in silk breeches and a heavily embroidered cloak. The lavish backdrop, created using digital technology, likewise conveys an impression of affluence and refinement. Renowned for her utilization of the male gaze, Sherman still strives to question traditionally masculine constructions of the world, but this time through the depiction of men themselves.

Tapestries, an exhibition of new works by Cindy Sherman, is currently on view at Sprüth Magers, Los Angeles, through May 1, 2021.

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Cindy Sherman
Untitled #614, 2019 (detail)

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Cindy Sherman
Untitled #614, 2019 (detail)

With her most recent photographic body of work, Cindy Sherman has embarked on a new trajectory within her long-standing practice. While she is most famous for investigating gender and sexuality by dressing up and posing as various feminine characters, here Sherman takes on the guise of manhood. In Untitled #614 (2019), the artist stands centered in front of a grand avenue of trees, hands in the pockets of the designer clothing that festoons each masculine character in this series. The figure looks like a modern aristocrat, resplendent in silk breeches and a heavily embroidered cloak. The lavish backdrop, created using digital technology, likewise conveys an impression of affluence and refinement. Renowned for her utilization of the male gaze, Sherman still strives to question traditionally masculine constructions of the world, but this time through the depiction of men themselves.

Tapestries, an exhibition of new works by Cindy Sherman, is currently on view at Sprüth Magers, Los Angeles, through May 1, 2021.

John Baldessari
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John Baldessari
The Fallen Easel, 1988
Color lithograph and screenprint on Arches 88, Ragcote, and aluminum; in 9 parts
188 × 241.3 cm
74 × 95 inches
Edition of 35 + 15 AP

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John Baldessari
The Fallen Easel, 1988
Color lithograph and screenprint on Arches 88, Ragcote, and aluminum; in 9 parts
188 × 241.3 cm
74 × 95 inches
Edition of 35 + 15 AP

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John Baldessari
The Fallen Easel, 1988 (installation view)

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John Baldessari
The Fallen Easel, 1988 (detail)

A superb example of John Baldessari’s framed compositions with multiple elements from the 1980s, The Fallen Easel (1988) is comprised of images from the artist’s vast archive of material, from film stills to adverts to other snippets of found imagery. His use of these photographic excerpts positions the work within the history of appropriation art, effectively examining the social and cultural influence of the mass media.

The unorthodox arrangement suggests the work’s own physical instability, with the title alluding to the ‘fall’ of easel painting from the apex of fine art to a grammar of simple formal decisions, as well as to the eponymous easel pictured in the tilted frame to the left. The gaps within the frames or within the images themselves, for example the coloured dots obscuring the faces of the three figures on the right, serve to underscore gaps in meaning, undermining expectations of how images function.

Many of Baldessari's works from this time were irregularly shaped, often using repetition, inversions and mirroring as a playful gesture of abstraction. This experimentation probed the role of image-as-language in everyday communication and perception.

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John Baldessari
The Fallen Easel, 1988 (detail)

A superb example of John Baldessari’s framed compositions with multiple elements from the 1980s, The Fallen Easel (1988) is comprised of images from the artist’s vast archive of material, from film stills to adverts to other snippets of found imagery. His use of these photographic excerpts positions the work within the history of appropriation art, effectively examining the social and cultural influence of the mass media.

The unorthodox arrangement suggests the work’s own physical instability, with the title alluding to the ‘fall’ of easel painting from the apex of fine art to a grammar of simple formal decisions, as well as to the eponymous easel pictured in the tilted frame to the left. The gaps within the frames or within the images themselves, for example the coloured dots obscuring the faces of the three figures on the right, serve to underscore gaps in meaning, undermining expectations of how images function.

Many of Baldessari's works from this time were irregularly shaped, often using repetition, inversions and mirroring as a playful gesture of abstraction. This experimentation probed the role of image-as-language in everyday communication and perception.

Jenny Holzer
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Jenny Holzer
Systems Taxonomy, 2019
Text: U.S. government document
Moon gold, palladium leaf, red gold leaf and oil on linen
79.1 × 91.4 × 3.8 cm
31 1/8 × 36 × 1 1/2 inches

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Jenny Holzer
Systems Taxonomy, 2019
Text: U.S. government document
Moon gold, palladium leaf, red gold leaf and oil on linen
79.1 × 91.4 × 3.8 cm
31 1/8 × 36 × 1 1/2 inches

Jenny Holzer
Systems Taxonomy, 2019
Text: U.S. government document
Moon gold, palladium leaf, red gold leaf and oil on linen
79.1 × 91.4 × 3.8 cm
31 1/8 × 36 × 1 1/2 inches

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FIAC Online Viewing Rooms

Jenny Holzer
Systems Taxonomy, 2019 (detail)

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Jenny Holzer
Systems Taxonomy, 2019 (detail)

