Bernd & Hilla Becher
Frieze London

Bernd & Hilla Becher
Grain Elevators, 1977-1991
16 silver-gelatin prints
Each: 46 × 56 cm (framed)
Overall: 189 × 229 cm (framed)
Each: 18 × 22 inches (framed)
Overall: 74 3/8 × 90 1/8 inches (framed)

1. Milwaukee, Wisconsin, USA 1978
2. Calumet, Illinois, USA 1978
3. Milwaukee, Wisconsin, USA 1978
4. Chebanse, Illinois, USA 1977
5. Findlay, Ohio, USA 1978
6. Toledo, Ohio, USA 1978
7. Onarga, Illinois, USA 1982
8. Van Wert, Ohio, USA 1982
9. Roberts, Illinois, USA 1982
10. Rothenburg o. T., D 1991
11. Eschweiler/Aachen, D 1989
12. Pemberville, Ohio, USA 1982
13. Clifton, Illinois, USA 1977
14. Strasbourg, F 1989
15. Canton, Ohio, USA 1977
16. Steeden/Limburg, D 1991

 

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Bernd & Hilla Becher
Grain Elevators, 1977-1991
16 silver-gelatin prints
Each: 46 × 56 cm (framed)
Overall: 189 × 229 cm (framed)
Each: 18 × 22 inches (framed)
Overall: 74 3/8 × 90 1/8 inches (framed)

1. Milwaukee, Wisconsin, USA 1978
2. Calumet, Illinois, USA 1978
3. Milwaukee, Wisconsin, USA 1978
4. Chebanse, Illinois, USA 1977
5. Findlay, Ohio, USA 1978
6. Toledo, Ohio, USA 1978
7. Onarga, Illinois, USA 1982
8. Van Wert, Ohio, USA 1982
9. Roberts, Illinois, USA 1982
10. Rothenburg o. T., D 1991
11. Eschweiler/Aachen, D 1989
12. Pemberville, Ohio, USA 1982
13. Clifton, Illinois, USA 1977
14. Strasbourg, F 1989
15. Canton, Ohio, USA 1977
16. Steeden/Limburg, D 1991

 

Bernd & Hilla Becher
Grain Elevators, 1977-1991
16 silver-gelatin prints
Each: 46 × 56 cm (framed)
Overall: 189 × 229 cm (framed)
Each: 18 × 22 inches (framed)
Overall: 74 3/8 × 90 1/8 inches (framed)

1. Milwaukee, Wisconsin, USA 1978
2. Calumet, Illinois, USA 1978
3. Milwaukee, Wisconsin, USA 1978
4. Chebanse, Illinois, USA 1977
5. Findlay, Ohio, USA 1978
6. Toledo, Ohio, USA 1978
7. Onarga, Illinois, USA 1982
8. Van Wert, Ohio, USA 1982
9. Roberts, Illinois, USA 1982
10. Rothenburg o. T., D 1991
11. Eschweiler/Aachen, D 1989
12. Pemberville, Ohio, USA 1982
13. Clifton, Illinois, USA 1977
14. Strasbourg, F 1989
15. Canton, Ohio, USA 1977
16. Steeden/Limburg, D 1991

 

Frieze London
Frieze London

Bernd & Hilla Becher
Grain Elevators, 1977-1991
1 of 16. Milwaukee, Wisconsin, USA 1978

Bernd & Hilla Becher
Grain Elevators, 1977-1991
1 of 16. Milwaukee, Wisconsin, USA 1978

Frieze London
Frieze London

Bernd & Hilla Becher
Grain Elevators, 1977-1991
2 of 16. Calumet, Illinois, USA 1978

Frieze London
Frieze London

Bernd & Hilla Becher
Grain Elevators, 1977-1991
3 of 16. Milwaukee, Wisconsin, USA 1978

Frieze London
Frieze London

Bernd & Hilla Becher
Grain Elevators, 1977-1991
4 of 16. Chebanse, Illinois, USA 1977

Frieze London
Frieze London

Bernd & Hilla Becher
Grain Elevators, 1977-1991
5 of 16. Findlay, Ohio, USA 1978

Frieze London
Frieze London

Bernd & Hilla Becher
Grain Elevators, 1977-1991
6 of 16. Toledo, Ohio, USA 1978

Frieze London
Frieze London

Bernd & Hilla Becher
Grain Elevators, 1977-1991
7 of 16. Onarga, Illinois, USA 1982

Frieze London
Frieze London

Bernd & Hilla Becher
Grain Elevators, 1977-1991
8 of 16. Van Wert, Ohio, USA 1982

Frieze London
Frieze London

Bernd & Hilla Becher
Grain Elevators, 1977-1991
9 of 16. Roberts, Illinois, USA 1982

Frieze London
Frieze London

Bernd & Hilla Becher
Grain Elevators, 1977-1991
10 of 16. Rothenburg o. T., D 1991

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Frieze London

Bernd & Hilla Becher
Grain Elevators, 1977-1991
11 of 16. Eschweiler/Aachen, D 1989

Frieze London
Frieze London

Bernd & Hilla Becher
Grain Elevators, 1977-1991
12 of 16. Pemberville, Ohio, USA 1982

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Frieze London

Bernd & Hilla Becher
Grain Elevators, 1977-1991
13 of 16. Clifton, Illinois, USA 1977

Frieze London
Frieze London

Bernd & Hilla Becher
Grain Elevators, 1977-1991
14 of 16. Strasbourg, F 1989

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Frieze London

Bernd & Hilla Becher
Grain Elevators, 1977-1991
15 of 16. Canton, Ohio, USA 1977

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Frieze London

Bernd & Hilla Becher
Grain Elevators, 1977-1991
16 of 16. Steeden/Limburg, D 1991

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In a photographic project spanning five decades, Bernd and Hilla Becher documented the soon-to-be-forgotten architectural forms of industry. Systematically photographing each structure, the artists examined their shared qualities and categorized the images into grid typologies or displayed them individually. The Grain Elevators presented here have a somewhat haphazard appearance, an amalgamation of different materials and surfaces, with their sculptural qualities enhanced by an obsessively formalist, technically precise and instantly recognizable style. The structures here are primarily from the United States, but a few are shot in France and Germany, presenting a language of heavy industry that developed independently across borders. The artists’ taxonomic eye, indebted to the German Neue Sachlichkeit movement of the 1920s and its drive toward an expressionless, non-subjective style, is enhanced by their use of a large-format camera and strict criteria that carefully governs what can and cannot be included in each frame. Their work is a testimony to the engineers and architects of heavy industry, as well as to the generations of people who used them; as a requiem for a lost world, these functional structures achieve a great beauty.

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Karl Bertsch, poster for Die Neue Sachlichkeit, Kunsthalle Mannheim, 1925

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Karl Bertsch, poster for Die Neue Sachlichkeit, Kunsthalle Mannheim, 1925

In a photographic project spanning five decades, Bernd and Hilla Becher documented the soon-to-be-forgotten architectural forms of industry. Systematically photographing each structure, the artists examined their shared qualities and categorized the images into grid typologies or displayed them individually. The Grain Elevators presented here have a somewhat haphazard appearance, an amalgamation of different materials and surfaces, with their sculptural qualities enhanced by an obsessively formalist, technically precise and instantly recognizable style. The structures here are primarily from the United States, but a few are shot in France and Germany, presenting a language of heavy industry that developed independently across borders. The artists’ taxonomic eye, indebted to the German Neue Sachlichkeit movement of the 1920s and its drive toward an expressionless, non-subjective style, is enhanced by their use of a large-format camera and strict criteria that carefully governs what can and cannot be included in each frame. Their work is a testimony to the engineers and architects of heavy industry, as well as to the generations of people who used them; as a requiem for a lost world, these functional structures achieve a great beauty.

Cao Fei
Frieze London

Cao Fei
Nova 11, 2019
Inkjet print on paper
110 × 150 cm
43 1/4 × 59 inches
Edition of 7

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Cao Fei
Nova 11, 2019
Inkjet print on paper
110 × 150 cm
43 1/4 × 59 inches
Edition of 7

Cao Fei
Nova 11, 2019
Inkjet print on paper
110 × 150 cm
43 1/4 × 59 inches
Edition of 7

Frieze London
Frieze London

Cao Fei
Nova 11, 2019 (detail)

Cao Fei
Nova 11, 2019 (detail)

Frieze London
Frieze London

Cao Fei
Nova 11, 2019 (installation view)
inkjet print on paper
110 × 150 cm
43 1/4 × 59 inches
Edition of 7

Cao Fei
Nova 11, 2019 (installation view)
inkjet print on paper
110 × 150 cm
43 1/4 × 59 inches
Edition of 7

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China’s rapid urbanization over the last few decades has been a constant source of inspiration for acclaimed Chinese artist Cao Fei. Employing film, video, and virtual reality (among other mediums), she explores the intersection between humanity and the digital age, often using the backdrop of her Beijing neighborhood as a setting. The artist’s newest feature-length film, Nova (2019), focuses on a computer scientist attempting to turn human beings into digital mediums; in this quest, the scientist experiments on his own son and accidentally transforms him into a virtual being trapped in cyberspace. Saturated in hues of purple, pink and blue, the film investigates sacrifice for progress’ sake and how narrative can be created in a world beyond time. As with all her video work, Cao Fei created an accompanying series of photographs for the film; here, Nova 11 (2019) depicts the scientist in his lab, pointing toward a future he so desperately wishes to create.

