George Condo
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George Condo
Of Mice and Men, 2008
Acrylic, charcoal, pastel and sand on paper
152.4 × 130.8 cm
60 × 51 1/2 inches

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George Condo
Of Mice and Men, 2008
Acrylic, charcoal, pastel and sand on paper
152.4 × 130.8 cm
60 × 51 1/2 inches

George Condo
Of Mice and Men, 2008
Acrylic, charcoal, pastel and sand on paper
152.4 × 130.8 cm
60 × 51 1/2 inches

Frieze London 2021 FAIR TEMPLATE
Frieze London 2021 FAIR TEMPLATE

George Condo
Of Mice and Men, 2008 (detail)

George Condo
Of Mice and Men, 2008 (detail)

Frieze London 2021 FAIR TEMPLATE
Frieze London 2021 FAIR TEMPLATE

George Condo
Of Mice and Men, 2008 (detail)

George Condo
Of Mice and Men, 2008 (detail)

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Frieze London 2021 FAIR TEMPLATE

George Condo
Of Mice and Men, 2008 (scale image)

George Condo
Of Mice and Men, 2008 (scale image)

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George Condo
Of Mice and Men, 2008 (detail)

Drawing has always been a crucial part of George Condo’s practice, incorporating the same virtuosic gestures and compositions as his paintings. The intimacy of the medium allows the flair of Condo’s line to come to the fore, and it heightens the juxtaposition of the beautiful and the grotesque that is the cornerstone of his work. His “psychological Cubism” attempts to visually depict the simultaneous and multiple competing moods and beliefs we experience moment to moment, creating imaginary, abstract portraits that capture the complex and often contradictory nature of human life. Of Mice and Men (2008) depicts just such a combination: a humanoid figure in military-style coat, who finds himself metamorphosing into a mouse. The title clearly references John Steinbeck’s 1937 literary masterpiece, and likely also the tale of human frailty and beauty that it conveys. The lines between man and animal blur as one face blends into and grows outward from the other. As with many of his other figural works, Condo strives for the depiction of character without the need for traditional—or realistic—figurative representation.

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George Condo
Of Mice and Men, 2008 (detail)

Drawing has always been a crucial part of George Condo’s practice, incorporating the same virtuosic gestures and compositions as his paintings. The intimacy of the medium allows the flair of Condo’s line to come to the fore, and it heightens the juxtaposition of the beautiful and the grotesque that is the cornerstone of his work. His “psychological Cubism” attempts to visually depict the simultaneous and multiple competing moods and beliefs we experience moment to moment, creating imaginary, abstract portraits that capture the complex and often contradictory nature of human life. Of Mice and Men (2008) depicts just such a combination: a humanoid figure in military-style coat, who finds himself metamorphosing into a mouse. The title clearly references John Steinbeck’s 1937 literary masterpiece, and likely also the tale of human frailty and beauty that it conveys. The lines between man and animal blur as one face blends into and grows outward from the other. As with many of his other figural works, Condo strives for the depiction of character without the need for traditional—or realistic—figurative representation.

Rosemarie Trockel
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Rosemarie Trockel
Color Assistant, 2018
Acrylic wool on canvas, plexi glass (grey)
60 × 60 cm
23 5/8 × 23 5/8 inches

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Rosemarie Trockel
Color Assistant, 2018
Acrylic wool on canvas, plexi glass (grey)
60 × 60 cm
23 5/8 × 23 5/8 inches

Rosemarie Trockel
Color Assistant, 2018
Acrylic wool on canvas, plexi glass (grey)
60 × 60 cm
23 5/8 × 23 5/8 inches

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Frieze London 2021 FAIR TEMPLATE

Rosemarie Trockel
Color Assistant, 2018

Rosemarie Trockel
Color Assistant, 2018

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Frieze London 2021 FAIR TEMPLATE

Rosemarie Trockel
Color Assistant, 2018 (scale image)

Rosemarie Trockel
Color Assistant, 2018 (scale image)

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With a focus on the conceptual implications of craft, Rosemarie Trockel challenges our narrowly conceived social norms regarding the idea of the male artistic genius, gender roles and cultural philosophies. Through myriad media, she explores the complex relationship between her chosen material and its implications of gendered stereotypes. Trockel first gained renown in the 1980s for her “knitting pictures,” wool works that were machine produced but whose materials were associated with women’s work and more traditionally feminine handicraft techniques. Color Assistant (2018) is a part of this ongoing body of works, updated for a new millennium: instead of working with a machine to produce these works, Trockel wraps loose strands of yarn around the canvas to form her geometric compositions. The pared down, abstract nature of the composition directly references the male-dominated world of twentieth-century abstraction and Minimalism, offering a female-driven alternative.

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Rosemarie Trockel
Color Assistant, 2018 (detail)

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Frieze London 2021 FAIR TEMPLATE

Rosemarie Trockel
Color Assistant, 2018 (detail)

With a focus on the conceptual implications of craft, Rosemarie Trockel challenges our narrowly conceived social norms regarding the idea of the male artistic genius, gender roles and cultural philosophies. Through myriad media, she explores the complex relationship between her chosen material and its implications of gendered stereotypes. Trockel first gained renown in the 1980s for her “knitting pictures,” wool works that were machine produced but whose materials were associated with women’s work and more traditionally feminine handicraft techniques. Color Assistant (2018) is a part of this ongoing body of works, updated for a new millennium: instead of working with a machine to produce these works, Trockel wraps loose strands of yarn around the canvas to form her geometric compositions. The pared down, abstract nature of the composition directly references the male-dominated world of twentieth-century abstraction and Minimalism, offering a female-driven alternative.