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Jenny Holzer
Systems Taxonomy, 2019 (detail)

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Jenny Holzer
Systems Taxonomy, 2019

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Part political statement, part formalist work of art, Systems Taxonomy (2019) is a continuation of Jenny Holzer’s ongoing redaction painting series. Holzer began obtaining redacted US government documents released under the Freedom of Information Act in the early 2000s, a process that originated as an artistic reaction to the US invasion of the Middle East after 9/11. Holzer reproduces these declassified documents—most of which are heavily redacted—meticulously, silkscreening or tracing their contents onto canvases and then covering swathes of the surface in opulent metal leaf. By reproducing and enlarging the contents of these reports so carefully, Holzer brings attention to the deliberate erasure and concealment of information by the government. Systems Taxonomy features a page from a June 1999 report from the NSA Scientific Advisory Board on Digital Network Intelligence. Though you wouldn’t know it from the blank graph in Holzer’s work, this report focused on the government’s ability to gather intelligence by intercepting signals in interpersonal communication. As an artist whose work has always honored our deepest human emotions, Holzer uses Systems Taxonomy to make a statement about the control of information related to the tactics of power and war.

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Jenny Holzer
Systems Taxonomy, 2019 (detail)

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Jenny Holzer
Systems Taxonomy, 2019 (detail)

Part political statement, part formalist work of art, Systems Taxonomy (2019) is a continuation of Jenny Holzer’s ongoing redaction painting series. Holzer began obtaining redacted US government documents released under the Freedom of Information Act in the early 2000s, a process that originated as an artistic reaction to the US invasion of the Middle East after 9/11. Holzer reproduces these declassified documents—most of which are heavily redacted—meticulously, silkscreening or tracing their contents onto canvases and then covering swathes of the surface in opulent metal leaf. By reproducing and enlarging the contents of these reports so carefully, Holzer brings attention to the deliberate erasure and concealment of information by the government. Systems Taxonomy features a page from a June 1999 report from the NSA Scientific Advisory Board on Digital Network Intelligence. Though you wouldn’t know it from the blank graph in Holzer’s work, this report focused on the government’s ability to gather intelligence by intercepting signals in interpersonal communication. As an artist whose work has always honored our deepest human emotions, Holzer uses Systems Taxonomy to make a statement about the control of information related to the tactics of power and war.

George Condo
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George Condo
Linear Portrait, 2021
Aquarelle crayon on paper
76.2 × 56.5 cm
30 × 22 1/4 inches

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George Condo
Linear Portrait, 2021
Aquarelle crayon on paper
76.2 × 56.5 cm
30 × 22 1/4 inches

George Condo
Linear Portrait, 2021
Aquarelle crayon on paper
76.2 × 56.5 cm
30 × 22 1/4 inches

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FIAC Online Viewing Rooms

George Condo
Linear Portrait, 2021 (installation view)

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George Condo
Linear Portrait, 2021 (detail)

George Condo has developed a unique and celebrated pictorial language that synthesizes approaches from across the pantheon of Western art history. Combining elements of Old Master painting, Cubism, Surrealism, Pop Art and Abstract Expressionism with imagery from mass media, Condo has disrupted the continuity of the art historical canon even as he has secured his place within it. Drawing has always been crucial to the artist’s practice; the intimacy of the medium allows the flair of Condo's line to come to the fore, and it heightens the juxtaposition of the beautiful and the abject that is the cornerstone of his work. In Linear Portrait (2021), which illustrates what Condo calls his “psychological Cubism,” Condo unifies multiple divergent mental states into a single visage. The artist’s compositions often begin with the human figure—imaginary portraits that he undertakes with a passionate intensity. The faces are abbreviated and overlaid with lines, brushwork and fields of color that invoke the draftsmanship of the great 20th-century abstractionists. At once cartoonish, comical and grotesque, Condo's characters powerfully convey the full spectrum of human emotion as well as the complexity and contradictions of human life.

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George Condo
Linear Portrait, 2021 (detail)

George Condo has developed a unique and celebrated pictorial language that synthesizes approaches from across the pantheon of Western art history. Combining elements of Old Master painting, Cubism, Surrealism, Pop Art and Abstract Expressionism with imagery from mass media, Condo has disrupted the continuity of the art historical canon even as he has secured his place within it. Drawing has always been crucial to the artist’s practice; the intimacy of the medium allows the flair of Condo's line to come to the fore, and it heightens the juxtaposition of the beautiful and the abject that is the cornerstone of his work. In Linear Portrait (2021), which illustrates what Condo calls his “psychological Cubism,” Condo unifies multiple divergent mental states into a single visage. The artist’s compositions often begin with the human figure—imaginary portraits that he undertakes with a passionate intensity. The faces are abbreviated and overlaid with lines, brushwork and fields of color that invoke the draftsmanship of the great 20th-century abstractionists. At once cartoonish, comical and grotesque, Condo's characters powerfully convey the full spectrum of human emotion as well as the complexity and contradictions of human life.