 

Trailer for Cao Fei, Nova, 2019

 

George Condo
Frieze London

George Condo
Panic in Central Park, 2020
Aquarelle crayon and wash on paper
66 × 101.6 cm
26 × 40 inches
82.2 × 117.2 × 4.4 cm (framed)
32 3/8 × 46 1/8 × 1 3/4 inches (framed)

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George Condo
Panic in Central Park, 2020
Aquarelle crayon and wash on paper
66 × 101.6 cm
26 × 40 inches
82.2 × 117.2 × 4.4 cm (framed)
32 3/8 × 46 1/8 × 1 3/4 inches (framed)

George Condo
Panic in Central Park, 2020
Aquarelle crayon and wash on paper
66 × 101.6 cm
26 × 40 inches
82.2 × 117.2 × 4.4 cm (framed)
32 3/8 × 46 1/8 × 1 3/4 inches (framed)

Frieze London
Frieze London

George Condo
Panic in Central Park, 2020 (detail)

Frieze London
Frieze London

George Condo
Panic in Central Park, 2020 (detail)

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Frieze London

George Condo
Panic in Central Park, 2020 (detail)

Frieze London

George Condo
Panic in Central Park, 2020 (installation view)
Aquarelle crayon and wash on paper
66 × 101.6 cm
26 × 40 inches
82.2 × 117.2 × 4.4 cm (framed)
32 3/8 × 46 1/8 × 1 3/4 inches (framed)

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A pioneer of the international revival of figurative painting since the early 1980s, George Condo has developed a unique and celebrated pictorial language that brings together references to Western art history—synthesized elements from Old Master painting, Cubism, Surrealism, Pop art and Abstract Expressionism—with aspects of mass media, such as comic books and music. The artist’s eclectic use of color and gesture, his keen portrayal of psychic dissonance and his blend of artistic and pop-cultural influences comes to the fore in his drawing Panic in Central Park (2020). Three main figures occupy the picture plane, but glimpses of other eyes, profiles and facial features proliferate in an interlocking array of characters that evokes a multiplicity of thoughts, moods and emotions—an approach that Condo terms “psychological cubism.” The ominous title brings to mind newspaper headlines sensationalizing urban crime and the human tendency to perceive danger in the unknown, and the work’s palette of black, electric blue, bright red, magenta and yellow-green highlight this anxious, albeit virtuosic, portrayal.

 

George Condo’s interest in portraiture dominates his oeuvre, and many of his works consist of “invented” portraits that create enthralling characters in guises reminiscent of stereotypical roles. This intimate work on paper is part of a group of works made on sheets cut from a roll of hot-pressed Aquarelle paper, done in ink and graphite. Its particular subject, “the reporter,” evokes an old-fashioned concept of the male journalist figure – clad in a suit, with balding hair, he appears to clutch a notepad or smoke a pipe (or both). In yet another example of his “psychological Cubism,” Condo endeavors to depict numerous emotional auras at once, and his unique approach to portraiture strives for the depiction of character without the need for traditional figurative representation. Moreover, the intimacy of the medium subtly yet powerfully conveys the flair of Condo’s draftsmanship, and his innate ability to combine the beautiful with the grotesque.

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George Condo
The Reporter #2, 2017
Graphite and ink on paper
159.4 × 131.4 cm
62 3/4 × 51 3/4 inches
174 × 140.7 × 5.9 cm (framed)
68 1/2 × 55 3/8 × 2 5/16 inches (framed)

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George Condo
The Reporter #2, 2017
Graphite and ink on paper
159.4 × 131.4 cm
62 3/4 × 51 3/4 inches
174 × 140.7 × 5.9 cm (framed)
68 1/2 × 55 3/8 × 2 5/16 inches (framed)

George Condo
The Reporter #2, 2017
Graphite and ink on paper
159.4 × 131.4 cm
62 3/4 × 51 3/4 inches
174 × 140.7 × 5.9 cm (framed)
68 1/2 × 55 3/8 × 2 5/16 inches (framed)

Frieze London
Frieze London

George Condo
The Reporter #2, 2017 (detail)

Frieze London
Frieze London

George Condo
The Reporter #2, 2017
Graphite and ink on paper
159.4 × 131.4 cm
62 3/4 × 51 3/4 inches
174 × 140.7 × 5.9 cm (framed)
68 1/2 × 55 3/8 × 2 5/16 inches (framed)

Frieze London

George Condo
The Reporter #2, 2017
Graphite and ink on paper
159.4 × 131.4 cm
62 3/4 × 51 3/4 inches
174 × 140.7 × 5.9 cm (framed)
68 1/2 × 55 3/8 × 2 5/16 inches (framed)

Details
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George Condo’s interest in portraiture dominates his oeuvre, and many of his works consist of “invented” portraits that create enthralling characters in guises reminiscent of stereotypical roles. This intimate work on paper is part of a group of works made on sheets cut from a roll of hot-pressed Aquarelle paper, done in ink and graphite. Its particular subject, “the reporter,” evokes an old-fashioned concept of the male journalist figure – clad in a suit, with balding hair, he appears to clutch a notepad or smoke a pipe (or both). In yet another example of his “psychological Cubism,” Condo endeavors to depict numerous emotional auras at once, and his unique approach to portraiture strives for the depiction of character without the need for traditional figurative representation. Moreover, the intimacy of the medium subtly yet powerfully conveys the flair of Condo’s draftsmanship, and his innate ability to combine the beautiful with the grotesque.

Thomas Demand
Frieze London

Thomas Demand
kinglet, 2020
Framed pigment print
110 × 145 cm
43 1/4 × 57 inches
135 × 172 cm (framed)
53 1/8 × 67 3/4 inches (framed)
Edition of 2

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Thomas Demand
kinglet, 2020
Framed pigment print
110 × 145 cm
43 1/4 × 57 inches
135 × 172 cm (framed)
53 1/8 × 67 3/4 inches (framed)
Edition of 2

Thomas Demand
kinglet, 2020
Framed pigment print
110 × 145 cm
43 1/4 × 57 inches
135 × 172 cm (framed)
53 1/8 × 67 3/4 inches (framed)
Edition of 2

Frieze London
Frieze London

Thomas Demand
kinglet, 2020 (detail)

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Frieze London

Thomas Demand
kinglet, 2020 (detail)

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Frieze London

Thomas Demand
kinglet, 2020 (detail)

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Frieze London

Thomas Demand
kinglet, 2020 (installation view)
Framed pigment print
110 × 145 cm
43 1/4 × 57 inches
135 × 172 cm (framed)
53 1/8 × 67 3/4 inches (framed)
Edition of 2

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Thomas Demand’s ongoing Model Studies series has been a departure in his own practice, portraying models produced by architects rather than his own. For Demand, the architectural model is a sculptural object used to convey a series of ideas, often fragmented or for projects never to be realized. In the latest iteration of the series, he worked in the atelier of the late fashion designer Azzedine Alaïa, documenting the patterns prepared for his garments. In kinglet (2020), the pieces of fabric and paper, hanging and categorized by color, offer potential for components or items of clothing that may or may not have ever entered full production. Depicted well over life-size but somewhat abstracted from their full form, they become a study in line, shade and color. Considered in light of his earlier Model Studies, photographed from the work of John Lautner, SANAA, Hans Hollein and Gio Ponti, Demand draws parallels between the rigidity of these primarily cardboard models, somewhat like his own, and the fluidity of those made for the body.

kinglet is included in the exhibition Thomas Demand: House of Card, on view at Museum Leuven beginning October 9, 2020.

 

Thea Djordjadze
Frieze London

Thea Djordjadze
Untitled, 2020
Wood, plaster, paint
104 × 77.5 × 3.5 cm
41 × 30 1/2 × 1 3/8 inches

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Thea Djordjadze
Untitled, 2020
Wood, plaster, paint
104 × 77.5 × 3.5 cm
41 × 30 1/2 × 1 3/8 inches

Thea Djordjadze
Untitled, 2020
Wood, plaster, paint
104 × 77.5 × 3.5 cm
41 × 30 1/2 × 1 3/8 inches

Frieze London
Frieze London

Thea Djordjadze
Untitled, 2020 (detail)

Frieze London
Frieze London

Thea Djordjadze
Untitled, 2020 (detail)

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Frieze London

Thea Djordjadze
Untitled, 2020 (detail)

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Frieze London

Thea Djordjadze
Untitled, 2020 (detail)

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Henri Matisse in his studio at the Hotel Régina, Nice-Cimiez, August 1941

Across many artistic mediums, the work of Georgian artist Thea Djordjadze concerns itself with poetry: of space, of material, of aesthetics, of memory. She combines a variety of methods and materials—often industrial and unconventional—to produce works full of contrast and complexity, despite their outward simplicity. Untitled (2020) is a plaster work whose pigment is incorporated both into the physical makeup of the work, as well as layered onto the surface. It has a palpable physicality, as Djordjadze gouges, scratches, layers and bores into the surface in order to create the composition. The artist’s plaster paintings are therefore marked with the physical and psychological presence of the artist; their gestural quality connotes sweeping movements of the arm, while their size and textural quality is somehow corporeal. Untitled (2020) finds inspiration from the monstera deliciosa or Swiss Cheese plants found in Henri Matisse’s studio.

Untitled is located in London. Please contact us if you would like to arrange a viewing.

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Henri Matisse in his studio at the Hotel Régina, Nice-Cimiez, August 1941

Across many artistic mediums, the work of Georgian artist Thea Djordjadze concerns itself with poetry: of space, of material, of aesthetics, of memory. She combines a variety of methods and materials—often industrial and unconventional—to produce works full of contrast and complexity, despite their outward simplicity. Untitled (2020) is a plaster work whose pigment is incorporated both into the physical makeup of the work, as well as layered onto the surface. It has a palpable physicality, as Djordjadze gouges, scratches, layers and bores into the surface in order to create the composition. The artist’s plaster paintings are therefore marked with the physical and psychological presence of the artist; their gestural quality connotes sweeping movements of the arm, while their size and textural quality is somehow corporeal. Untitled (2020) finds inspiration from the monstera deliciosa or Swiss Cheese plants found in Henri Matisse’s studio.

Untitled is located in London. Please contact us if you would like to arrange a viewing.