Gilbert & George
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Gilbert & George
DARWIN DAY, 2019
Mixed media
226 × 253 cm
89 × 99 5/8 inches

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Gilbert & George
DARWIN DAY, 2019
Mixed media
226 × 253 cm
89 × 99 5/8 inches

Gilbert & George
DARWIN DAY, 2019
Mixed media
226 × 253 cm
89 × 99 5/8 inches

Frieze London 2021 FAIR TEMPLATE
Frieze London 2021 FAIR TEMPLATE

Gilbert & George
DARWIN DAY, 2019 (detail)

Gilbert & George
DARWIN DAY, 2019 (detail)

Frieze London 2021 FAIR TEMPLATE
Frieze London 2021 FAIR TEMPLATE

Gilbert & George
DARWIN DAY, 2019 (detail)

Gilbert & George
DARWIN DAY, 2019 (detail)

Frieze London 2021 FAIR TEMPLATE
Frieze London 2021 FAIR TEMPLATE

Gilbert & George
DARWIN DAY, 2019 (scale image)

Gilbert & George
DARWIN DAY, 2019 (scale image)

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Gilbert & George
DARWIN DAY, 2019 (detail)

Under cover of their deceptively straightforward visual language, the famed artistic duo Gilbert & George have for over fifty years tackled critical, provocative subjects that tap into the deepest drives of contemporary society. Their works also reference disparate eras of cultural history, from nineteenth-century Romanticism to the pop milieu of science fiction and comic books. DARWIN DAY (2019) comes from their recent body of work THE PARADISICAL PICTURES, in which Gilbert & George appear amid a vivid array of psychedelically colored natural forms, including flowers, leaves, petals, fruits, tree limbs and branches. Individually, each picture presents a mesmeric world unto itself, replete with lush surfaces and vibrant hues, but likewise filled with references to aging and exhaustion. In DARWIN DAY, the artists are engulfed by giant mauve and brown petals, suggesting perhaps that plant life might be overtaking humanity in the course of evolution. Frequently the butt of their own jokes, the artists negate the myth of artistic genius and present themselves as fallible seekers of knowledge.

Details
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Gilbert & George
DARWIN DAY, 2019 (detail)

Under cover of their deceptively straightforward visual language, the famed artistic duo Gilbert & George have for over fifty years tackled critical, provocative subjects that tap into the deepest drives of contemporary society. Their works also reference disparate eras of cultural history, from nineteenth-century Romanticism to the pop milieu of science fiction and comic books. DARWIN DAY (2019) comes from their recent body of work THE PARADISICAL PICTURES, in which Gilbert & George appear amid a vivid array of psychedelically colored natural forms, including flowers, leaves, petals, fruits, tree limbs and branches. Individually, each picture presents a mesmeric world unto itself, replete with lush surfaces and vibrant hues, but likewise filled with references to aging and exhaustion. In DARWIN DAY, the artists are engulfed by giant mauve and brown petals, suggesting perhaps that plant life might be overtaking humanity in the course of evolution. Frequently the butt of their own jokes, the artists negate the myth of artistic genius and present themselves as fallible seekers of knowledge.

Jenny Holzer
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Jenny Holzer
Humor is a release, 2019
Text: Truisms (1977–79)
Oak Stone bench
43.2 × 121.9 × 50.8 cm
17 × 48 × 20 inches
Edition of 6 + 1 AP

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Jenny Holzer
Humor is a release, 2019
Text: Truisms (1977–79)
Oak Stone bench
43.2 × 121.9 × 50.8 cm
17 × 48 × 20 inches
Edition of 6 + 1 AP

Jenny Holzer
Humor is a release, 2019
Text: Truisms (1977–79)
Oak Stone bench
43.2 × 121.9 × 50.8 cm
17 × 48 × 20 inches
Edition of 6 + 1 AP

Frieze London 2021 FAIR TEMPLATE
Frieze London 2021 FAIR TEMPLATE

Jenny Holzer
Humor is a release, 2019 (detail)

Jenny Holzer
Humor is a release, 2019 (detail)

Frieze London 2021 FAIR TEMPLATE
Frieze London 2021 FAIR TEMPLATE

Jenny Holzer
Humor is a release, 2019 (detail)

Jenny Holzer
Humor is a release, 2019 (detail)

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Frieze London 2021 FAIR TEMPLATE

Jenny Holzer
Humor is a release, 2019

Jenny Holzer
Humor is a release, 2019

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Frieze London 2021 FAIR TEMPLATE

Jenny Holzer
Humor is a release, 2019 (detail)

Jenny Holzer
Humor is a release, 2019 (detail)

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Holzer began producing benches in the late 1980s after a commission for a sculpture garden in Minneapolis, and they have since been installed in locations worldwide as well as included in numerous public and private collections. With their simple design and attractive stone slabs, Holzer’s benches might be mistaken at first for another straightforward, commonplace element of landscape design. Yet the thought-provoking texts that she engraves upon them shift a viewer’s perspective immediately. The artist, who writes the texts herself, purposefully uses direct language that is open to interpretation, forcing anyone who encounters, reads, and sits on her benches to think about their own positions on the statements she offers. Holzer transforms an otherwise mundane experience into a moment for reflection—sometimes funny, sometimes serious, but always thoughtful.

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Jenny Holzer
Humor is a release, 2019 (detail)

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Frieze London 2021 FAIR TEMPLATE

Jenny Holzer
Humor is a release, 2019 (detail)

Holzer began producing benches in the late 1980s after a commission for a sculpture garden in Minneapolis, and they have since been installed in locations worldwide as well as included in numerous public and private collections. With their simple design and attractive stone slabs, Holzer’s benches might be mistaken at first for another straightforward, commonplace element of landscape design. Yet the thought-provoking texts that she engraves upon them shift a viewer’s perspective immediately. The artist, who writes the texts herself, purposefully uses direct language that is open to interpretation, forcing anyone who encounters, reads, and sits on her benches to think about their own positions on the statements she offers. Holzer transforms an otherwise mundane experience into a moment for reflection—sometimes funny, sometimes serious, but always thoughtful.