Louise Lawler
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Louise Lawler
Ugolino, 1984
Black and white photograph
58.4 × 39.4 cm (image)
23 × 15 1/2 inches (image)
78.1 × 58.4 cm (framed)
30 3/4 × 23 inches (framed)
Edition of 5 + 1 AP

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Louise Lawler
Ugolino, 1984
Black and white photograph
58.4 × 39.4 cm (image)
23 × 15 1/2 inches (image)
78.1 × 58.4 cm (framed)
30 3/4 × 23 inches (framed)
Edition of 5 + 1 AP

Louise Lawler
Ugolino, 1984
Black and white photograph
58.4 × 39.4 cm (image)
23 × 15 1/2 inches (image)
78.1 × 58.4 cm (framed)
30 3/4 × 23 inches (framed)
Edition of 5 + 1 AP

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Louise Lawler
Ugolino, 1984 (detail)

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Louise Lawler
Ugolino, 1984 (installation view)

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Louise Lawler emerged from the Pictures Generation of the 1980s as a pioneering feminist artist concerned with issues of authorship and identity as they relate to works of art. Early in her career, she began using photography to capture artworks by other artists in locations ranging from private homes to expansive museum collections. Not mere documentation, Lawler's images emphasize the situational relationship between the artwork and its surroundings and, by extension, how the meaning of the artwork shifts depending on the context in which it is placed. In Ugolino (1984), Lawler photographs Jean-Baptiste Carpeaux’s Ugolino and His Sons in situ at The Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York. This Romantic marble sculpture depicts a canto from Dante’s Inferno that describes the misery of Count Ugolino della Gherardesca and his progeny, all of whom died of starvation while imprisoned in the late thirteenth century. The muscled figure of Ugolino stares moodily into the distance, while his four sons, clinging to his lower body, clamor desperately for his attention. Lawler’s lens captures the tortured look in Ugolino's eyes, but also the complex system of skylights that famously illuminate The Met's European art galleries.

 

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Louise Lawler
Ugolino, 1984 (detail)

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Louise Lawler
Ugolino, 1984 (detail)

Thomas Demand
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Thomas Demand
Canopy, 2020
C-print/Diasec
180 × 144 cm
70 7/8 × 56 3/4 inches
Edition of 6

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Thomas Demand
Canopy, 2020
C-print/Diasec
180 × 144 cm
70 7/8 × 56 3/4 inches
Edition of 6

Thomas Demand
Canopy, 2020
C-print/Diasec
180 × 144 cm
70 7/8 × 56 3/4 inches
Edition of 6

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FIAC Online Viewing Rooms

Thomas Demand
Canopy, 2020 (detail)

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Thomas Demand
Installation view, Thomas Demand, Sprüth Magers, London, 2021 (Photo: Ben Westoby)

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Thomas Demand
Canopy, 2020 (detail)

Thomas Demand’s work has long focused on detailed reenactments of specific and familiar places, public and private sites often loaded with sociopolitical meanings. Demand’s large-format photograph Canopy (2020) speaks of a moment in our current pandemic: A solitary balcony has its canopy fully extended, its inhabitants shielded not only from the harshness of the sun’s rays, but also the trouble in nature that has unfolded around them. The ordered seriality of the balconies is in contrast to the disorder beyond, as the world fails to contain a virulent disease. The work is a continuation of the artist’s practice in which he creates cardboard models before photographing and then destroying them; highly detailed, these life-sized models nonetheless retain subtle but deliberate flaws and anachronisms that challenge any complacent assumptions about photography’s claims to verisimilitude and authenticity.

Canopy is included in the artist’s current exhibition at Sprüth Magers, London.

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Thomas Demand
Canopy, 2020 (detail)

Thomas Demand’s work has long focused on detailed reenactments of specific and familiar places, public and private sites often loaded with sociopolitical meanings. Demand’s large-format photograph Canopy (2020) speaks of a moment in our current pandemic: A solitary balcony has its canopy fully extended, its inhabitants shielded not only from the harshness of the sun’s rays, but also the trouble in nature that has unfolded around them. The ordered seriality of the balconies is in contrast to the disorder beyond, as the world fails to contain a virulent disease. The work is a continuation of the artist’s practice in which he creates cardboard models before photographing and then destroying them; highly detailed, these life-sized models nonetheless retain subtle but deliberate flaws and anachronisms that challenge any complacent assumptions about photography’s claims to verisimilitude and authenticity.

Canopy is included in the artist’s current exhibition at Sprüth Magers, London.