Lucy Dodd
Frieze London

Lucy Dodd
WWW. he he he, 2015
Tetley’s, graphite, hematite, terra, charcoal, and mixed pigment on canvas
179.7 × 208.3 × 203.2 × 101.6 cm
70 3/4 × 82 × 80 × 40 inches
(Clockwise from top)

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Lucy Dodd
WWW. he he he, 2015
Tetley’s, graphite, hematite, terra, charcoal, and mixed pigment on canvas
179.7 × 208.3 × 203.2 × 101.6 cm
70 3/4 × 82 × 80 × 40 inches
(Clockwise from top)

Lucy Dodd
WWW. he he he, 2015
Tetley’s, graphite, hematite, terra, charcoal, and mixed pigment on canvas
179.7 × 208.3 × 203.2 × 101.6 cm
70 3/4 × 82 × 80 × 40 inches
(Clockwise from top)

Frieze London
Frieze London

Lucy Dodd
WWW. he he he, 2015 (detail)

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Frieze London

Lucy Dodd
WWW. he he he, 2015 (detail)

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Lucy Dodd
WWW. he he he, 2015 (installation view)
Tetley's, graphite, hematite, terra, charcoal, and mixed pigment on canvas
179.7 × 208.3 × 203.2 × 101.6 cm
(Clockwise from top)
70 3/4 × 82 × 80 × 40 inches
(Clockwise from top)

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Lucy Dodd deals in the symbolic, focusing her painting practice on the possibilities of abstraction as a vessel for spiritual language. Dodd often uses unorthodox materials and unconventionally shaped canvases, creating an ecosystem of organic, oozing shapes and layered colors that belong to another world entirely. Dodd allows biological processes to occur naturally on the canvas itself, watching the organic chemical reactions between materials cause the surface to truly come to life. With WWW. he he he (2015), Tetley’s tea, graphite, hematite, terra, charcoal, and mixed pigment were applied to the canvas in order to create the work's fungal shapes and earth-tone hues. This medley was smeared, rubbed, sprayed, stained, or left intact, allowing for the ghostly veils of color that contrast with the darker cloud that descends from above into frame. The trapezoidal canvas neatly contains this free-flowing, dynamic world, allowing viewers an entry point into an alternate universe that embraces the mystical possibility of transformation.

 

Gilbert & George
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Gilbert & George
DARWIN DAY, 2019
Mixed media
226 × 253 cm
89 × 99 5/8 inches

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Gilbert & George
DARWIN DAY, 2019
Mixed media
226 × 253 cm
89 × 99 5/8 inches

Gilbert & George
DARWIN DAY, 2019
Mixed media
226 × 253 cm
89 × 99 5/8 inches

Frieze London
Frieze London

Gilbert & George
DARWIN DAY, 2019 (detail)

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Frieze London

Gilbert & George
DARWIN DAY, 2019 (detail)

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Under cover of their deceptively straightforward visual language, the famed artistic duo Gilbert & George have for over fifty years tackled critical, provocative subjects that tap into the deepest drives of contemporary society. Their works also reference disparate eras of cultural history, from nineteenth-century Romanticism to the pop milieu of science fiction and comic books. DARWIN DAY (2019) comes from their recent body of work THE PARADISICAL PICTURES, in which Gilbert & George appear amid a vivid array of psychedelically colored natural forms, including flowers, leaves, petals, fruits, tree limbs and branches. Individually, each picture presents a mesmeric world unto itself, replete with lush surfaces and vibrant hues, but likewise filled with references to aging and exhaustion. In DARWIN DAY, the artists are engulfed by giant mauve and brown petals, suggesting perhaps that plant life might be overtaking humanity in the course of evolution. Frequently the butt of their own jokes, the artists negate the myth of artistic genius and present themselves as fallible seekers of knowledge.

DARWIN DAY will be featured in a major solo exhibition of Gilbert & George’s work at Schirn Kunsthalle Frankfurt in 2021.

 

Andreas Gursky
Frieze London

Andreas Gursky
Hong Kong Shanghai Bank I, 2020
Inkjet-print, Diasec
307 × 205.7 × 6.2 cm (framed)
120 7/8 × 81 × 2 3/8 inches (framed)
Edition of 6 + 2 AP

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Andreas Gursky
Hong Kong Shanghai Bank I, 2020
Inkjet-print, Diasec
307 × 205.7 × 6.2 cm (framed)
120 7/8 × 81 × 2 3/8 inches (framed)
Edition of 6 + 2 AP

Andreas Gursky
Hong Kong Shanghai Bank I, 2020
Inkjet-print, Diasec
307 × 205.7 × 6.2 cm (framed)
120 7/8 × 81 × 2 3/8 inches (framed)
Edition of 6 + 2 AP

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Frieze London

Andreas Gursky
Hong Kong Shanghai Bank I, 2020 (detail)

Frieze London
Frieze London

Andreas Gursky
Hong Kong Shanghai Bank I, 2020 (installation view)
Inkjet-print, Diasec
307 × 205.7 × 6.2 cm (framed)
120 7/8 × 81 × 2 3/8 inches (framed)
Edition of 6 + 2 AP

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From Paris, Montparnasse (1993) to his most recent work, Andreas Gursky has long been casting his eye on architecture across the world, making it a core subject in his “Encyclopedia of Life.” The first time he photographed the Hong Kong Bank, Sir Norman Foster’s iconic high-rise, was in 1994, and in 2020 he made three more pictures of the building, still an important landmark in the Hong Kong skyline. While his first photograph of the subject, Hong Kong Shanghai Bank (1994), expressed the bullish optimism of capitalism of the 1980s, as well as the aspirations for transparency in modernist architecture, the three new photographs portray the building in a more complicated light. In Hong Kong, Shanghai Bank I (2020) a red-orange diode curtain obscures the windows. The screen has a decorative function, creating a warm, vibrant pattern, and thus adding texture to the building’s futuristic façade. At the same time, the screen creates a screen against prying eyes, invoking an age of increased privacy since the era in which Gursky first photographed the building, almost 30 years ago. 

Gursky’s photographs are the subject of an exhibition of new work at the Berlin gallery, as well as the online exhibition Space is Time.

 

Video production: Carolin Röckelein / Soundtrack and voiceover: Erin Lang

 

Jenny Holzer
Frieze London

Jenny Holzer
mission-essential warfighting, 2020
Text: US government document
Diptych; Platinum and red gold leaf and oil on linen
147.3 × 111.8 × 3.8 cm (each)
58 × 44 × 1 1/2 inches (each)

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Jenny Holzer
mission-essential warfighting, 2020
Text: US government document
Diptych; Platinum and red gold leaf and oil on linen
147.3 × 111.8 × 3.8 cm (each)
58 × 44 × 1 1/2 inches (each)

Jenny Holzer
mission-essential warfighting, 2020
Text: US government document
Diptych; Platinum and red gold leaf and oil on linen
147.3 × 111.8 × 3.8 cm (each)
58 × 44 × 1 1/2 inches (each)

Frieze London
Frieze London

Jenny Holzer
mission-essential warfighting, 2020 (detail)

Frieze London
Frieze London

Jenny Holzer
mission-essential warfighting, 2020 (detail)

Frieze London
Frieze London

Jenny Holzer
mission-essential warfighting, 2020 (detail)

Frieze London
Frieze London

Jenny Holzer
mission-essential warfighting, 2020 (detail)

Frieze London
Frieze London

Jenny Holzer
mission-essential warfighting, 2020 (installation view)
Text: US government document
Diptych; Platinum and red gold leaf and oil on linen
147.3 × 111.8 × 3.8 cm (each)
58 × 44 × 1 1/2 inches (each)

Details
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Since the early 2000s, Jenny Holzer has researched redacted US government documents released to the public under the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA), using them as source material for silkscreens, watercolors and paintings. The documents themselves concern the global War on Terror, US military operations in Afghanistan and Iraq, and, more recently, Special Counsel Robert S. Mueller’s investigation of Russian interference in the 2016 US Presidential election. Each painting is true to the original: the source document is enlarged and the content carefully reproduced to emphasize the traces of censorship and concealment within the text. A stunning and rare instance of a diptych among this body of work, mission-essential warfighting (2020) comes from an original report about military cyberspace operations. The canvases’ vibrant geometric fields of color make clear Holzer’s early affinity for the abstract paintings of Kazimir Malevich, Ad Reinhardt, Mark Rothko and Barnett Newman. Yet despite the regal expanses of blue, crimson, gold and silver, the difficult context of Holzer’s source material comes through via her emphasis on its textual redactions and strikethroughs. In so doing, she highlights how these documents share or conceal information about the tactics of power and war.

Frieze London

Page from November 2015 US Department of Defense Inspector General report titled “Combat Mission Teams and Cyber Protection Teams Lacked Adequate Capabilities and Facilities to Perform Missions”

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Frieze London

Page from November 2015 US Department of Defense Inspector General report titled “Combat Mission Teams and Cyber Protection Teams Lacked Adequate Capabilities and Facilities to Perform Missions”

Since the early 2000s, Jenny Holzer has researched redacted US government documents released to the public under the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA), using them as source material for silkscreens, watercolors and paintings. The documents themselves concern the global War on Terror, US military operations in Afghanistan and Iraq, and, more recently, Special Counsel Robert S. Mueller’s investigation of Russian interference in the 2016 US Presidential election. Each painting is true to the original: the source document is enlarged and the content carefully reproduced to emphasize the traces of censorship and concealment within the text. A stunning and rare instance of a diptych among this body of work, mission-essential warfighting (2020) comes from an original report about military cyberspace operations. The canvases’ vibrant geometric fields of color make clear Holzer’s early affinity for the abstract paintings of Kazimir Malevich, Ad Reinhardt, Mark Rothko and Barnett Newman. Yet despite the regal expanses of blue, crimson, gold and silver, the difficult context of Holzer’s source material comes through via her emphasis on its textual redactions and strikethroughs. In so doing, she highlights how these documents share or conceal information about the tactics of power and war.

Frieze London

Jenny Holzer
Selection from Truisms: It is man’s fate…, 2015
Text: Truisms (1977–79)
Labradorite Light footstool
43.2 × 63.5 × 40.6 cm
17 × 25 × 16 inches
Edition of 6

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Frieze London

Jenny Holzer
Selection from Truisms: It is man’s fate…, 2015
Text: Truisms (1977–79)
Labradorite Light footstool
43.2 × 63.5 × 40.6 cm
17 × 25 × 16 inches
Edition of 6

Jenny Holzer
Selection from Truisms: It is man’s fate…, 2015
Text: Truisms (1977–79)
Labradorite Light footstool
43.2 × 63.5 × 40.6 cm
17 × 25 × 16 inches
Edition of 6

Frieze London
Frieze London

Jenny Holzer
Selection from Truisms: It is man’s fate…, 2015 (detail)

Frieze London
Frieze London

Jenny Holzer
Selection from Truisms: It is man’s fate…, 2015 (detail)

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Frieze London

Jenny Holzer
Selection from Truisms: It is man’s fate…, 2015 (detail)

Jenny Holzer’s primary medium is text, and since the late 1970s she has presented her penetrating phrases in various forms, including on benches and footstools whose stone surfaces exude at once physical and symbolic weight. This work is made of green Labradorite whose stunning surface is at turns translucent and iridescent, with flecks of blue, teal and gold. The text—IT IS MAN’S FATE TO OUTSMART HIMSELF—comes from Holzer’s Truisms, whose pithy statements distill difficult and contentious ideas into a seemingly straightforward fact, making the reader pause for thought and call into question the power of language itself. The sentiment here touches upon the innate human desire to achieve and exceed, as well as the possibly negative ramifications and consequences of this drive. Considering Holzer’s long-standing presence at the forefront of feminist art and thought, the gendered nature of “man” and “himself” in the sentence may also suggest a critique of a society still disproportionately governed and dictated by men. But as in all of her texts and works, Holzer avoids any overt or easy interpretations, letting the object’s presence and context speak for itself.