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Jenny Holzer
If I see POTUS, 2020
Text: U.S. government document
Etched copper panel
41.9 × 32.4 × 1.3 cm
16 1/2 × 12 3/4 × 1/2 inches
Edition of 3

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Jenny Holzer
If I see POTUS, 2020
Text: U.S. government document
Etched copper panel
41.9 × 32.4 × 1.3 cm
16 1/2 × 12 3/4 × 1/2 inches
Edition of 3

Jenny Holzer
If I see POTUS, 2020
Text: U.S. government document
Etched copper panel
41.9 × 32.4 × 1.3 cm
16 1/2 × 12 3/4 × 1/2 inches
Edition of 3

Frieze London 2021 FAIR TEMPLATE
Frieze London 2021 FAIR TEMPLATE

Jenny Holzer
If I see POTUS, 2020 (detail)

Jenny Holzer
If I see POTUS, 2020 (detail)

Frieze London 2021 FAIR TEMPLATE
Frieze London 2021 FAIR TEMPLATE

Jenny Holzer
If I see POTUS, 2020 (scale image)

Jenny Holzer
If I see POTUS, 2020 (scale image)

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Frieze London 2021 FAIR TEMPLATE

Jenny Holzer
If I see POTUS, 2020 (detail)

Jenny Holzer's primary medium is text, and since the late 1970s she has presented her penetrating phrases in various forms, from posters and LEDs to paintings and publicly projected works. If I see POTUS (2020) presents a new medium for Holzer: etched copper plates that bear the marks of various patinas applied in painterly gestures. The panel reproduces a page from Special Counsel Robert S. Mueller’s investigation of Russian interference in the 2016 US Presidential Election, released to the public under the Freedom of Information Act. We bear witness to text messages between Paul Manafort and an unidentified individual who asks permission to mention their relationship with Manafort when they next meet then-President Donald J. Trump. To create an etching, a metal plate is wounded, as it were, as each mark is permanently engraved. Together with the panel's patina, which calls to mind the passage of time, this document is thus etched as a wound into the history of the American people. Holzer's process of inscribing here recalls the inscriptions on her celebrated benches (1980s–present), as well as her harrowing project Lustmord (1993–94) that included phrases tattooed on skin recounting rapes and war crimes of the Balkan Wars.

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Jenny Holzer
If I see POTUS, 2020 (detail)

Jenny Holzer's primary medium is text, and since the late 1970s she has presented her penetrating phrases in various forms, from posters and LEDs to paintings and publicly projected works. If I see POTUS (2020) presents a new medium for Holzer: etched copper plates that bear the marks of various patinas applied in painterly gestures. The panel reproduces a page from Special Counsel Robert S. Mueller’s investigation of Russian interference in the 2016 US Presidential Election, released to the public under the Freedom of Information Act. We bear witness to text messages between Paul Manafort and an unidentified individual who asks permission to mention their relationship with Manafort when they next meet then-President Donald J. Trump. To create an etching, a metal plate is wounded, as it were, as each mark is permanently engraved. Together with the panel's patina, which calls to mind the passage of time, this document is thus etched as a wound into the history of the American people. Holzer's process of inscribing here recalls the inscriptions on her celebrated benches (1980s–present), as well as her harrowing project Lustmord (1993–94) that included phrases tattooed on skin recounting rapes and war crimes of the Balkan Wars.

Pamela Rosenkranz
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Pamela Rosenkranz
Egret White (To Be Free), 2014
Ralph Lauren acrylic latex paint (Egret) on emergency blanket
202.6 × 121.9 cm
79 3/4 × 48 inches

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Pamela Rosenkranz
Egret White (To Be Free), 2014
Ralph Lauren acrylic latex paint (Egret) on emergency blanket
202.6 × 121.9 cm
79 3/4 × 48 inches

Pamela Rosenkranz
Egret White (To Be Free), 2014
Ralph Lauren acrylic latex paint (Egret) on emergency blanket
202.6 × 121.9 cm
79 3/4 × 48 inches

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Frieze London 2021 FAIR TEMPLATE

Pamela Rosenkranz
Egret White (To Be Free), 2014 (detail)

Pamela Rosenkranz
Egret White (To Be Free), 2014 (detail)

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Frieze London 2021 FAIR TEMPLATE

Pamela Rosenkranz
Egret White (To Be Free), 2014 (detail)

Pamela Rosenkranz
Egret White (To Be Free), 2014 (detail)

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Frieze London 2021 FAIR TEMPLATE

Pamela Rosenkranz
Egret White (To Be Free), 2014

Pamela Rosenkranz
Egret White (To Be Free), 2014

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Pamela Rosenkranz investigates the systems by which people give meaning to the natural world. She creates conceptual, abstract sculptures, works on paper, videos and installations that nearly always reference the human figure by alluding to its condition as a malleable code that has been repeatedly hijacked by commercial marketing strategies and consumerism. The color schemes of global corporations, soft drinks, and mineral water brands feature heavily in Rosenkranz’s work. Egret White (To Be Free) (2014) stems from a body of work in which the artist paints gestural swathes of color atop metallic emergency blankets; in this case, in Ralph Lauren-brand house paint in "Egret White." Though abstract, this work's composition and its title are highly suggestive of the wingspan and movements of a bird. The human body—both its strengths and frailties—is also referenced through the use of the emergency blanket as an artistic support, whose gold tones give the work a rich, alchemical resonance.

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Pamela Rosenkranz
Egret White (To Be Free), 2014 (detail)

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Pamela Rosenkranz
Egret White (To Be Free), 2014 (detail)

Pamela Rosenkranz investigates the systems by which people give meaning to the natural world. She creates conceptual, abstract sculptures, works on paper, videos and installations that nearly always reference the human figure by alluding to its condition as a malleable code that has been repeatedly hijacked by commercial marketing strategies and consumerism. The color schemes of global corporations, soft drinks, and mineral water brands feature heavily in Rosenkranz’s work. Egret White (To Be Free) (2014) stems from a body of work in which the artist paints gestural swathes of color atop metallic emergency blankets; in this case, in Ralph Lauren-brand house paint in "Egret White." Though abstract, this work's composition and its title are highly suggestive of the wingspan and movements of a bird. The human body—both its strengths and frailties—is also referenced through the use of the emergency blanket as an artistic support, whose gold tones give the work a rich, alchemical resonance.