David Ostrowski
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David Ostrowski
F (Herbert Grönemeyer), 2009/2021
Oil, acrylic and lacquer on canvas, wood
51 × 41 cm
20 × 16 1/8 inches

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David Ostrowski
F (Herbert Grönemeyer), 2009/2021
Oil, acrylic and lacquer on canvas, wood
51 × 41 cm
20 × 16 1/8 inches

David Ostrowski
F (Herbert Grönemeyer), 2009/2021
Oil, acrylic and lacquer on canvas, wood
51 × 41 cm
20 × 16 1/8 inches

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David Ostrowski
F (Herbert Grönemeyer), 2009/2021 (detail)

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David Ostrowski
F (Herbert Grönemeyer), 2009/2021 (installation view)

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Known for his minimalist abstract paintings, David Ostrowski consistently pursues the idea of total reduction—or “zero point”—in painting in a conscious rejection of painterly codes and traditions. The materials and palette of his newest body of work, which represents Ostrowski’s first systematic approach to the color gray, reflects this deliberate, radical reduction. Yet the apparent visual simplicity of these works is deceptive. Many, including F (Herbert Grönemeyer) (2009/2021), repurpose earlier canvases, which the artist paints over while leaving isolated shapes, layers and textures exposed. These passages enable a peek behind the gray facade and underscore the work’s sense of depth and three-dimensionality. The works’ titles combine Ostrowski’s typical F with the names of familiar, mainstream singers (in this case, one of Germany’s best-known recording artists). Like Ostrowski’s chosen technique and materials, these titles incorporate what is already existing and available such as the accessible music that surrounds everyday people, even the artist himself, who listens to this music in his studio. In the context of this past year, the color gray suggests the prevailing monotony of locked-down life, while also providing a neutral, and possibly hopeful, ground for whatever the future may hold.

David Ostrowski’s exhibition, So kalt kann es nicht sein / It can’t be that cold, is currently on view at Sprüth Magers, Berlin, through April 10, 2021.

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David Ostrowski
F (Herbert Grönemeyer), 2009/2021 (detail)

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David Ostrowski
F (Herbert Grönemeyer), 2009/2021 (detail)

Known for his minimalist abstract paintings, David Ostrowski consistently pursues the idea of total reduction—or “zero point”—in painting in a conscious rejection of painterly codes and traditions. The materials and palette of his newest body of work, which represents Ostrowski’s first systematic approach to the color gray, reflects this deliberate, radical reduction. Yet the apparent visual simplicity of these works is deceptive. Many, including F (Herbert Grönemeyer) (2009/2021), repurpose earlier canvases, which the artist paints over while leaving isolated shapes, layers and textures exposed. These passages enable a peek behind the gray facade and underscore the work’s sense of depth and three-dimensionality. The works’ titles combine Ostrowski’s typical F with the names of familiar, mainstream singers (in this case, one of Germany’s best-known recording artists). Like Ostrowski’s chosen technique and materials, these titles incorporate what is already existing and available such as the accessible music that surrounds everyday people, even the artist himself, who listens to this music in his studio. In the context of this past year, the color gray suggests the prevailing monotony of locked-down life, while also providing a neutral, and possibly hopeful, ground for whatever the future may hold.

David Ostrowski’s exhibition, So kalt kann es nicht sein / It can’t be that cold, is currently on view at Sprüth Magers, Berlin, through April 10, 2021.

Thea Djordjadze
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Thea Djordjadze
Untitled, 2020
Wood, plaster, paint
104 × 77.5 × 3.5 cm
41 × 30 1/2 × 1 3/8 inches

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Thea Djordjadze
Untitled, 2020
Wood, plaster, paint
104 × 77.5 × 3.5 cm
41 × 30 1/2 × 1 3/8 inches

Thea Djordjadze
Untitled, 2020
Wood, plaster, paint
104 × 77.5 × 3.5 cm
41 × 30 1/2 × 1 3/8 inches

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Thea Djordjadze
Untitled, 2020 (detail)

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Thea Djordjadze
Untitled, 2020 (detail)

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Thea Djordjadze
Untitled, 2020 (detail)

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Thea Djordjadze
Untitled, 2020 (detail)

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Thea Djordjadze
Untitled, 2020

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Thea Djordjadze's paintings exemplify her diverse practice, which concerns itself with the poetics and particularities of space as well as the natural inclinations of her varied materials. Reminiscent of her upbringing in the country of Georgia, where she would spend time coloring maps of the country and its political borders, her recent untitled paintings are formed from plaster, with pigment incorporated into and onto their porous surfaces. The gestures, traces and indentations that result from this process give the works a distinctly anthropomorphic, embodied quality. Clearly abstract, works such as Untitled (2020) nevertheless invoke the artist's presence and memory with their corporeal, sweeping movements and fields of lush, evocative colors. Here, a prismatic array of tones generates a vaporous atmosphere in a composition that recalls the early twentieth-century abstractions of such artists as Kandinsky, Klee, and Franz Marc. Djordjadze updates this tradition with new forms, emphasizing the physical and bodily aspects of her materials, which she allows to interact with and speak for themselves.