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Frieze London

Jenny Holzer
Selection from Truisms: It is man’s fate…, 2015 (detail)

Jenny Holzer’s primary medium is text, and since the late 1970s she has presented her penetrating phrases in various forms, including on benches and footstools whose stone surfaces exude at once physical and symbolic weight. This work is made of green Labradorite whose stunning surface is at turns translucent and iridescent, with flecks of blue, teal and gold. The text—IT IS MAN’S FATE TO OUTSMART HIMSELF—comes from Holzer’s Truisms, whose pithy statements distill difficult and contentious ideas into a seemingly straightforward fact, making the reader pause for thought and call into question the power of language itself. The sentiment here touches upon the innate human desire to achieve and exceed, as well as the possibly negative ramifications and consequences of this drive. Considering Holzer’s long-standing presence at the forefront of feminist art and thought, the gendered nature of “man” and “himself” in the sentence may also suggest a critique of a society still disproportionately governed and dictated by men. But as in all of her texts and works, Holzer avoids any overt or easy interpretations, letting the object’s presence and context speak for itself.

Gary Hume
Frieze London

Gary Hume
Two Blooms, Grey Fields, 2020
Gloss paint on aluminium
151 × 214 cm
59 1/2 × 84 1/4 inches

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Gary Hume
Two Blooms, Grey Fields, 2020
Gloss paint on aluminium
151 × 214 cm
59 1/2 × 84 1/4 inches

Gary Hume
Two Blooms, Grey Fields, 2020
Gloss paint on aluminium
151 × 214 cm
59 1/2 × 84 1/4 inches

Frieze London
Frieze London

Gary Hume
Two Blooms, Grey Fields, 2020 (detail)

Frieze London
Frieze London

Gary Hume
Two Blooms, Grey Fields, 2020 (detail)

Frieze London

Gary Hume
Two Blooms, Grey Fields, 2020 (installation view)
Gloss paint on aluminium
151 × 214 cm
59 1/2 × 84 1/4 inches

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Known for his distinctive gloss-on-aluminum paintings, Gary Hume has over the past three decades become recognized as a restless innovator and a supreme colorist. While his geometrical “Door” paintings established the artist as an important voice among an ambitious generation of British artists, he has since become renowned for a richly varied repertoire of traditional painter’s subjects such as the human figure, birds and flowers. Two Blooms, Grey Fields (2020) is one of a group of symmetrical flower paintings Hume made in 2020: all three featured in the gallery’s online exhibition, Double Bloom. The artist has compared his flowers to people, and indeed Two Blooms, Grey Fields readily brings to mind a couple deep in conversation. The sense of intimacy between the two flowers is also a reminder that one of Hume’s favorite artists is the Mannerist Bronzino. The Madonna and Child with Saint John the Baptist and Saint Elizabeth, in London’s National Gallery, depicts Mary and the Christ child suspended forever in a moment just before their faces touch. As with Bronzino’s mother and child, the flowers in Two Blooms, Grey Fields are suspended forever, loving yet hesitant, on the verge of an intimate connection.

Two Blooms, Grey Fields is located in London. Please contact us if you would like to arrange a viewing.

Frieze London

Bronzino, The Madonna and Child with Saint John the Baptist and Saint Elizabeth, c. 1940, National Gallery, London

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Frieze London

Bronzino, The Madonna and Child with Saint John the Baptist and Saint Elizabeth, c. 1940, National Gallery, London

Known for his distinctive gloss-on-aluminum paintings, Gary Hume has over the past three decades become recognized as a restless innovator and a supreme colorist. While his geometrical “Door” paintings established the artist as an important voice among an ambitious generation of British artists, he has since become renowned for a richly varied repertoire of traditional painter’s subjects such as the human figure, birds and flowers. Two Blooms, Grey Fields (2020) is one of a group of symmetrical flower paintings Hume made in 2020: all three featured in the gallery’s online exhibition, Double Bloom. The artist has compared his flowers to people, and indeed Two Blooms, Grey Fields readily brings to mind a couple deep in conversation. The sense of intimacy between the two flowers is also a reminder that one of Hume’s favorite artists is the Mannerist Bronzino. The Madonna and Child with Saint John the Baptist and Saint Elizabeth, in London’s National Gallery, depicts Mary and the Christ child suspended forever in a moment just before their faces touch. As with Bronzino’s mother and child, the flowers in Two Blooms, Grey Fields are suspended forever, loving yet hesitant, on the verge of an intimate connection.

Two Blooms, Grey Fields is located in London. Please contact us if you would like to arrange a viewing.

Karen Kilimnik
Frieze London

Karen Kilimnik
Secret agent club, London, Mayfair, 2017
Water soluble oil color on canvas
30.5 × 23.5 cm
12 × 9 1/4 inches

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Karen Kilimnik
Secret agent club, London, Mayfair, 2017
Water soluble oil color on canvas
30.5 × 23.5 cm
12 × 9 1/4 inches

Karen Kilimnik
Secret agent club, London, Mayfair, 2017
Water soluble oil color on canvas
30.5 × 23.5 cm
12 × 9 1/4 inches

Frieze London
Frieze London

Karen Kilimnik
Secret agent club, London, Mayfair, 2017 (detail)

Frieze London
Frieze London

Karen Kilimnik
Secret agent club, London, Mayfair, 2017 (detail)

Frieze London
Frieze London

Karen Kilimnik
Secret agent club, London, Mayfair, 2017 (installation view)
Water soluble oil color on canvas
30.5 × 23.5 cm
12 × 9 1/4 inches

Frieze London
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Excerpt from the introduction to The Avengers, Season 5, 1966 (ABC Television)

In a diverse practice that draws upon the tradition of Romantic painting, Karen Kilimnik utilizes painting, drawing, collage, photography, video and installation to produce nuanced and playful observations of historical codes and symbols. Reveling in both mass and high culture, she depicts places and people both semi-fictional and real, creating her own specific mélange of cultural influence and production. The painting presented here, Secret agent club, London, Mayfair (2017), displays her fascination with British culture and the narratives she creates. The glossed black door of the “secret agent club” could be the frontage of any number of Georgian buildings in the capital, but here ascribed a mythical sense of intrigue, perhaps even snatched from the artist’s beloved 1960s British spy series The Avengers. Kilmnik imagines it as a place where bowler-hatted agents could relax or meet for assignments in a scene that is elegantly and quintessentially London.

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Excerpt from the introduction to The Avengers, Season 5, 1966 (ABC Television)

In a diverse practice that draws upon the tradition of Romantic painting, Karen Kilimnik utilizes painting, drawing, collage, photography, video and installation to produce nuanced and playful observations of historical codes and symbols. Reveling in both mass and high culture, she depicts places and people both semi-fictional and real, creating her own specific mélange of cultural influence and production. The painting presented here, Secret agent club, London, Mayfair (2017), displays her fascination with British culture and the narratives she creates. The glossed black door of the “secret agent club” could be the frontage of any number of Georgian buildings in the capital, but here ascribed a mythical sense of intrigue, perhaps even snatched from the artist’s beloved 1960s British spy series The Avengers. Kilmnik imagines it as a place where bowler-hatted agents could relax or meet for assignments in a scene that is elegantly and quintessentially London.

Astrid Klein
Frieze London

Astrid Klein
Untitled, 2010
Acrylic on canvas, tape
180 × 130 cm
70 7/8 × 51 1/8 inches

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Astrid Klein
Untitled, 2010
Acrylic on canvas, tape
180 × 130 cm
70 7/8 × 51 1/8 inches

Astrid Klein
Untitled, 2010
Acrylic on canvas, tape
180 × 130 cm
70 7/8 × 51 1/8 inches

Frieze London
Frieze London

Astrid Klein
Untitled, 2010 (detail)

Frieze London
Frieze London

Astrid Klein
Untitled, 2010 (detail)

Frieze London
Frieze London

Astrid Klein
Untitled, 2010 (detail)

Frieze London

Astrid Klein
Untitled, 2010 (installation view)
Acrylic on canvas, tape
180 × 130 cm
70 7/8 × 51 1/8 inches

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Since the late 1970s, Astrid Klein’s paintings, collages, photo works and installations have questioned, deconstructed and reinforced the relationship between image and text. A lifelong preoccupation with literary, scientific and philosophical writings manifests itself in a body of work in which text oftentimes plays as important a role as visual content, sometimes becoming the visual content itself. Untitled (2010) is a continuation of Klein’s investigation into text as a tool for visual repetition—taking its place within her body of Schriftbilder, or “text pictures.” Painted on silver tape that is then collaged onto a silver canvas, the phrase “language reduced to dust” is dissected into its individual word fragments, floating in and out of focus on the monochrome surface. Removed from any larger context, and oriented vertically so that one needs to work to read the words, the text begins to lose its meaning and becomes more purely visual. The phrase therefore literally describes the action being done unto it through isolation and repetition: Klein reduces meaning to dust, and by doing so, explores the power of language, perception and our own subconscious.

Astrid Klein’s solo exhibition at Pinakothek der Moderne, which presents a comprehensive group of works from their collection, is on view through January 17, 2021.