Sterling Ruby
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Sterling Ruby
MORTAR (7390), 2020
Ceramic
16.5 × 42.9 × 62.2 cm
6 1/2 × 16 7/8 × 24 1/2 inches

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Sterling Ruby
MORTAR (7390), 2020
Ceramic
16.5 × 42.9 × 62.2 cm
6 1/2 × 16 7/8 × 24 1/2 inches

Sterling Ruby
MORTAR (7390), 2020
Ceramic
16.5 × 42.9 × 62.2 cm
6 1/2 × 16 7/8 × 24 1/2 inches

Frieze London 2021 FAIR TEMPLATE
Frieze London 2021 FAIR TEMPLATE

Sterling Ruby
MORTAR (7390), 2020

Sterling Ruby
MORTAR (7390), 2020

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Frieze London 2021 FAIR TEMPLATE

Sterling Ruby
MORTAR (7390), 2020

Sterling Ruby
MORTAR (7390), 2020

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Frieze London 2021 FAIR TEMPLATE

Sterling Ruby
MORTAR (7390), 2020

Sterling Ruby
MORTAR (7390), 2020

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Frieze London 2021 FAIR TEMPLATE

Sterling Ruby
MORTAR (7390), 2020 (detail)

Sterling Ruby
MORTAR (7390), 2020 (detail)

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Frieze London 2021 FAIR TEMPLATE

Sterling Ruby
MORTAR (7390), 2020 (detail)

Sterling Ruby
MORTAR (7390), 2020 (detail)

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Frieze London 2021 FAIR TEMPLATE

Sterling Ruby
MORTAR (7390), 2020 (detail)

Sterling Ruby
MORTAR (7390), 2020 (detail)

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Frieze London 2021 FAIR TEMPLATE

Sterling Ruby
MORTAR (7390), 2020 (detail)

Sterling Ruby
MORTAR (7390), 2020 (detail)

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Frieze London 2021 FAIR TEMPLATE

Sterling Ruby
MORTAR (7390), 2020 (detail)

Sterling Ruby
MORTAR (7390), 2020 (detail)

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Sterling Ruby
MORTAR (7390), 2020 (detail)

Sterling Ruby’s wide-ranging, multidisciplinary work spans urethane and bronze sculptures, large-scale textile collages, hallucinatory color-field canvases and handmade ceramics. Together, they address the conflict between our individual desires and the social-cultural systems within which they circulate, as well as the influence of institutional architecture on human bodies, behavior and psychology. Ruby approaches clay from the angle of craft—he was raised in Pennsylvania Dutch country, in proximity to the carefully crafted objects of Amish communities—as well as for its physical and alchemical properties. His ceramic works seem always on the cusp of transformation, shifting from one state to another, and handmade traces are ever-present. In MORTAR (7390), Ruby plays on a classic ceramic form—the bowl—but twists it through the work's irregular shape and lustrous metallic glazing. A "mortar" can refer to a vessel (mortar & pestel), a building material (brick & mortar) and even a portable weapon, and these layers of reference, both physical and metaphorical, are essential to the artist's examination of how objects live and move among us.

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Sterling Ruby
MORTAR (7390), 2020 (detail)

Sterling Ruby’s wide-ranging, multidisciplinary work spans urethane and bronze sculptures, large-scale textile collages, hallucinatory color-field canvases and handmade ceramics. Together, they address the conflict between our individual desires and the social-cultural systems within which they circulate, as well as the influence of institutional architecture on human bodies, behavior and psychology. Ruby approaches clay from the angle of craft—he was raised in Pennsylvania Dutch country, in proximity to the carefully crafted objects of Amish communities—as well as for its physical and alchemical properties. His ceramic works seem always on the cusp of transformation, shifting from one state to another, and handmade traces are ever-present. In MORTAR (7390), Ruby plays on a classic ceramic form—the bowl—but twists it through the work's irregular shape and lustrous metallic glazing. A "mortar" can refer to a vessel (mortar & pestel), a building material (brick & mortar) and even a portable weapon, and these layers of reference, both physical and metaphorical, are essential to the artist's examination of how objects live and move among us.

Anne Imhof
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Anne Imhof
Untitled, 2021
Oil on printed canvas
160 × 210 cm
63 × 82 3/4 inches

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Anne Imhof
Untitled, 2021
Oil on printed canvas
160 × 210 cm
63 × 82 3/4 inches

Anne Imhof
Untitled, 2021
Oil on printed canvas
160 × 210 cm
63 × 82 3/4 inches

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Frieze London 2021 FAIR TEMPLATE

Anne Imhof
Untitled, 2021 (detail)

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Frieze London 2021 FAIR TEMPLATE

Anne Imhof
Untitled, 2021 (scale image)

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Anne Imhof has emerged as one of the most acclaimed artists of her generation. Her genre-spanning practice encompasses performance and choreography, painting and drawing, and installation and sculpture. Her poignant abstractions are often characterized by a keen interest in the human body, and though her work is inherently multifaceted and continues to expand into ever more media, Imhof conceives her art-making from the vantage point of painting. In Untitled (2021), Imhof breaks from her more ascetic, monochromatic canvases to embrace an explosion of orange forms. The mushroom-like cloud in the image has no discernible source, much like the explosions that have appeared in other prints of Imhof’s. While the left side of the canvas is light and diaphanous, the far right appears almost like a sunset, where impressionistic strokes of burnt orange converge with cloudy white smoke in the center. The cloud itself is texturally rich, and perhaps exists as another of Imhof's trenchant commentaries on the environmental impact of commodity culture in post-capitalistic western society.