 

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Thea Djordjadze
Untitled, 2020 (detail)

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Thea Djordjadze
Untitled, 2020 (detail)

Barbara Kruger
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Barbara Kruger
Untitled (How can I be a better person?), 2011
Archival pigment print
81.3 × 127 cm
32 × 50 inches
84 × 129.8 cm (framed)
33 × 51 inches (framed)
Edition of 10

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Barbara Kruger
Untitled (How can I be a better person?), 2011
Archival pigment print
81.3 × 127 cm
32 × 50 inches
84 × 129.8 cm (framed)
33 × 51 inches (framed)
Edition of 10

Barbara Kruger
Untitled (How can I be a better person?), 2011
Archival pigment print
81.3 × 127 cm
32 × 50 inches
84 × 129.8 cm (framed)
33 × 51 inches (framed)
Edition of 10

Details
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The notion of questions and questioning, posed in direct address to the viewer, has played a central role in Barbara Kruger's work. Her 2011 series of text-based editions, which each feature a fundamental philosophical or ethical question, are thus emblematic of the artist’s practice not only visually but also conceptually. Across the series’ ten motifs, these range from self-help type concepts—"How can I be a better person?" and “Do I have to give up me to be loved by you?”—to more esoteric questions, including "Is there life without pain?," "Is blind idealism reactionary?" and "Are there animals in heaven?” Each phrase is rendered in stark white text, outlined in black, atop a vibrant array of colored and patterned backgrounds, which add yet another layer of information for viewers to consider. As ever, the aim is not to find explicit answers, but rather to encourage reflection upon one's own reactions to the artist's bold inquiries, which she poses to herself as well. Regardless of one’s politics, religion or worldview, Kruger’s questions urge us to push beyond our comfort zones to think clearly, critically and empathetically.

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Barbara Kruger
Untitled (How can I be a better person?), 2011 (installation view)

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Barbara Kruger
Untitled (How can I be a better person?), 2011 (installation view)

The notion of questions and questioning, posed in direct address to the viewer, has played a central role in Barbara Kruger's work. Her 2011 series of text-based editions, which each feature a fundamental philosophical or ethical question, are thus emblematic of the artist’s practice not only visually but also conceptually. Across the series’ ten motifs, these range from self-help type concepts—"How can I be a better person?" and “Do I have to give up me to be loved by you?”—to more esoteric questions, including "Is there life without pain?," "Is blind idealism reactionary?" and "Are there animals in heaven?” Each phrase is rendered in stark white text, outlined in black, atop a vibrant array of colored and patterned backgrounds, which add yet another layer of information for viewers to consider. As ever, the aim is not to find explicit answers, but rather to encourage reflection upon one's own reactions to the artist's bold inquiries, which she poses to herself as well. Regardless of one’s politics, religion or worldview, Kruger’s questions urge us to push beyond our comfort zones to think clearly, critically and empathetically.

Gary Hume
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Gary Hume
Mother’s Day, 2015
Gloss paint on aluminium
152.2 × 114.5 × 2.1 cm
60 × 45 × 1/4 inches

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Gary Hume
Mother’s Day, 2015
Gloss paint on aluminium
152.2 × 114.5 × 2.1 cm
60 × 45 × 1/4 inches

Gary Hume
Mother’s Day, 2015
Gloss paint on aluminium
152.2 × 114.5 × 2.1 cm
60 × 45 × 1/4 inches

FIAC Online Viewing Rooms
FIAC Online Viewing Rooms

Gary Hume
Mother’s Day, 2015 (detail)

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FIAC Online Viewing Rooms

Gary Hume
Mother's Day, 2015 (detail)

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Gary Hume
Mother’s Day, 2015

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Block Party, Installation view, The Arts Club, London, 2020 (Photo: Kate Elliott)

Gary Hume’s painting Mother’s Day (2015) stems from a body of work that presents abstracted visions of figures, objects and scenes recalled from Hume’s childhood or observed in family photographs. Often taking the artist’s mother as their subject, these works examine this mother-son relationship through time with emotional intimacy and familiarity. Mother's Day is executed in muted pastel purples and a rich ocher, and the block colors and deftness of line recall Japanese printmaking. Both the blossom and the mood are decidedly autumnal, perhaps in reference to the autumn of his mother’s life, with flowers most beautiful and seemingly full of life, just before they slowly wilt away. The work’s title suggests the vase of flowers is a gift he has presented to his mother—a snapshot of a present scenario or one Hume remembers from years gone by. This ambiguity, and the sensitivity of the narrative, draws the viewer into an intimate relationship with the work.