 

Jean-Luc Mylayne
Frieze London

Jean-Luc Mylayne
N°269, Février Mars 2004, 2004
C-print
190 × 153 cm (framed)
74 7/8 × 60 1/4 inches (framed)

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Frieze London

Jean-Luc Mylayne
N°269, Février Mars 2004, 2004
C-print
190 × 153 cm (framed)
74 7/8 × 60 1/4 inches (framed)

Jean-Luc Mylayne
N°269, Février Mars 2004, 2004
C-print
190 × 153 cm (framed)
74 7/8 × 60 1/4 inches (framed)

Frieze London
Frieze London

Jean-Luc Mylayne
N°269, Février Mars 2004, 2004 (detail)

Frieze London
Frieze London

Jean-Luc Mylayne
N°269, Février Mars 2004, 2004 (detail)

Frieze London
Frieze London

Jean-Luc Mylayne
N°269, Février Mars 2004, 2004 (installation view)
C-print
190 × 153 cm (framed)
74 7/8 × 60 1/4 inches (framed)

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Jean-Luc Mylayne’s meticulously choreographed mises-en-scène of birds in their natural habitats are part of an ongoing pictorial archive. As a writer, poet and philosopher, Mylayne uses birds as a metaphor to address broader themes, considering the relationship between humans and animals and how time is perceived. Utilizing special lenses, lighting and a large format camera, he imagines and creates certain scenarios and lies in wait for the birds to visit—typically small, unremarkable songbirds. N°269, Février Mars 2004 (2004) takes place in New Mexico, notable for its arid plains and resounding blue sky, where the artist and his wife and collaborator, Mylène, lived for several years. The composition is carefully controlled with focus and depth of field calibrated across the image, lending it a certain painterly quality. The resulting image does not conform to the perspectives of ornithological studies or classic nature photography, which center on the distinctive features of the birds or the unusual flora, but instead produce a dynamic, filmic quality. Like the moment at which he presses the shutter, the photograph is a unique perception of time: A staged instant that Mylayne imagined long before his avian protagonist came into view.

Jean-Luc Mylayne’s works are currently on view in the exhibitions Jean-Luc Mylayne: The Autumn of Paradise at Huis Marseille, Van Gogh Inspires Jean-Luc Mylayne at Van Gogh Museum and Among the Trees at Hayward Gallery.

N°269, Février Mars 2004 is located in London. Please contact us if you would like to arrange a viewing.

 

Jean-Luc Mylayne: The Autumn of Paradise
Aargauer Kunsthaus, Aarau, May 18—August 11, 2019
©Aargauer Kunsthaus
Video: Heta Multanen

 

Senga Nengudi
Frieze London

Senga Nengudi
In My Backyard, April 2020 (Performance Photograph), 2020
Digital Inkjet Print
40 × 30 cm
15 3/4 × 11 7/8 inches
Edition of 5 + 1 AP

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Frieze London

Senga Nengudi
In My Backyard, April 2020 (Performance Photograph), 2020
Digital Inkjet Print
40 × 30 cm
15 3/4 × 11 7/8 inches
Edition of 5 + 1 AP

Senga Nengudi
In My Backyard, April 2020 (Performance Photograph), 2020
Digital Inkjet Print
40 × 30 cm
15 3/4 × 11 7/8 inches
Edition of 5 + 1 AP

Frieze London
Frieze London

Senga Nengudi
In My Backyard, April 2020 (Performance Photograph), 2020 (detail)

Frieze London
Frieze London

Senga Nengudi
In My Backyard, April 2020 (Performance Photograph), 2020 (detail)

Frieze London
Frieze London

Senga Nengudi
In My Backyard, April 2020 (Performance Photograph), 2020 (installation view)
Digital Inkjet Print
40 × 30 cm
15 3/4 × 11 7/8 inches
Edition of 5 + 1 AP

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Frieze London

Senga Nengudi
Rapunzel, 1981
Silver gelatin print
101.6 × 76.2 cm
40 × 30 inches
104.1 × 78.7 cm (framed)
41 × 31 inches (framed)
Edition of 5 + 1 AP

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Since the 1960s, Senga Nengudi has worked at the forefront of sculpture, performance and photography, using simple materials in unexpected ways in order to evoke the (Black) body, feminist considerations of space and movement, and cultural and religious ritual. She often uses a single idea or moment as a springboard to generate multiple variations of the same work in different mediums, working collaboratively in each; an early example is Rapunzel (1981), a photograph that stems from an outdoor performance work. For In My Backyard, April 2020 (Performance Photograph) (2020), Nengudi staged a performance in her backyard using her own body, everyday fabric, scavenged natural materials and existing land as a basis for this mysterious and solitary ritual. Nengudi continues her legacy of employing photography to capture the action of performance, a practice that has become especially valuable in this time of required isolation. The ephemeral nature of performance requires an audience, and through photography—in this case undertaken by her son—Nengudi allows for her performance to live on.

An exhibition of large-scale installations by the artist is currently on view at the Los Angeles gallery, and a major traveling exhibition opens at Denver Art Museum in December 2020.

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Frieze London

Senga Nengudi
Rapunzel, 1981
Silver gelatin print
101.6 × 76.2 cm
40 × 30 inches
104.1 × 78.7 cm (framed)
41 × 31 inches (framed)
Edition of 5 + 1 AP

Senga Nengudi
Rapunzel, 1981
Silver gelatin print
101.6 × 76.2 cm
40 × 30 inches
104.1 × 78.7 cm (framed)
41 × 31 inches (framed)
Edition of 5 + 1 AP

Frieze London
Frieze London

Senga Nengudi
Rapunzel, 1981 (detail)

Frieze London
Frieze London

Senga Nengudi
Rapunzel, 1981 (detail)

Frieze London
Frieze London

Senga Nengudi
Rapunzel, 1981 (installation view)
Silver gelatin print
101.6 × 76.2 cm
40 × 30 inches
104.1 × 78.7 cm (framed)
41 × 31 inches (framed)
Edition of 5 + 1 AP

Details
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Since the 1960s, Senga Nengudi has worked at the forefront of sculpture, performance and photography, using simple materials in unexpected ways in order to evoke the (Black) body, feminist considerations of space and movement, and cultural and religious ritual. She often uses a single idea or moment as a springboard to generate multiple variations of the same work in different mediums, working collaboratively in each; an early example is Rapunzel (1981), a photograph that stems from an outdoor performance work. For In My Backyard, April 2020 (Performance Photograph) (2020), Nengudi staged a performance in her backyard using her own body, everyday fabric, scavenged natural materials and existing land as a basis for this mysterious and solitary ritual. Nengudi continues her legacy of employing photography to capture the action of performance, a practice that has become especially valuable in this time of required isolation. The ephemeral nature of performance requires an audience, and through photography—in this case undertaken by her son—Nengudi allows for her performance to live on.

An exhibition of large-scale installations by the artist is currently on view at the Los Angeles gallery, and a major traveling exhibition opens at Denver Art Museum in December 2020.

David Ostrowski
Frieze London

David Ostrowski
F (Wenn ich mich langweilen will, fahre ich in einen Stau), 2016
Paper and lacquer on linen, wood
241 × 191 cm (framed)
94 7/8 × 75 1/8 inches (framed)

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David Ostrowski
F (Wenn ich mich langweilen will, fahre ich in einen Stau), 2016
Paper and lacquer on linen, wood
241 × 191 cm (framed)
94 7/8 × 75 1/8 inches (framed)

David Ostrowski
F (Wenn ich mich langweilen will, fahre ich in einen Stau), 2016
Paper and lacquer on linen, wood
241 × 191 cm (framed)
94 7/8 × 75 1/8 inches (framed)

Frieze London
Frieze London

David Ostrowski
F (Wenn ich mich langweilen will, fahre ich in einen Stau), 2016 (detail)

Frieze London
Frieze London

David Ostrowski
F (Wenn ich mich langweilen will, fahre ich in einen Stau), 2016 (installation view)
Paper and lacquer on linen, wood
241 × 191 cm (framed)
94 7/8 × 75 1/8 inches (framed)

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The Cologne-based painter David Ostrowski has produced a prolific body of work that revolves around the idea of the zero point—a place of nothingness beyond cultural and painterly codes. His minimalist canvases, which often contain just a trace of spray paint or a lacquered-on collage element, contend with emptiness and the void and in so doing grapple with and comment upon the history of painting. F (Wenn ich mich langweilen will, fahre ich in einen Stau) (“When I get bored, I drive in a traffic jam”), created in 2016, holds a special place within Ostrowski’s ongoing F series, which has prefixed the title of nearly every work he has produced since 2009. Atop a raw canvas, whose supporting stretcher bars show through its linen surface, a large piece of torn paper features a blurred figure with his arm outstretched, spray painting a black line. No actual paint appears in this work, and yet the act of spraying and artistic mark-making is foregrounded through this striking depiction. The painting thus contains all of Ostrowski’s core mediums—painting (via the canvas), drawing (via the paper), and spray (via the figure)—which literally cross over and atop each other in the final work.

 

Michail Pirgelis
Frieze London

Michail Pirgelis
Triple Paranoia, 2018
Aluminium, titanium, lacquer
84 × 64 × 19 cm
33 × 25 1/8 × 7 1/2 inches

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Michail Pirgelis
Triple Paranoia, 2018
Aluminium, titanium, lacquer
84 × 64 × 19 cm
33 × 25 1/8 × 7 1/2 inches

Michail Pirgelis
Triple Paranoia, 2018
Aluminium, titanium, lacquer
84 × 64 × 19 cm
33 × 25 1/8 × 7 1/2 inches

Frieze London
Frieze London

Michail Pirgelis
Triple Paranoia, 2018 (detail)

Frieze London
Frieze London

Michail Pirgelis
Triple Paranoia, 2018 (detail)

Frieze London
Frieze London

Michail Pirgelis
Triple Paranoia, 2018 (detail)

Frieze London
Frieze London

Michail Pirgelis
Triple Paranoia, 2018 (detail)

Frieze London
Frieze London

Michail Pirgelis
Triple Paranoia, 2018 (installation view)
Aluminium, titanium, lacquer
84 × 64 × 19 cm
33 × 25 1/8 × 7 1/2 inches

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Frieze London

Michail Pirgelis
Triple Paranoia, 2018 (detail)

Working primarily with material scavenged from airplane “cemeteries” in California and Arizona, Michail Pirgelis alters and rearranges aerospace parts to form a contemporary archaeology that transforms them into cultural objects. By decontextualizing the components, but keeping the aura of the objects intact, he explores the fragility and awe of flying as well as the human desire to defy gravity, meanwhile also making reference to a time when aviation was associated with luxury and exclusivity. Triple Paranoia (2018) is comprised of three glass-less window frames, layered and polished to a mirrored surface, exposing their rivet lines. The work is the only instance within the artist’s oeuvre to use three windows atop each other, and this repeating structure makes clear reference to minimalist sculpture, as do the work’s reflective surfaces and industrial aesthetic. The title and form of the work could not be more apt in a time when planes have been grounded and the process of flying has become seemingly more fear-inducing.