 

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Anne Imhof
Untitled, 2021 (detail)

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Anne Imhof
Untitled, 2021 (detail)

Thomas Scheibitz
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Thomas Scheibitz
Game, 2021
Mixed media, colored
86 × 80 × 50 cm
33 7/8 × 31 1/2 × 19 3/4 inches

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Thomas Scheibitz
Game, 2021
Mixed media, colored
86 × 80 × 50 cm
33 7/8 × 31 1/2 × 19 3/4 inches

Thomas Scheibitz
Game, 2021
Mixed media, colored
86 × 80 × 50 cm
33 7/8 × 31 1/2 × 19 3/4 inches

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Thomas Scheibitz
Game, 2021

In a practice that creates intrigue by moving between the precipices of figuration and abstraction, and painting and sculpture, Scheibitz looks to these liminal spaces, drawing from both art historical references and his own vast archive of printed material to offer a complex visual lexicon of our time. The monochromatic cuboid forms that comprise Game (2021) perfectly encapsulate the artist's tendency toward abstract forms that nonetheless take on figural characteristics and a consequent sense of motion; in this case, the central, pale yellow column might be a body, with the smaller appendages standing in for legs. The title of the work also suggests a game piece, similar to chess, and thus brings up the notion of play and strategy. In Game, and throughout his varied works, Scheibitz makes palpable the certainty that things are never one-sided; that the world, or the image one makes of the world, remains unpredictable and therefore always unique.

Details
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Thomas Scheibitz
Game, 2021

In a practice that creates intrigue by moving between the precipices of figuration and abstraction, and painting and sculpture, Scheibitz looks to these liminal spaces, drawing from both art historical references and his own vast archive of printed material to offer a complex visual lexicon of our time. The monochromatic cuboid forms that comprise Game (2021) perfectly encapsulate the artist's tendency toward abstract forms that nonetheless take on figural characteristics and a consequent sense of motion; in this case, the central, pale yellow column might be a body, with the smaller appendages standing in for legs. The title of the work also suggests a game piece, similar to chess, and thus brings up the notion of play and strategy. In Game, and throughout his varied works, Scheibitz makes palpable the certainty that things are never one-sided; that the world, or the image one makes of the world, remains unpredictable and therefore always unique.

Analia Saban
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Analia Saban
Woven Angle Gradient as Weft, Cadmium Red Medium (Six O’Clock), 2021
Woven acrylic paint and linen thread on panel
165.7 × 178.4 × 5.7 cm
65 1/4 × 70 1/4 × 2 1/4 inches

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Analia Saban
Woven Angle Gradient as Weft, Cadmium Red Medium (Six O’Clock), 2021
Woven acrylic paint and linen thread on panel
165.7 × 178.4 × 5.7 cm
65 1/4 × 70 1/4 × 2 1/4 inches

Analia Saban
Woven Angle Gradient as Weft, Cadmium Red Medium (Six O’Clock), 2021
Woven acrylic paint and linen thread on panel
165.7 × 178.4 × 5.7 cm
65 1/4 × 70 1/4 × 2 1/4 inches

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Frieze London 2021 FAIR TEMPLATE

Analia Saban
Woven Angle Gradient as Weft, Cadmium Red Medium (Six O’Clock), 2021 (detail)

Analia Saban
Woven Angle Gradient as Weft, Cadmium Red Medium (Six O’Clock), 2021 (detail)

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Frieze London 2021 FAIR TEMPLATE

Analia Saban
Woven Angle Gradient as Weft, Cadmium Red Medium (Six O’Clock), 2021

Analia Saban
Woven Angle Gradient as Weft, Cadmium Red Medium (Six O’Clock), 2021

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In 2016, Analia Saban acquired her first loom and set to work reinventing how paintings are made: Rather than applying paint on canvas, she began to weave dried, pliable "threads" of acrylic paint with linen threads, producing alluring, meditative objects that hover between painting and sculpture. The plasticity of the acrylic contrasts with the natural, organic nature of the linen, and the compositions of these woven works, including Woven Angle Gradient as Weft, Cadmium Red Medium (Six O’Clock) (2021), are often derived from Photoshop editing functions such as gradients and swipes. At once purely abstract, they also suggest the inner workings of machines, in this case the ticking hands of a clock. Here we see time stopped—an invitation to pause and reflect on our ubiquitous digital tools and the ways in which they transform our daily lives. The bright cadmium composition also connects with global histories of abstraction, including in the United States and South America.

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Analia Saban
Woven Angle Gradient as Weft, Cadmium Red Medium (Six O’Clock), 2021 (detail)

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Analia Saban
Woven Angle Gradient as Weft, Cadmium Red Medium (Six O’Clock), 2021 (detail)

In 2016, Analia Saban acquired her first loom and set to work reinventing how paintings are made: Rather than applying paint on canvas, she began to weave dried, pliable "threads" of acrylic paint with linen threads, producing alluring, meditative objects that hover between painting and sculpture. The plasticity of the acrylic contrasts with the natural, organic nature of the linen, and the compositions of these woven works, including Woven Angle Gradient as Weft, Cadmium Red Medium (Six O’Clock) (2021), are often derived from Photoshop editing functions such as gradients and swipes. At once purely abstract, they also suggest the inner workings of machines, in this case the ticking hands of a clock. Here we see time stopped—an invitation to pause and reflect on our ubiquitous digital tools and the ways in which they transform our daily lives. The bright cadmium composition also connects with global histories of abstraction, including in the United States and South America.

Barbara Kruger
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Barbara Kruger
Untitled (Is there a perfect mate for everyone?), 2011
Archival pigment print
81.3 × 127 cm
32 × 50 inches
Edition of 10

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Barbara Kruger
Untitled (Is there a perfect mate for everyone?), 2011
Archival pigment print
81.3 × 127 cm
32 × 50 inches
Edition of 10

Barbara Kruger
Untitled (Is there a perfect mate for everyone?), 2011
Archival pigment print
81.3 × 127 cm
32 × 50 inches
Edition of 10

Details
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Barbara Kruger
Untitled (Is there a perfect mate for everyone?), 2011 (installation view)

The notion of questions and questioning, posed in direct address to the viewer, has played a central role in Barbara Kruger's work. Her 2011 series of text-based editions, which each feature a fundamental philosophical or ethical question, are thus emblematic of the artist’s practice not only visually but also conceptually. Across the series’ ten motifs, these range from self-help type concepts—"How can I be a better person?" and “Is there a perfect mate for everyone?”—to more esoteric questions, including "Are there animals in heaven?," and "Is blind idealism reactionary?" Each phrase is rendered in stark white text, outlined in black, atop a vibrant array of colored and patterned backgrounds, which add yet another layer of information for viewers to consider. As ever, the aim is not to find explicit answers, but rather to encourage reflection upon one's own reactions to the artist's bold inquiries, which she poses to herself as well. Regardless of one’s politics, religion or worldview, Kruger’s questions urge us to push beyond our comfort zones to think clearly, critically and empathetically.

