Andreas Schulze

Andreas Schulze. Photo: Philip Emde

 

Andreas Schulze (*1955) is one of the great individualists of German painting. The artist’s unique painting style defamiliarizes basic design and architectural forms, with a cryptic pictorial repertoire that oscillates between gentle irony and friendly affirmation, menace and comfort. It exposes the blind spots of middle-class life and ironizes the pretensions of contemporary art. The Cologne-based artist has been associated with the gallery since 1983.

 

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Since the beginning of his career on the Cologne scene in the 1980s, Schulze’s work deliberately situates itself outside of common painterly trends, attitudes and affiliations. Despite contacts to the Neue Wilde (New Fauves) of the Mülheimer Freiheit group and other Cologne artists, the painter developed his own distinctive way of painting that combines the representational with the absurd.

His repertoire of middle-class emblems thrives on the almost brazen simplicity of their pictorial settings. The “subjects” of these renderings include such commonplace things as peas, geraniums, fruit or porcelain dishes. Everyday objects such as sofas, cars, windows, rocks or Mars bars are arranged in humorous tableaux. Shaded geometric and biomorphic sausage-like shapes are contrasted with spherical color gradients in the background. Built-in kitchen cabinets, absurd pipe constructions or the kind of fringed roller found in a car wash are interspersed with abstracted household objects and the occasional indoor plant. Interiors and landscapes merge. Prefabricated houses are captured in an oblique bird’s eye view. In series that he revisits again and again, Schulze paints pictures of spheres and windows. His car paintings resemble assemblages of car doors, bumpers, and windshields, masterfully-painted yet quite possibly cobbled together by a mischievous child. Although primarily active as a painter, Schulze has repeatedly expanded his artistic universe to include sculptures and installations. He has also designed lamps and carpets himself and staged living room interiors on floor paintings that can resemble a lawn or a street intersection.

For all his independence, Schulze brings a multitude of art historical references to the fore: from Oskar Schlemmer’s Triadisches Ballett (Triadic Ballet) to Pop, surrealism and naïve painting. Yet he also defies the avant-garde propensity for assuming a superior stance of profundity. Balancing on the fine line between representation and abstraction, he carves out our collective pictorial understandings of miscellaneous everyday objects while simultaneously subjecting them to a kind of humorous destabilization. The objects are recognizable as such, and yet they also resemble patterns, designs or ornaments. They always exude something almost surreal; infused with an intrinsic logic of painterly comedy, they often have the look of something puffed-up and soft, if not inflated.

In radically simplifying his everyday subjects and thereby depriving them of their already rather banal meaning, Schulze forces viewers to question their fundamental nature. His work alternates between familiarity and strangeness and seems to express a fear of our increasingly complex society. It is an oeuvre that seems to make fun of middle-class trappings and their fetishization while also showing great sympathy and understanding about the need for such fetishes.

 

Andreas Schulze: Nebel im Wohnzimmer
Kunstmuseum St. Gallen, March 6–May 17, 2015
Film by Julia Martinez /art-tv.ch 2015

Works
Andreas Schulze
Andreas Schulze
Untitled (Self-portrait), 2002

Andreas Schulze
Untitled, 2002
Acrylic on nettle cloth
220 × 350 cm (2 parts)
86 5/8 × 137 7/8 inches (2 parts)

Andreas Schulze
Andreas Schulze
Untitled (The Duchess of Urbino), 2019

Andreas Schulze
Untitled (The Duchess of Urbino), 2019
Acrylic on nettle cloth
200 × 170 cm
78 3/4 × 67 inches

Andreas Schulze
Andreas Schulze
Untitled (Vacanze 22), 2017

Andreas Schulze
Untitled (Vacanze 22), 2017
Acrylic on nettle cloth
170 × 230 cm
67 × 90 1/2 inches

Andreas Schulze
Andreas Schulze
Untitled, 1982

Andreas Schulze
Untitled, 1982
Acrylic on nettle cloth
270 × 600 cm (3 parts)
106 1/4 × 236 1/8 inches (3 parts)

Andreas Schulze
Andreas Schulze
Untitled (Sea Vista 6), 2015

Andreas Schulze
Untitled (Sea Vista 6), 2015
Acrylic on nettle cloth
140 × 160 cm
55 1/8 × 63 inches

Andreas Schulze
Andreas Schulze
Untitled (Cheerful Octopus), 2015

Andreas Schulze
Untitled (Cheerful Octopus), 2015
Acrylic on nettle cloth
110 × 100 cm
43 1/4 × 39 3/8 inches

Andreas Schulze
Andreas Schulze
Untitled (Window with blue frame), 2019

Andreas Schulze
Untitled (Window with blue frame), 2019
Acrylic on nettle cloth
100 × 100 cm
39 3/8 × 39 3/8 inches

Andreas Schulze
Andreas Schulze
Untitled (Green animal from below), 2014

Andreas Schulze
Untitled (Green animal from below), 2014
Acrylic on nettle cloth
160 × 160 cm
63 × 63 inches

Andreas Schulze
Andreas Schulze
Untitled (Ich kaufe nichts), 2004

Andreas Schulze
Untitled (Ich kaufe nichts), 2004
Acrylic on nettle cloth
200 × 440 cm (2 parts)
78 3/4 × 173 1/4 inches (2 parts)

Andreas Schulze
Andreas Schulze
Untitled (Colorful Wesseling 12), 2016

Andreas Schulze
Untitled (Colorful Wesseling 12), 2016
Acrylic on nettle cloth
200 × 200 cm
78 3/4 × 78 3/4 inches