Triple Paranoia is located in Berlin. Please contact us if you would like to arrange a viewing.

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Frieze London

Michail Pirgelis
Triple Paranoia, 2018 (detail)

Working primarily with material scavenged from airplane “cemeteries” in California and Arizona, Michail Pirgelis alters and rearranges aerospace parts to form a contemporary archaeology that transforms them into cultural objects. By decontextualizing the components, but keeping the aura of the objects intact, he explores the fragility and awe of flying as well as the human desire to defy gravity, meanwhile also making reference to a time when aviation was associated with luxury and exclusivity. Triple Paranoia (2018) is comprised of three glass-less window frames, layered and polished to a mirrored surface, exposing their rivet lines. The work is the only instance within the artist’s oeuvre to use three windows atop each other, and this repeating structure makes clear reference to minimalist sculpture, as do the work’s reflective surfaces and industrial aesthetic. The title and form of the work could not be more apt in a time when planes have been grounded and the process of flying has become seemingly more fear-inducing.

Triple Paranoia is located in Berlin. Please contact us if you would like to arrange a viewing.

Pamela Rosenkranz
Frieze London

Pamela Rosenkranz
Sexual Power (Viagra Painting, Balmy Thickness), 2018
Acrylic on Aluminium
199 × 139 cm
78 3/8 × 54 3/4 inches

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Frieze London

Pamela Rosenkranz
Sexual Power (Viagra Painting, Balmy Thickness), 2018
Acrylic on Aluminium
199 × 139 cm
78 3/8 × 54 3/4 inches

Pamela Rosenkranz
Sexual Power (Viagra Painting, Balmy Thickness), 2018
Acrylic on Aluminium
199 × 139 cm
78 3/8 × 54 3/4 inches

Frieze London
Frieze London

Pamela Rosenkranz
Sexual Power (Viagra Painting, Balmy Thickness), 2018 (detail)

Frieze London
Frieze London

Pamela Rosenkranz
Sexual Power (Viagra Painting, Balmy Thickness), 2018 (detail)

Frieze London

Pamela Rosenkranz
Sexual Power (Viagra Painting, Balmy Thickness), 2018 (installation view)
Acrylic on Aluminium
199 × 139 cm
78 3/8 × 54 3/4 inches

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With Sexual Power (Viagra Painting, Balmy Thickness) (2018), Pamela Rosenkranz displays her continual willingness to present her physical self as a vessel for artistic production. Each painting in the artist’s longtime Sexual Power (Viagra Painting) series begins in the same way. Rosenkranz ingests Viagra, the sexual stimulant designed for male pleasure, and working on aluminum panels, she applies fluid acrylic polymer with her hands, always using flesh-toned colors. The proportions of the painting are just larger than those of a human, implicating the presence and pressure of Rosenkranz’s full body in the production of the work. The rosy pink tones of Balmy Thickness evoke an oncoming blush or other rush of blood to the skin—similar to the skin-reddening effects of enhanced blood flow, the trademark of Viagra. With this work, the artist transgresses gender boundaries in both the artistic and medical fields: By consuming a drug designed for men, and working in a manner similar to that of the hyper-masculine Abstract Expressionist movement, Rosenkranz claims male territory, power and virility as her own.

Frieze London

Pamela Rosenkranz
Installation view, Pamela Rosenkranz: Our Product, Swiss Pavillion, Venice Biennale, 2015

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Frieze London

Pamela Rosenkranz
Installation view, Pamela Rosenkranz: Our Product, Swiss Pavillion, Venice Biennale, 2015

With Sexual Power (Viagra Painting, Balmy Thickness) (2018), Pamela Rosenkranz displays her continual willingness to present her physical self as a vessel for artistic production. Each painting in the artist’s longtime Sexual Power (Viagra Painting) series begins in the same way. Rosenkranz ingests Viagra, the sexual stimulant designed for male pleasure, and working on aluminum panels, she applies fluid acrylic polymer with her hands, always using flesh-toned colors. The proportions of the painting are just larger than those of a human, implicating the presence and pressure of Rosenkranz’s full body in the production of the work. The rosy pink tones of Balmy Thickness evoke an oncoming blush or other rush of blood to the skin—similar to the skin-reddening effects of enhanced blood flow, the trademark of Viagra. With this work, the artist transgresses gender boundaries in both the artistic and medical fields: By consuming a drug designed for men, and working in a manner similar to that of the hyper-masculine Abstract Expressionist movement, Rosenkranz claims male territory, power and virility as her own.

Thomas Ruff
Frieze London

Thomas Ruff
tableau chinois 03, 2019
C-print
240 × 185 cm (framed)
94 1/2 × 72 7/8 inches (framed)
Edition of 4 + 1 AP

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Frieze London

Thomas Ruff
tableau chinois 03, 2019
C-print
240 × 185 cm (framed)
94 1/2 × 72 7/8 inches (framed)
Edition of 4 + 1 AP

Thomas Ruff
tableau chinois 03, 2019
C-print
240 × 185 cm (framed)
94 1/2 × 72 7/8 inches (framed)
Edition of 4 + 1 AP

Frieze London
Frieze London

Thomas Ruff
tableau chinois 03, 2019 (detail)

Frieze London
Frieze London

Thomas Ruff
tableau chinois 03, 2019 (detail)

Frieze London
Frieze London

Thomas Ruff
tableau chinois 03, 2019 (detail)

Frieze London
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Frieze London

Thomas Ruff
Installation view, K20 Kunstsammlung Nordrhein-Westfalen, Düsseldorf, September 12, 2020–February 7, 2021
© Foto: Achim Kulkulies, Düsseldorf

For over four decades, German photographer Thomas Ruff has explored how historical and media-driven changes in photography affect our understanding of the relationship between image and reality, often using found imagery as his starting point. His latest body of work considers propaganda images—a subject he has drawn from for many years and which has a firm place in the history of photography—and specifically material from China between 1950 and 1970. Ruff scanned the analog images from books on Mao published in China and from the magazine La Chine (distributed worldwide by the Chinese Communist Party) at an ultra-high resolution that captures the dot matrix of the objects’ original printing processes. In a complex method that involves duplicating these images digitally, translating their dot matrix into a pixel matrix, and then manipulating these layers in multiple ways, scenes of military pomp, artistic displays, jovial comrades in uniform and of course Mao himself acquire an otherworldly feel, as if existing in a parallel world that nonetheless has enormous bearing on today’s political structures and machinations.

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Frieze London

Thomas Ruff
Installation view, K20 Kunstsammlung Nordrhein-Westfalen, Düsseldorf, September 12, 2020–February 7, 2021
© Foto: Achim Kulkulies, Düsseldorf

For over four decades, German photographer Thomas Ruff has explored how historical and media-driven changes in photography affect our understanding of the relationship between image and reality, often using found imagery as his starting point. His latest body of work considers propaganda images—a subject he has drawn from for many years and which has a firm place in the history of photography—and specifically material from China between 1950 and 1970. Ruff scanned the analog images from books on Mao published in China and from the magazine La Chine (distributed worldwide by the Chinese Communist Party) at an ultra-high resolution that captures the dot matrix of the objects’ original printing processes. In a complex method that involves duplicating these images digitally, translating their dot matrix into a pixel matrix, and then manipulating these layers in multiple ways, scenes of military pomp, artistic displays, jovial comrades in uniform and of course Mao himself acquire an otherworldly feel, as if existing in a parallel world that nonetheless has enormous bearing on today’s political structures and machinations.

Analia Saban
Frieze London

Analia Saban
Motherboard #1, 2020
Ink on circuit board in artist's frame
55.2 × 34 × 4.1 cm
21 3/4 × 13 3/8 × 1 5/8 inches

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Analia Saban
Motherboard #1, 2020
Ink on circuit board in artist's frame
55.2 × 34 × 4.1 cm
21 3/4 × 13 3/8 × 1 5/8 inches

Analia Saban
Motherboard #1, 2020
Ink on circuit board in artist's frame
55.2 × 34 × 4.1 cm
21 3/4 × 13 3/8 × 1 5/8 inches

Frieze London
Frieze London

Analia Saban
Motherboard #1, 2020 (detail)

Frieze London
Frieze London

Analia Saban
Motherboard #1, 2020 (detail)

Frieze London
Frieze London

Analia Saban
Motherboard #1, 2020 (detail)

Frieze London

Analia Saban
Motherboard #1, 2020 (installation view)
Ink on circuit board in artist's frame
55.2 × 34 × 4.1 cm
21 3/4 × 13 3/8 × 1 5/8 inches

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Analia Saban works across a broad spectrum of mediums exploring how art objects are conceived, constructed and understood. She approaches her materials with both a conceptual eye and an interest in history—of art-making in general, as well as the history and social function of the materials she employs. Motherboard #1 (2020) consists of a computer motherboard—a crucial part of computer hardware through which all system components interact and connect—overlaid with black printer's ink. The latter material is usually meant to be applied thinly, like with newspaper print; yet when so thickly applied, it dries to form networks of swirling, crinkling patterns reminiscent of brain coral or Richard Artschwager's Cellotex surfaces. Saban has often combined aspects of the analog and digital worlds in her works. Encased by its inky veil and surrounded by a bespoke walnut frame, the motherboard in this case is rendered inert, a byproduct of mass digital culture that usually goes unseen but now appears as a mysterious, portentous object.

Frieze London

IBM PC Motherboard, 1981

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Frieze London

IBM PC Motherboard, 1981

Analia Saban works across a broad spectrum of mediums exploring how art objects are conceived, constructed and understood. She approaches her materials with both a conceptual eye and an interest in history—of art-making in general, as well as the history and social function of the materials she employs. Motherboard #1 (2020) consists of a computer motherboard—a crucial part of computer hardware through which all system components interact and connect—overlaid with black printer's ink. The latter material is usually meant to be applied thinly, like with newspaper print; yet when so thickly applied, it dries to form networks of swirling, crinkling patterns reminiscent of brain coral or Richard Artschwager's Cellotex surfaces. Saban has often combined aspects of the analog and digital worlds in her works. Encased by its inky veil and surrounded by a bespoke walnut frame, the motherboard in this case is rendered inert, a byproduct of mass digital culture that usually goes unseen but now appears as a mysterious, portentous object.