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Barbara Kruger
Untitled (Is there a perfect mate for everyone?), 2011 (installation view)

The notion of questions and questioning, posed in direct address to the viewer, has played a central role in Barbara Kruger's work. Her 2011 series of text-based editions, which each feature a fundamental philosophical or ethical question, are thus emblematic of the artist’s practice not only visually but also conceptually. Across the series’ ten motifs, these range from self-help type concepts—"How can I be a better person?" and “Is there a perfect mate for everyone?”—to more esoteric questions, including "Are there animals in heaven?," and "Is blind idealism reactionary?" Each phrase is rendered in stark white text, outlined in black, atop a vibrant array of colored and patterned backgrounds, which add yet another layer of information for viewers to consider. As ever, the aim is not to find explicit answers, but rather to encourage reflection upon one's own reactions to the artist's bold inquiries, which she poses to herself as well. Regardless of one’s politics, religion or worldview, Kruger’s questions urge us to push beyond our comfort zones to think clearly, critically and empathetically.

Cao Fei
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Cao Fei
Nova 01, 2019
Inkjet print on paper
105 × 150 cm
41 3/8 × 59 inches
Edition of 7

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Cao Fei
Nova 01, 2019
Inkjet print on paper
105 × 150 cm
41 3/8 × 59 inches
Edition of 7

Cao Fei
Nova 01, 2019
Inkjet print on paper
105 × 150 cm
41 3/8 × 59 inches
Edition of 7

Frieze London 2021 FAIR TEMPLATE
Frieze London 2021 FAIR TEMPLATE

Cao Fei
Nova 01, 2019 (detail)

Cao Fei
Nova 01, 2019 (detail)

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Frieze London 2021 FAIR TEMPLATE

Cao Fei
Nova 01, 2019 (scale image)

Cao Fei
Nova 01, 2019 (scale image)

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Celebrated internationally for her wide-ranging multimedia work, Cao Fei regularly explores the intersections between humanity, technology, capital and the digital age—and in particular how these elements have come together in China’s rapid urbanization over the last few decades. Cao Fei’s work in video has been particularly influential, and alongside each of these projects she produces a related series of photographs. Nova (2019), her newest feature-length film, centers on a computer scientist who experiments on his son and accidentally transforms him into a virtual being trapped in cyberspace. Structured non-linearly, and incorporating both retro and futuristic elements, the film eschews any specific sense of time and moves cannily between reality and fantasy. Nova 01 (2019) captures the feeling of incongruity and alienation that runs both through the film and throughout Cao Fei’s work more broadly. Yet as the image also suggests, this ambiguous realm can also be a place of beauty and reflection.

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Cao Fei
Nova 01, 2019 (detail)

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Cao Fei
Nova 01, 2019 (detail)

Celebrated internationally for her wide-ranging multimedia work, Cao Fei regularly explores the intersections between humanity, technology, capital and the digital age—and in particular how these elements have come together in China’s rapid urbanization over the last few decades. Cao Fei’s work in video has been particularly influential, and alongside each of these projects she produces a related series of photographs. Nova (2019), her newest feature-length film, centers on a computer scientist who experiments on his son and accidentally transforms him into a virtual being trapped in cyberspace. Structured non-linearly, and incorporating both retro and futuristic elements, the film eschews any specific sense of time and moves cannily between reality and fantasy. Nova 01 (2019) captures the feeling of incongruity and alienation that runs both through the film and throughout Cao Fei’s work more broadly. Yet as the image also suggests, this ambiguous realm can also be a place of beauty and reflection.

Gary Hume
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Gary Hume
Swans I, 2021
Gloss paint on aluminium
214 × 151 cm
84 1/4 × 59 1/2 inches

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Gary Hume
Swans I, 2021
Gloss paint on aluminium
214 × 151 cm
84 1/4 × 59 1/2 inches

Gary Hume
Swans I, 2021
Gloss paint on aluminium
214 × 151 cm
84 1/4 × 59 1/2 inches

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Frieze London 2021 FAIR TEMPLATE

Gary Hume
Swans I, 2021 (detail)

Gary Hume
Swans I, 2021 (detail)

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Frieze London 2021 FAIR TEMPLATE

Gary Hume
Swans I, 2021 (detail)

Gary Hume
Swans I, 2021 (detail)

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Frieze London 2021 FAIR TEMPLATE

Gary Hume
Swans I, 2021 (detail)

Gary Hume
Swans I, 2021 (detail)

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Frieze London 2021 FAIR TEMPLATE

Gary Hume
Swans I, 2021

Gary Hume
Swans I, 2021

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Gary Hume
Swans I, 2021 (installation view)

Gary Hume rose to prominence as one of the most important and independent voices among the Young British Artists, an ambitious generation of artists graduating from London’s Goldsmiths College in the late 1980s. A restless innovator, he has in the years since become renowned for a richly varied repertoire of traditional painter’s subjects, such as the human figure, flowers and birds, as well as his unique visual language of bold, simplified forms that move deftly between figuration and abstraction. Working primarily with household gloss paint on aluminum, his paintings foreground surface and structure, with unexpected color combinations applied flatly and assuredly. Swans I (2021) is no exception: Here the craning necks of a bevy of swans curve and intersect across the picture plane, transforming the negative spaces into complex, abstract geometries. Understated additions of color articulate the swans’ features—a dab of muted ochre for an eye, pale olive for a beak—and testify to Hume’s painterly acuity and self-restraint.