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Block Party, Installation view, The Arts Club, London, 2020 (Photo: Kate Elliott)

Gary Hume’s painting Mother’s Day (2015) stems from a body of work that presents abstracted visions of figures, objects and scenes recalled from Hume’s childhood or observed in family photographs. Often taking the artist’s mother as their subject, these works examine this mother-son relationship through time with emotional intimacy and familiarity. Mother's Day is executed in muted pastel purples and a rich ocher, and the block colors and deftness of line recall Japanese printmaking. Both the blossom and the mood are decidedly autumnal, perhaps in reference to the autumn of his mother’s life, with flowers most beautiful and seemingly full of life, just before they slowly wilt away. The work’s title suggests the vase of flowers is a gift he has presented to his mother—a snapshot of a present scenario or one Hume remembers from years gone by. This ambiguity, and the sensitivity of the narrative, draws the viewer into an intimate relationship with the work.

Cyprien Gaillard
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Cyprien Gaillard
Overburden, 2020
Aluminum honeycomb and limestone with stainless steel inlay
304.8 × 150 × 5.4 cm
120 × 59 1/16 × 2 1/8 inches

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Cyprien Gaillard
Overburden, 2020
Aluminum honeycomb and limestone with stainless steel inlay
304.8 × 150 × 5.4 cm
120 × 59 1/16 × 2 1/8 inches

Cyprien Gaillard
Overburden, 2020
Aluminum honeycomb and limestone with stainless steel inlay
304.8 × 150 × 5.4 cm
120 × 59 1/16 × 2 1/8 inches

FIAC Online Viewing Rooms
FIAC Online Viewing Rooms

Cyprien Gaillard
Overburden, 2020

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FIAC Online Viewing Rooms

Cyprien Gaillard
Overburden, 2020 (detail)

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FIAC Online Viewing Rooms

Cyprien Gaillard
Overburden, 2020 (detail)

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FIAC Online Viewing Rooms

Cyprien Gaillard
Overburden, 2020 (detail)

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Cyprien Gaillard
Overburden, 2020 (installation view)

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Concerned with the cyclical interactions between nature and human industry, Cyprien Gaillard finds layered undercurrents of history in present-day objects and situations, making unlikely connections across vast expanses of space and time. Overburden (2020) features swirling constellations of fossils embedded in an impossibly thin limestone panel that has been stamped with the New Jersey Transit rail line logo and mounted on an aluminum honeycomb substrate. These machine-made elements lend an industrial look to the sculpture, contrasting with the natural aura of the smoky black stone, whose fossils testify to the existence of prehistoric ocean beds and the creatures that dwelled within them. Appearing to grow outward from the wall like a layer of sediment atop the aluminum, the fossil-laden veneer mimics a natural growth overtaking an industrial ground. At once ancient and contemporary, natural and industrial, Overburden looks beyond the confines of human time frames toward the deep time of geological consciousness to consider a past that extends far beyond human existence, and perhaps a future that does as well.

Cyprien Gaillard’s films will be the focus of an in-depth presentation at the Mori Art Museum, Tokyo, April 22–September 26, 2021.

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Cyprien Gaillard
Overburden, 2020 (detail)

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Cyprien Gaillard
Overburden, 2020 (detail)

Concerned with the cyclical interactions between nature and human industry, Cyprien Gaillard finds layered undercurrents of history in present-day objects and situations, making unlikely connections across vast expanses of space and time. Overburden (2020) features swirling constellations of fossils embedded in an impossibly thin limestone panel that has been stamped with the New Jersey Transit rail line logo and mounted on an aluminum honeycomb substrate. These machine-made elements lend an industrial look to the sculpture, contrasting with the natural aura of the smoky black stone, whose fossils testify to the existence of prehistoric ocean beds and the creatures that dwelled within them. Appearing to grow outward from the wall like a layer of sediment atop the aluminum, the fossil-laden veneer mimics a natural growth overtaking an industrial ground. At once ancient and contemporary, natural and industrial, Overburden looks beyond the confines of human time frames toward the deep time of geological consciousness to consider a past that extends far beyond human existence, and perhaps a future that does as well.

Cyprien Gaillard’s films will be the focus of an in-depth presentation at the Mori Art Museum, Tokyo, April 22–September 26, 2021.