Thomas Scheibitz
Frieze London

Thomas Scheibitz
Still life, 2019
Oil, vinyl, pigment marker and spackling paste on canvas
230 × 180 cm
90 1/2 × 70 7/8 inches

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Thomas Scheibitz
Still life, 2019
Oil, vinyl, pigment marker and spackling paste on canvas
230 × 180 cm
90 1/2 × 70 7/8 inches

Thomas Scheibitz
Still life, 2019
Oil, vinyl, pigment marker and spackling paste on canvas
230 × 180 cm
90 1/2 × 70 7/8 inches

Frieze London
Frieze London

Thomas Scheibitz
Still life, 2020 (detail)

Frieze London
Frieze London

Thomas Scheibitz
Still life, 2020 (detail)

Frieze London

Thomas Scheibitz
Still life, 2019 (installation view)
Oil, vinyl, pigment marker and spackling paste on canvas
230 × 180 cm
90 1/2 × 70 7/8 inches

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Thomas Scheibitz explores the artistic possibilities of abstraction and figuration, working across media to create his own pictorial language that dissolves the conflicting chasm between the two. Scheibitz takes visual patterns and objects from our daily life and transforms them into an iconography all his own, often employing visual ambiguity, varied mark-making, and stark color contrasts to break our associations with what we think we are seeing. In Still life (2019), large grey brushstrokes streak vertically down the canvas, sporadically coming into contact with bold shapes in varying shades of yellow, black and brown. A glimpse of blue sky hovers above, losing grip on its place in the composition. Barely familiar forms float on the canvas—a house, an envelope, stairs or window frames, a weathervane—and come to rest together to create a scene that exudes a jumbled, fading domesticity. These forms, colors and textures migrate between the familiar and the truly abstract, pushing viewers to refer back to their own experience and perception of the world.

 

Andreas Schulze
Frieze London

Andreas Schulze
Untitled (Sicilian Hoarding 3), 2014
Acrylic on nettle cloth
80 × 150 cm
31 1/2 × 59 inches

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Andreas Schulze
Untitled (Sicilian Hoarding 3), 2014
Acrylic on nettle cloth
80 × 150 cm
31 1/2 × 59 inches

Andreas Schulze
Untitled (Sicilian Hoarding 3), 2014
Acrylic on nettle cloth
80 × 150 cm
31 1/2 × 59 inches

Frieze London
Frieze London

Andreas Schulze
Untitled (Sicilian Hoarding 3), 2014 (detail)

Frieze London
Frieze London

Andreas Schulze
Untitled (Sicilian Hoarding 3), 2014 (detail)

Frieze London
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Frieze London

Andreas Schulze
Installation view, Flowers & Landscapes, Sprüth Magers, London, June 3–August 28, 2009

For the last four decades, Andreas Schulze has played a key role in contemporary painting. His colorful pictorial worlds, which question our collective social and cultural habits, are the result of attentive observations of everyday surroundings, from domestic spaces to urban scenes to lush, natural vistas. Schulze frequently combines abstract and figurative forms, drawing freely from Surrealism, Dadaism and Abstract Expressionism to produce otherworldly scenes in a style all his own. This strategy is at play in Untitled (Sicilian Hoarding 3) (2014), which presents an array of earth-toned bands of color, reminiscent of a barcode or a barrier, that are pierced by two round zones displaying a seaside landscape. Could we be peering through a rocky façade to the sea behind it? Or are these zones floating surreally across our field of vision? The painting sets up a compelling dynamic between inside and outside that recurs throughout Schulze’s work: He paints an attractive scene that beckons the viewer, only to keep it closed off through compositional and painterly tactics, thereby leaving the viewer always wanting to see and know more.

Untitled (Sicilian Hoarding 3) is located in London. Please contact us if you would like to arrange a viewing.

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Frieze London

Andreas Schulze
Installation view, Flowers & Landscapes, Sprüth Magers, London, June 3–August 28, 2009

For the last four decades, Andreas Schulze has played a key role in contemporary painting. His colorful pictorial worlds, which question our collective social and cultural habits, are the result of attentive observations of everyday surroundings, from domestic spaces to urban scenes to lush, natural vistas. Schulze frequently combines abstract and figurative forms, drawing freely from Surrealism, Dadaism and Abstract Expressionism to produce otherworldly scenes in a style all his own. This strategy is at play in Untitled (Sicilian Hoarding 3) (2014), which presents an array of earth-toned bands of color, reminiscent of a barcode or a barrier, that are pierced by two round zones displaying a seaside landscape. Could we be peering through a rocky façade to the sea behind it? Or are these zones floating surreally across our field of vision? The painting sets up a compelling dynamic between inside and outside that recurs throughout Schulze’s work: He paints an attractive scene that beckons the viewer, only to keep it closed off through compositional and painterly tactics, thereby leaving the viewer always wanting to see and know more.

Untitled (Sicilian Hoarding 3) is located in London. Please contact us if you would like to arrange a viewing.

Cindy Sherman
Frieze London

Cindy Sherman
Untitled, 2020
Polyester, wool, acrylic, silk and cotton mercurisé woven together
284 × 190 cm
111 13/16 × 74 13/16 inches
Edition of 10

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Frieze London

Cindy Sherman
Untitled, 2020
Polyester, wool, acrylic, silk and cotton mercurisé woven together
284 × 190 cm
111 13/16 × 74 13/16 inches
Edition of 10

Cindy Sherman
Untitled, 2020
Polyester, wool, acrylic, silk and cotton mercurisé woven together
284 × 190 cm
111 13/16 × 74 13/16 inches
Edition of 10

Frieze London
Frieze London

Cindy Sherman
Untitled, 2020 (detail)

Frieze London
Frieze London

Cindy Sherman
Untitled, 2020 (detail)

Frieze London
Frieze London

Cindy Sherman
Untitled, 2020 (detail)

Frieze London
Frieze London

Cindy Sherman
Untitled, 2020 (detail)

Frieze London
Frieze London

Cindy Sherman
Untitled, 2020 (detail)

Frieze London

Cindy Sherman
Untitled, 2020 (installation view)
Polyester, wool, acrylic, silk and cotton mercurisé woven together
284 × 190 cm
111 13/16 × 74 13/16 inches
Edition of 10

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Frieze London

Cindy Sherman
Untitled, 2020 (detail)

Over the past four decades, Cindy Sherman has created photographic portraits that are grounded in themes of identity, gender and role-play. Taking on the role of both photographer and model, Sherman adopts limitless guises—housewife, clown, Madonna and man—that illuminate the performative nature of subjectivity and sexuality. This practice, pushed to its furthest boundaries, has made her one of the most influential artists of her generation. In the last year, Sherman has moved her practice in a new direction: the medium of tapestry, producing her first-ever non-photographic series of work (though the content derives from images found on the artist’s much-followed Instagram account). Untitled (2020) features a new version of Sherman, this time purple-faced and pink-haired with bright yellow eye shadow and gargantuan, spider-like fake eyelashes, arm outstretched as though she is taking a selfie against the setting sun. By using an app to alter her appearance, Sherman employs the tactics of social media in order to explore and exploit our relationship with ourselves and show how an image of oneself can contain little truth of real life.

Untitled is located in Los Angeles. Please contact us if you would like to arrange a viewing.

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Frieze London

Cindy Sherman
Untitled, 2020 (detail)

Over the past four decades, Cindy Sherman has created photographic portraits that are grounded in themes of identity, gender and role-play. Taking on the role of both photographer and model, Sherman adopts limitless guises—housewife, clown, Madonna and man—that illuminate the performative nature of subjectivity and sexuality. This practice, pushed to its furthest boundaries, has made her one of the most influential artists of her generation. In the last year, Sherman has moved her practice in a new direction: the medium of tapestry, producing her first-ever non-photographic series of work (though the content derives from images found on the artist’s much-followed Instagram account). Untitled (2020) features a new version of Sherman, this time purple-faced and pink-haired with bright yellow eye shadow and gargantuan, spider-like fake eyelashes, arm outstretched as though she is taking a selfie against the setting sun. By using an app to alter her appearance, Sherman employs the tactics of social media in order to explore and exploit our relationship with ourselves and show how an image of oneself can contain little truth of real life.

Untitled is located in Los Angeles. Please contact us if you would like to arrange a viewing.

Frieze London

Cindy Sherman
Untitled Film Still #64, 1980
Gelatin silver print
76.2 × 101.6 cm
30 × 40 inches
Edition of 3

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Cindy Sherman
Untitled Film Still #64, 1980
Gelatin silver print
76.2 × 101.6 cm
30 × 40 inches
Edition of 3

Cindy Sherman
Untitled Film Still #64, 1980
Gelatin silver print
76.2 × 101.6 cm
30 × 40 inches
Edition of 3

Frieze London
Frieze London

Cindy Sherman
Untitled Film Still #64, 1980 (detail)

Frieze London
Frieze London

Cindy Sherman
Untitled Film Still #64, 1980 (detail)

Frieze London
Frieze London

Cindy Sherman
Untitled Film Still #64, 1980 (installation view)
Gelatin silver print
76.2 × 101.6 cm
30 × 40 inches
Edition of 3

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Cindy Sherman’s iconic Untitled Film Stills, a suite of 70 black-and-white photographs completed between 1977 and 1980, see the artist pose in the guise of various generic and fictionalized female film characters—from working girl to repressed housewife, bombshell to vamp, rebel to ingénue. Untitled Film Still #64 employs cinematic compositional tools from various genres of the 1950s and 1960s with consummate finesse. Elegantly yet simply dressed, the woman at the center of the scene stands paralleled by the architectural elements that surround her, with something of a clandestine nature to the scene, highlighted by the play between contrasts of light and shadow. The character intrigues the viewer, but the air of mystery of the figure and setting simultaneously contributes to a feeling of voyeurism that Sherman is purposefully exposing and conveying. The deliberate snapshot staging suggests the presence of a wider narrative of which the viewer is as yet unaware, and thus denied the fulfillment of knowing; they are left to contemplate their own participation in this moment, the nature of their gaze and the construction of the scene they are observing.

Cindy Sherman’s solo exhibition at Fondation Louis Vuitton, which brings together some 170 works by the artists, is on view through January 3, 2021.