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Gary Hume
Swans I, 2021 (installation view)

Gary Hume rose to prominence as one of the most important and independent voices among the Young British Artists, an ambitious generation of artists graduating from London’s Goldsmiths College in the late 1980s. A restless innovator, he has in the years since become renowned for a richly varied repertoire of traditional painter’s subjects, such as the human figure, flowers and birds, as well as his unique visual language of bold, simplified forms that move deftly between figuration and abstraction. Working primarily with household gloss paint on aluminum, his paintings foreground surface and structure, with unexpected color combinations applied flatly and assuredly. Swans I (2021) is no exception: Here the craning necks of a bevy of swans curve and intersect across the picture plane, transforming the negative spaces into complex, abstract geometries. Understated additions of color articulate the swans’ features—a dab of muted ochre for an eye, pale olive for a beak—and testify to Hume’s painterly acuity and self-restraint.

Louise Lawler
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Louise Lawler
Andy in L.A. (distorted for the times, three), 2004/2016/2019/2020
Digital Fujiflex mounted to Plexiglas on museum box
114.3 × 91.44 cm
45 × 36 inches
Edition of 5 + 1 AP

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Louise Lawler
Andy in L.A. (distorted for the times, three), 2004/2016/2019/2020
Digital Fujiflex mounted to Plexiglas on museum box
114.3 × 91.44 cm
45 × 36 inches
Edition of 5 + 1 AP

Louise Lawler
Andy in L.A. (distorted for the times, three), 2004/2016/2019/2020
Digital Fujiflex mounted to Plexiglas on museum box
114.3 × 91.44 cm
45 × 36 inches
Edition of 5 + 1 AP

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Frieze London 2021 FAIR TEMPLATE

Louise Lawler
Andy in L.A. (distorted for the times, three), 2004/2016/2019/2020

Louise Lawler
Andy in L.A. (distorted for the times, three), 2004/2016/2019/2020

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Photographs of artwork created by other artists have been the subject matter of Lawler’s oeuvre since the late 1970s. The artist’s practice involves complex photographic investigations of often overlooked or tacitly aesthetic forms of art experiences in museums, collections, auction houses or storage depots. Lawler’s work analyzes the conditions of exhibiting and the fate of objects—the “life” of the photographed artworks. It shows how their meaning changes with respective environments and forms of presentation and documents the market’s growing influence on developments in the art system. This restating of artworks in the present also includes a take on her own works, transferring them to different formats or distorting them. In 2017, she began applying digital filters to distort selected images and adding this process to the original title of the work. In Andy in L.A. (distorted for the times, three), Lawler returned to her 2004 photograph Andy in L.A., which shows an Andy Warhol self-portrait in a private collection in Los Angeles. The well-known photograph is now crossed by wavy lines; it seems like the image is in a fluid state, just before it dissolves completely. This abstract and disorienting effect destabilizes our comprehension of the image, aligning Lawler’s work with our present moment.

 

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Louise Lawler
Andy in L.A. (distorted for the times, three), 2004/2016/2019/2020 (detail)

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Louise Lawler
Andy in L.A. (distorted for the times, three), 2004/2016/2019/2020 (detail)

Karen Kilimnik
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Karen Kilimnik
The chinese pavillion in green park, 2007
Water soluble oil color on canvas
45.7 × 35.6 cm
18 × 14 inches

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Karen Kilimnik
The chinese pavillion in green park, 2007
Water soluble oil color on canvas
45.7 × 35.6 cm
18 × 14 inches

Karen Kilimnik
The chinese pavillion in green park, 2007
Water soluble oil color on canvas
45.7 × 35.6 cm
18 × 14 inches

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Frieze London 2021 FAIR TEMPLATE

Karen Kilimnik
The chinese pavillion in green park, 2007 (detail)

Karen Kilimnik
The chinese pavillion in green park, 2007 (detail)

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Frieze London 2021 FAIR TEMPLATE

Karen Kilimnik
The chinese pavillion in green park, 2007 (scale image)

Karen Kilimnik
The chinese pavillion in green park, 2007 (scale image)

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One of the most important representatives of figurative painting, sculpture, video and installation in the last four decades, Karen Kilimnik continues to produce work that is as wide-ranging as it is groundbreaking. The artist brings together historical cultural references—including ballet, the aristocracy and Romanticism—with the spheres of books, music, film and television. Her characters are recognizable to many from the realms of art and world history, fairy tales, pop charts or the pages of magazines, yet they are rendered surreal and often unnerving through the artist’s deft manipulations of both content and painterly material. In The chinese pavillion in green park (2007), we witness Kilimnik’s particular affinity for lush, decorative surfaces, filtered through her love of British art and urbane spaces. Kilimnik’s refined use of oil paint, vibrant approach to color and penchant for fantasy are apparent.

 

Thomas Demand
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Thomas Demand
Canopy, 2020
C-print/Diasec
180 × 144 cm
70 7/8 × 56 3/4 inches
Edition of 7

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Thomas Demand
Canopy, 2020
C-print/Diasec
180 × 144 cm
70 7/8 × 56 3/4 inches
Edition of 7

Thomas Demand
Canopy, 2020
C-print/Diasec
180 × 144 cm
70 7/8 × 56 3/4 inches
Edition of 7

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Frieze London 2021 FAIR TEMPLATE

Thomas Demand
Canopy, 2020 (detail)

Thomas Demand
Canopy, 2020 (detail)

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Frieze London 2021 FAIR TEMPLATE

Thomas Demand
Canopy, 2020 (detail)

Thomas Demand
Canopy, 2020 (detail)

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Thomas Demand’s work has long focused on detailed reenactments of specific and familiar places, public and private sites often loaded with sociopolitical meanings. Demand’s large-format photograph Canopy (2020) speaks of a moment in our current pandemic: A solitary balcony has its canopy fully extended, its inhabitants shielded not only from the harshness of the sun’s rays, but also the trouble in nature that has unfolded around them. The ordered seriality of the balconies is in contrast to the disorder beyond, as the world fails to contain a virulent disease. The work is a continuation of the artist’s practice in which he creates cardboard models before photographing and then destroying them; highly detailed, these life-sized models nonetheless retain subtle but deliberate flaws and anachronisms that challenge any complacent assumptions about photography’s claims to verisimilitude and authenticity.