Andrea Zittel
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Andrea Zittel
Planar Studies: Vast and Specific #9, 2020
Watercolor and gouache on paper
58.4 × 76.2 cm
23 × 30 inches
74 × 94.3 cm (framed)
29 1/8 × 37 1/8 inches (framed)

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Andrea Zittel
Planar Studies: Vast and Specific #9, 2020
Watercolor and gouache on paper
58.4 × 76.2 cm
23 × 30 inches
74 × 94.3 cm (framed)
29 1/8 × 37 1/8 inches (framed)

Andrea Zittel
Planar Studies: Vast and Specific #9, 2020
Watercolor and gouache on paper
58.4 × 76.2 cm
23 × 30 inches
74 × 94.3 cm (framed)
29 1/8 × 37 1/8 inches (framed)

FIAC Online Viewing Rooms
FIAC Online Viewing Rooms

Andrea Zittel
Planar Studies: Vast and Specific #9, 2020 (detail)

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FIAC Online Viewing Rooms

Andrea Zittel
Planar Studies: Vast and Specific #9, 2020 (detail)

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Andrea Zittel
Planar Studies: Vast and Specific #9, 2020 (installation view)

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Andrea Zittel
Planar Studies: Vast and Specific #9, 2020 (detail)

Since the early 1990s, Andrea Zittel has used the arena of day-to-day life to develop and test prototypes for living structures and situations to understand the world at large. Her newest series of drawings hinge, in one way or another, on planar structures—flat rectangular elements that form the building blocks of so much of the reality that we construct around ourselves, from benches to bed frames to walkways. Planar Studies: Vast and Specific #9 (2020) depicts planar shapes lifted from print design, architecture and outdoor signage, superimposed on a delicately painted watercolor landscape that evokes the high-desert Joshua Tree region where the artist has lived for two decades. Earth-toned washes meld with streaks of pale violet and pink, adding a sublime, yet grounded, aura to the defined black-and-white planes. The rectangle, while almost totally absent in nature, has become the most ubiquitous shape not only within human manufacturing and standardization, but also for human organization and imagination.

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Andrea Zittel
Planar Studies: Vast and Specific #9, 2020 (detail)

Since the early 1990s, Andrea Zittel has used the arena of day-to-day life to develop and test prototypes for living structures and situations to understand the world at large. Her newest series of drawings hinge, in one way or another, on planar structures—flat rectangular elements that form the building blocks of so much of the reality that we construct around ourselves, from benches to bed frames to walkways. Planar Studies: Vast and Specific #9 (2020) depicts planar shapes lifted from print design, architecture and outdoor signage, superimposed on a delicately painted watercolor landscape that evokes the high-desert Joshua Tree region where the artist has lived for two decades. Earth-toned washes meld with streaks of pale violet and pink, adding a sublime, yet grounded, aura to the defined black-and-white planes. The rectangle, while almost totally absent in nature, has become the most ubiquitous shape not only within human manufacturing and standardization, but also for human organization and imagination.

Analia Saban
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Analia Saban
Woven Angle Gradient as Weft, Black (Three O’Clock), 2020
Woven acrylic paint and linen thread
182.9 × 171.5 × 5.7 cm
72 × 67 1/2 × 2 1/4 inches

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Analia Saban
Woven Angle Gradient as Weft, Black (Three O’Clock), 2020
Woven acrylic paint and linen thread
182.9 × 171.5 × 5.7 cm
72 × 67 1/2 × 2 1/4 inches

Analia Saban
Woven Angle Gradient as Weft, Black (Three O’Clock), 2020
Woven acrylic paint and linen thread
182.9 × 171.5 × 5.7 cm
72 × 67 1/2 × 2 1/4 inches

FIAC Online Viewing Rooms
FIAC Online Viewing Rooms

Analia Saban
Woven Angle Gradient as Weft, Black (Three O’Clock), 2020 (detail)

FIAC Online Viewing Rooms
FIAC Online Viewing Rooms

Analia Saban
Woven Angle Gradient as Weft, Black (Three O’Clock), 2020

FIAC Online Viewing Rooms
FIAC Online Viewing Rooms

Analia Saban
Woven Angle Gradient as Weft, Black (Three O’Clock), 2020

FIAC Online Viewing Rooms
FIAC Online Viewing Rooms

Analia Saban
Save As, Installation view, Sprüth Magers, Berlin, 2021 (Photo: Timo Ohler)

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Analia Saban
Woven Angle Gradient as Weft, Black (Three O’Clock), 2020

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Analia Saban works across a broad spectrum of media exploring how art objects are conceived, constructed and understood. In 2016, she acquired her first loom and set to work reinventing how paintings are made: Rather than applying paint on canvas, she began to weave dried, pliable “threads” of acrylic paint with linen threads, producing objects that hover between painting and sculpture. The plasticity of the acrylic contrasts with the natural, organic nature of the linen, producing intricate and meditative works that are nonetheless full of contradictions. The compositions of these woven works, including Woven Angle Gradient as Weft, Black (Three O’Clock) (2020), are often derived from Photoshop editing functions such as gradients and swipes. At once purely abstract, they also suggest the inner workings of machines, in this case the ticking hands of a clock. Here we see time stopped—an invitation to pause and reflect on our ubiquitous digital tools and the ways in which they transform our daily lives.