 

Rosemarie Trockel
Frieze London

Rosemarie Trockel
Dans la Rue, 2019
Ceramics, glazed and velvet
85 × 63 × 10 cm
33 1/2 × 24 7/8 × 4 inches
Edition of 1 + 1 AP

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Rosemarie Trockel
Dans la Rue, 2019
Ceramics, glazed and velvet
85 × 63 × 10 cm
33 1/2 × 24 7/8 × 4 inches
Edition of 1 + 1 AP

Rosemarie Trockel
Dans la Rue, 2019
Ceramics, glazed and velvet
85 × 63 × 10 cm
33 1/2 × 24 7/8 × 4 inches
Edition of 1 + 1 AP

Frieze London
Frieze London

Rosemarie Trockel
Dans la Rue, 2019 (detail)

Frieze London
Frieze London

Rosemarie Trockel
Dans la Rue, 2019 (installation view)
Ceramics, glazed and velvet
85 × 63 × 10 cm
33 1/2 × 24 7/8 × 4 inches
Edition of 1 + 1 AP

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Frieze London

Rosemarie Trockel
Installation view, May You Live in Interesting Times – 58th International Art Exhibition, La Biennale di Venezia, Venice, May 11–November 24, 2019. Photo: Timo Ohler

Rosemarie Trockel is a pioneer of conceptual art, providing versatility and a deeply needed female perspective to the genre since the early 1980s. With a focus on craft, Trockel employs myriad media to challenge our narrowly conceived social norms regarding the idea of the male artistic genius, gender roles and political and cultural philosophies. A sense of irony and wit always boil just below the surface of Trockel’s works, providing a subversive humor that often balances the gravitas of her subject matter. A mirror or window in a pale yellow-glazed ceramic form, Dans la Rue (2019) is a cartoon-esque object that looks straight out of a fairy tale or film set. The title inscribed in cursive lettering along its sill appears like a commercial slogan—or is it a reference to the French gilets jaunes protests of the last few years? Curious and obstinate, the wall-mounted sculpture presents itself to the viewer as an inaccessible window, providing no clues as to what could be seen beyond (or what has been covered up). 

Dans la Rue is located in Berlin. Please contact us if you would like to arrange a viewing.

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Frieze London

Rosemarie Trockel
Installation view, May You Live in Interesting Times – 58th International Art Exhibition, La Biennale di Venezia, Venice, May 11–November 24, 2019. Photo: Timo Ohler

Rosemarie Trockel is a pioneer of conceptual art, providing versatility and a deeply needed female perspective to the genre since the early 1980s. With a focus on craft, Trockel employs myriad media to challenge our narrowly conceived social norms regarding the idea of the male artistic genius, gender roles and political and cultural philosophies. A sense of irony and wit always boil just below the surface of Trockel’s works, providing a subversive humor that often balances the gravitas of her subject matter. A mirror or window in a pale yellow-glazed ceramic form, Dans la Rue (2019) is a cartoon-esque object that looks straight out of a fairy tale or film set. The title inscribed in cursive lettering along its sill appears like a commercial slogan—or is it a reference to the French gilets jaunes protests of the last few years? Curious and obstinate, the wall-mounted sculpture presents itself to the viewer as an inaccessible window, providing no clues as to what could be seen beyond (or what has been covered up). 

Dans la Rue is located in Berlin. Please contact us if you would like to arrange a viewing.

Kaari Upson
Frieze London

Kaari Upson
Trashole, 2014
Urethane and pigment
165.1 × 188 × 132.1 cm
65 × 74 × 52 inches

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Kaari Upson
Trashole, 2014
Urethane and pigment
165.1 × 188 × 132.1 cm
65 × 74 × 52 inches

Kaari Upson
Trashole, 2014
Urethane and pigment
165.1 × 188 × 132.1 cm
65 × 74 × 52 inches

Frieze London
Frieze London

Kaari Upson
Installation view, Ramiken Crucible, New York, November 1—December 14, 2014

Frieze London
Frieze London

Kaari Upson
Installation view, Ramiken Crucible, New York, November 1—December 14, 2014

Frieze London
Frieze London

Kaari Upson
Installation view, Ramiken Crucible, New York, November 1—December 14, 2014

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Kaari Upson has created a groundbreaking body of work that delves into the deep-seeded motivations and urges that inform the human experience. In obsessively composed drawings, haunting paintings, engaging videos and sculptures that range from intimate objects to room-sized installations, the artist explores the nature of our relationships with ourselves and others. Trashole (2014) is a key example of Upson's sculptures cast from domestic objects—including mattresses, doors, sofas and chairs—which she transforms into uncanny, often grotesque forms via the casting and mold-making process. This large black work with a hole at its center sinks into a corner, filling the space not just physically through its puffy, billowing form, but also metaphorically: Is this orifice a portal to somewhere, perhaps an alternate universe or the dark recesses of someone's psyche? A recurring image in Upson's work, including in Trashole, is that of the threshold, which she deploys symbolically as a passageway to other emotional and psychological states.

 

Kara Walker

Kara Walker
National Archives Microfilm M999 Roll 34: Bureau of Refugees, Freedmen and Abandoned Lands: Lucy of Pulaski, 2009
Colour video, audio, DVD and digital beta master
12:08 minutes
Edition of 5 + 2 AP

Details

Kara Walker
National Archives Microfilm M999 Roll 34: Bureau of Refugees, Freedmen and Abandoned Lands: Lucy of Pulaski, 2009
Colour video, audio, DVD and digital beta master
12:08 minutes
Edition of 5 + 2 AP

Kara Walker
National Archives Microfilm M999 Roll 34: Bureau of Refugees, Freedmen and Abandoned Lands: Lucy of Pulaski, 2009
Colour video, audio, DVD and digital beta master
12:08 minutes
Edition of 5 + 2 AP

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Film has long played a crucial role in Kara Walker’s groundbreaking artistic practice, and her work with moving images incorporates her signature use of silhouettes and her insightful handling of pictorial space. In 2009, Walker produced two works that further deepened her examination into history and narrative, inspired by her research into the United States National Archives on the War Department’s Bureau of Refugees, Freedmen and Abandoned Lands. Established in 1865 following the Civil War to assist former slaves as they transitioned to freedom, the Freedmen’s Bureau kept records of the brutality inflicted on African Americans during this chaotic era. Working with musicians Jason and Alicia Moran, who created the textured soundtrack, Walker composes a visual world that is equally dissonant and melodic, and which continues her investigation into both the American family and what the spiritually orphaned black figure looks like in a landscape defined by loss and violence.

 

Kara Walker
Untitled (Head), 2014
Cut paper
24.13 × 15.24 × 15.24 cm (approximate)
9 1/2 × 6 × 6 inches (approximate)

Celebrated for her unsparing look at American history and society, particularly as it relates to the African-American experience and its roots in slavery, Kara Walker has produced a range of thought-provoking and unflinching works since she burst onto the contemporary art scene in the 1990s. Untitled (Head) (2014) takes up the form for which she is best known: The cut-paper silhouette. Two planes of black paper, carefully and gracefully shaped, intersect to delineate the profile of a man. His exaggerated lips and close-cropped curly hair suggest racialized stereotypes of African features, and in the context of Walker's work, which often situates its narratives in the Antebellum American South, he may represent an enslaved man or other figure from the Civil War era. The form protruding from the figure's head resembles the neck of a bottle, recalling ancient anthropomorphic vases and drinking vessels but also evoking the commodification of human beings that defines the institution of slavery. Moreover, the dual-faced nature of the depiction suggests Janus, the Roman god of beginnings, transitions and endings, whose two visages are said to look simultaneously to the past and the future.

Details

Kara Walker
Untitled (Head), 2014
Cut paper
24.13 × 15.24 × 15.24 cm (approximate)
9 1/2 × 6 × 6 inches (approximate)

Details
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Celebrated for her unsparing look at American history and society, particularly as it relates to the African-American experience and its roots in slavery, Kara Walker has produced a range of thought-provoking and unflinching works since she burst onto the contemporary art scene in the 1990s. Untitled (Head) (2014) takes up the form for which she is best known: The cut-paper silhouette. Two planes of black paper, carefully and gracefully shaped, intersect to delineate the profile of a man. His exaggerated lips and close-cropped curly hair suggest racialized stereotypes of African features, and in the context of Walker's work, which often situates its narratives in the Antebellum American South, he may represent an enslaved man or other figure from the Civil War era. The form protruding from the figure's head resembles the neck of a bottle, recalling ancient anthropomorphic vases and drinking vessels but also evoking the commodification of human beings that defines the institution of slavery. Moreover, the dual-faced nature of the depiction suggests Janus, the Roman god of beginnings, transitions and endings, whose two visages are said to look simultaneously to the past and the future.

Andro Wekua
Frieze London

Andro Wekua
B.Portrait, two II, 2020
Oil paint, silk-screen ink and varnish on aluminum panel
100 × 70 cm
39 3/8 × 27 5/8 inches
102 × 72 cm (framed)
40 1/8 × 28 3/8 inches (framed)

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Andro Wekua
B.Portrait, two II, 2020
Oil paint, silk-screen ink and varnish on aluminum panel
100 × 70 cm
39 3/8 × 27 5/8 inches
102 × 72 cm (framed)
40 1/8 × 28 3/8 inches (framed)

Andro Wekua
B.Portrait, two II, 2020
Oil paint, silk-screen ink and varnish on aluminum panel
100 × 70 cm
39 3/8 × 27 5/8 inches
102 × 72 cm (framed)
40 1/8 × 28 3/8 inches (framed)

Frieze London
Frieze London

Andro Wekua
B.Portrait, two II, 2020 (detail)

Frieze London
Frieze London

Andro Wekua
B.Portrait, two II, 2020 (detail)

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Andro Wekua’s wide-ranging body of work explores the gaps and overlaps between memory, fantasy and cultural histories. The Georgian artist’s tenuous relationship to his country manifests itself in his media and methods, creating mysterious and unsettling images in which figures are hidden away, surfaces are scratched or effaced and colors are opaquely layered. B.Portrait, two II (2020) is a painting based on collage elements: Using a painterly silkscreening process, Wekua transfers collages onto aluminum-composite panels, which he then covers with layers of oil paint. A rich, streaky blue permeates this work, creating a fog through which a seated ghostly figure peeks out, arms crossed. A burst of color comes from the figure’s single visible hand, which claws through the blue and provides a moment of clarity with its defined digits and bright pinks and oranges. Recalling Wekua’s seaside hometown of Sukhumi, now derelict and war-torn, this work is perhaps the product of a fading memory—that of Sukhumi or the artist himself living there, feeling reality slip through his fingers.