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Thomas Demand
Canopy, 2020 (detail)

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Thomas Demand
Canopy, 2020 (detail)

Thomas Demand’s work has long focused on detailed reenactments of specific and familiar places, public and private sites often loaded with sociopolitical meanings. Demand’s large-format photograph Canopy (2020) speaks of a moment in our current pandemic: A solitary balcony has its canopy fully extended, its inhabitants shielded not only from the harshness of the sun’s rays, but also the trouble in nature that has unfolded around them. The ordered seriality of the balconies is in contrast to the disorder beyond, as the world fails to contain a virulent disease. The work is a continuation of the artist’s practice in which he creates cardboard models before photographing and then destroying them; highly detailed, these life-sized models nonetheless retain subtle but deliberate flaws and anachronisms that challenge any complacent assumptions about photography’s claims to verisimilitude and authenticity.

Bernd & Hilla Becher
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Bernd & Hilla Becher
Winding Tower, Merthyr Vale Colliery, Shaft 2, Aberavan, South Wales, GB, 1966
Silver-gelatin print
60 × 50 cm
23 5/8 × 19 3/4 inches
Edition of 5

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Bernd & Hilla Becher
Winding Tower, Merthyr Vale Colliery, Shaft 2, Aberavan, South Wales, GB, 1966
Silver-gelatin print
60 × 50 cm
23 5/8 × 19 3/4 inches
Edition of 5

Bernd & Hilla Becher
Winding Tower, Merthyr Vale Colliery, Shaft 2, Aberavan, South Wales, GB, 1966
Silver-gelatin print
60 × 50 cm
23 5/8 × 19 3/4 inches
Edition of 5

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Frieze London 2021 FAIR TEMPLATE

Bernd & Hilla Becher
Winding Tower, Merthyr Vale Colliery, Shaft 2, Aberavan, South Wales, GB , 1966 (scale image)

Bernd & Hilla Becher
Winding Tower, Merthyr Vale Colliery, Shaft 2, Aberavan, South Wales, GB , 1966 (scale image)

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Husband and wife duo Bernd & Hilla Becher began collaborating together in 1959 in Düsseldorf and spent the next five decades systematically photographing the disappearing industrial architecture found across Europe and North America. Their iconic black-and-white images of water towers, gas tanks, blast furnaces, grain elevators and other industrial facades were taken with a large-format camera and with an effort to remove stylistic intervention—this formulaic method to photography, coupled with the same frontal and three-quarter perspective, ensured visual kinship between similar structures while also allowing for the possibility of individual variation. Here, one photograph from their Winding Towers series depicts an example of this type of structure, located in the grassy knolls of the Welsh countryside. (Winding towers are the structural frames that sit above the opening into an underground mine shaft, holding the machinery in place.) The tower pictured, Winding Tower, Merthyr Vale Colliery, Shaft 2, Aberavan, South Wales, GB (1966), was soon after destroyed in the Aberfan disaster of 1966, when a mining colliery spoil tip engulfed the village of Aberfan and killed 144 people, 116 of them children at a local school. While this structure no longer remains, the photograph of it acts as a documentation of cultural heritage. The Bechers’ work is a testimony to the engineers and architects of heavy industry, as well as to the generations of people who used it; as a requiem for a lost world, these functional structures achieve a poignant beauty.

 

Michail Pirgelis
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Michail Pirgelis
Paradise Garage, 2017
Aluminium, fibreglass, titanium, tape
279 × 335 × 16 cm
109 7/8 × 132 × 6 1/4 inches

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Michail Pirgelis
Paradise Garage, 2017
Aluminium, fibreglass, titanium, tape
279 × 335 × 16 cm
109 7/8 × 132 × 6 1/4 inches

Michail Pirgelis
Paradise Garage, 2017
Aluminium, fibreglass, titanium, tape
279 × 335 × 16 cm
109 7/8 × 132 × 6 1/4 inches

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Frieze London 2021 FAIR TEMPLATE

Michail Pirgelis
Paradise Garage, 2017 (detail)

Michail Pirgelis
Paradise Garage, 2017 (detail)

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Frieze London 2021 FAIR TEMPLATE

Michail Pirgelis
Paradise Garage, 2017 (scale image)

Michail Pirgelis
Paradise Garage, 2017 (scale image)

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Michail Pirgelis’ unique artistic language oscillates between sculpture, painting and installation. The objects that comprise his works are often found materials from aircraft cemeteries in California and Arizona. Though he sometimes sands and polishes certain sections, his main artistic task consists in finding the right “section”—the right cut—and the viewer essentially bears witness to a surface marked by signs of wear and weather, by the sun and desert storms. Paradise Garage (2017) consists of a composite of various floor panels from different airlines, elements normally concealed under the carpet in an airplane’s passenger area. Just as the panels’ varying hues, exposed glue remnants and drill holes bring to mind a well-trodden studio floor, vertical stripes formed by the technical remnants of what were once rows of seats evoke associations with Barnett Newman-style abstract minimalism and color field painting. Its motif recalls a door: imagery that appears to open the wall visually and redefine it in space.

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Michail Pirgelis
Paradise Garage, 2017 (installation view)

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Michail Pirgelis
Paradise Garage, 2017 (installation view)

Michail Pirgelis’ unique artistic language oscillates between sculpture, painting and installation. The objects that comprise his works are often found materials from aircraft cemeteries in California and Arizona. Though he sometimes sands and polishes certain sections, his main artistic task consists in finding the right “section”—the right cut—and the viewer essentially bears witness to a surface marked by signs of wear and weather, by the sun and desert storms. Paradise Garage (2017) consists of a composite of various floor panels from different airlines, elements normally concealed under the carpet in an airplane’s passenger area. Just as the panels’ varying hues, exposed glue remnants and drill holes bring to mind a well-trodden studio floor, vertical stripes formed by the technical remnants of what were once rows of seats evoke associations with Barnett Newman-style abstract minimalism and color field painting. Its motif recalls a door: imagery that appears to open the wall visually and redefine it in space.