Analia Saban’s exhibition, Save As, is currently on view at Sprüth Magers, Berlin, through April 10, 2021.

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Analia Saban
Woven Angle Gradient as Weft, Black (Three O’Clock), 2020 (detail)

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Analia Saban
Woven Angle Gradient as Weft, Black (Three O’Clock), 2020 (detail)

Analia Saban works across a broad spectrum of media exploring how art objects are conceived, constructed and understood. In 2016, she acquired her first loom and set to work reinventing how paintings are made: Rather than applying paint on canvas, she began to weave dried, pliable “threads” of acrylic paint with linen threads, producing objects that hover between painting and sculpture. The plasticity of the acrylic contrasts with the natural, organic nature of the linen, producing intricate and meditative works that are nonetheless full of contradictions. The compositions of these woven works, including Woven Angle Gradient as Weft, Black (Three O’Clock) (2020), are often derived from Photoshop editing functions such as gradients and swipes. At once purely abstract, they also suggest the inner workings of machines, in this case the ticking hands of a clock. Here we see time stopped—an invitation to pause and reflect on our ubiquitous digital tools and the ways in which they transform our daily lives.

Analia Saban’s exhibition, Save As, is currently on view at Sprüth Magers, Berlin, through April 10, 2021.

John Waters
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John Waters
Reconstructed Lassie, 2012
C-print
76.2 × 50.8 cm
30 × 20 inches
92.7 × 67.3 cm (framed)
36 1/2 × 26 1/2 inches (framed)
Edition of 5 + 1 AP

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John Waters
Reconstructed Lassie, 2012
C-print
76.2 × 50.8 cm
30 × 20 inches
92.7 × 67.3 cm (framed)
36 1/2 × 26 1/2 inches (framed)
Edition of 5 + 1 AP

John Waters
Reconstructed Lassie, 2012
C-print
76.2 × 50.8 cm
30 × 20 inches
92.7 × 67.3 cm (framed)
36 1/2 × 26 1/2 inches (framed)
Edition of 5 + 1 AP

FIAC Online Viewing Rooms
FIAC Online Viewing Rooms

John Waters
Reconstructed Lassie, 2012 (installation view)

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FIAC Online Viewing Rooms

John Waters
Hollywood’s Greatest Hits, Installation view, Sprüth Magers, Los Angeles, 2021 (Photo: Robert Wedemeyer)

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John Waters
Indecent Exposure, Installation view, Baltimore Museum of Art, 2018—19 (Photo: BMA/The Baltimore Museum of Art, Mitro Hood)

The irreverent works of John Waters regularly skewer film and pop cultural tropes, while also offering cutting, but loving, critiques of mass media, celebrity and insider art-world knowledge. Reconstructed Lassie (2012) re-imagines the beloved animal from the long-running American film and television series from the 1950s and 1960s, in which the eponymous dog perpetually comes to the rescue in ever-more dramatic situations. Now, Lassie has succumbed to the same pressures facing every starlet and Beverly Hills housewife: to look young and beautiful, forever. Gone are the animal’s gentle eyes and soft features, replaced with comically arched eyebrows and an empty stare. Waters comments here on the social norms of the upper echelons of society, in which women undergo similar plastic surgeries and, over time, increasingly begin to look the same as one another. It is only a matter of time, Waters suggests, before these procedures become all the rage for the Fifis and Fidos of Rodeo Drive as well.

John Waters’ exhibition, Hollywood’s Greatest Hits, is currently on view at Sprüth Magers, Los Angeles, through May 1, 2021.

Details
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John Waters
Indecent Exposure, Installation view, Baltimore Museum of Art, 2018—19 (Photo: BMA/The Baltimore Museum of Art, Mitro Hood)

The irreverent works of John Waters regularly skewer film and pop cultural tropes, while also offering cutting, but loving, critiques of mass media, celebrity and insider art-world knowledge. Reconstructed Lassie (2012) re-imagines the beloved animal from the long-running American film and television series from the 1950s and 1960s, in which the eponymous dog perpetually comes to the rescue in ever-more dramatic situations. Now, Lassie has succumbed to the same pressures facing every starlet and Beverly Hills housewife: to look young and beautiful, forever. Gone are the animal’s gentle eyes and soft features, replaced with comically arched eyebrows and an empty stare. Waters comments here on the social norms of the upper echelons of society, in which women undergo similar plastic surgeries and, over time, increasingly begin to look the same as one another. It is only a matter of time, Waters suggests, before these procedures become all the rage for the Fifis and Fidos of Rodeo Drive as well.

John Waters’ exhibition, Hollywood’s Greatest Hits, is currently on view at Sprüth Magers, Los Angeles, through May 1, 2021.