Andreas Schulze
Andreas Schulze
Untitled (Charlie Browner), 2014

Andreas Schulze
Untitled (Charlie Browner), 2014
Acrylic on nettle cloth
170 × 230 cm
67 × 90 1/2 inches

Andreas Schulze
Andreas Schulze
Untitled (Sofa with vineyard II), 2003

Andreas Schulze
Untitled (Sofa mit Weinberg II)
Acrylic on nettle cloth
200 × 360 cm (2 parts)
78 3/4 × 141 3/4 inches (2 parts)

Andreas Schulze
Andreas Schulze
Untitled, 1982

Andreas Schulze
Untitled
Acrylic on nettle cloth
200 × 400 cm (2 parts)
78 3/4 × 157 1/2 inches (2 parts)

Andreas Schulze
Andreas Schulze
Glasses, 1984

Andreas Schulze
Glasses, 1984
Acrylic on nettle cloth
200 × 400 cm (2 parts)
78 3/4 × 157 1/2 inches (2 parts)

Details
Andreas Schulze

Andreas Schulze
Untitled, 2002
Acrylic on nettle cloth
220 × 350 cm (2 parts)
86 5/8 × 137 7/8 inches (2 parts)

Andreas Schulze
Untitled (Self-portrait), 2002
Andreas Schulze

Andreas Schulze
Untitled (The Duchess of Urbino), 2019
Acrylic on nettle cloth
200 × 170 cm
78 3/4 × 67 inches

Andreas Schulze
Untitled (The Duchess of Urbino), 2019
Andreas Schulze

Andreas Schulze
Untitled (Vacanze 22), 2017
Acrylic on nettle cloth
170 × 230 cm
67 × 90 1/2 inches

Andreas Schulze
Untitled (Vacanze 22), 2017
Andreas Schulze

Andreas Schulze
Untitled, 1982
Acrylic on nettle cloth
270 × 600 cm (3 parts)
106 1/4 × 236 1/8 inches (3 parts)

Andreas Schulze
Untitled, 1982
Andreas Schulze

Andreas Schulze
Untitled (Sea Vista 6), 2015
Acrylic on nettle cloth
140 × 160 cm
55 1/8 × 63 inches

Andreas Schulze
Untitled (Sea Vista 6), 2015
Andreas Schulze

Andreas Schulze
Untitled (Cheerful Octopus), 2015
Acrylic on nettle cloth
110 × 100 cm
43 1/4 × 39 3/8 inches

Andreas Schulze
Untitled (Cheerful Octopus), 2015
Andreas Schulze

Andreas Schulze
Untitled (Window with blue frame), 2019
Acrylic on nettle cloth
100 × 100 cm
39 3/8 × 39 3/8 inches

Andreas Schulze
Untitled (Window with blue frame), 2019
Andreas Schulze

Andreas Schulze
Untitled (Green animal from below), 2014
Acrylic on nettle cloth
160 × 160 cm
63 × 63 inches

Andreas Schulze
Untitled (Green animal from below), 2014
Andreas Schulze

Andreas Schulze
Untitled (Ich kaufe nichts), 2004
Acrylic on nettle cloth
200 × 440 cm (2 parts)
78 3/4 × 173 1/4 inches (2 parts)

Andreas Schulze
Untitled (Ich kaufe nichts), 2004
Andreas Schulze

Andreas Schulze
Untitled (Colorful Wesseling 12), 2016
Acrylic on nettle cloth
200 × 200 cm
78 3/4 × 78 3/4 inches

Andreas Schulze
Untitled (Colorful Wesseling 12), 2016
Andreas Schulze

Andreas Schulze
Untitled (Charlie Browner), 2014
Acrylic on nettle cloth
170 × 230 cm
67 × 90 1/2 inches

Andreas Schulze
Untitled (Charlie Browner), 2014
Andreas Schulze

Andreas Schulze
Untitled (Sofa mit Weinberg II)
Acrylic on nettle cloth
200 × 360 cm (2 parts)
78 3/4 × 141 3/4 inches (2 parts)

Andreas Schulze
Untitled (Sofa with vineyard II), 2003
Andreas Schulze

Andreas Schulze
Untitled
Acrylic on nettle cloth
200 × 400 cm (2 parts)
78 3/4 × 157 1/2 inches (2 parts)

Andreas Schulze
Untitled, 1982
Andreas Schulze

Andreas Schulze
Glasses, 1984
Acrylic on nettle cloth
200 × 400 cm (2 parts)
78 3/4 × 157 1/2 inches (2 parts)

Andreas Schulze
Glasses, 1984
Details
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Current and Upcoming
Andreas Schulze
Andreas Schulze, Ohne Titel (Haltestelle Treiber Pfad), 2021 (detail)
VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn. Photo: Jochen Arentzen

Andreas Schulze
Haltestelle
FUHRWERKSWAAGE, Cologne
Through December 12, 2021

Developed specifically for the FUHRWERKSWAAGE, the exhibition Haltestelle by Andreas Schulze incorporates a range of references to the exhibition site. The artist works with the pair of tall cathedral glass windows in the main hall for example, framing them on three sides with a brickwork pattern painted on canvas, thus quoting the building's exterior wall inside.. A metal segment of “track” ‘in the center of this space references the nearby tram line 16, which stops here–a place shaped in a particular way by both movement and standstill. This contradiction is made palpable through the unique pictorial language of two paintings in the exhibition depicting transit stops.
The surroundings of the FUHRWERKSWAAGE exhibition site, its former use, and thus also its architecture are brought to the fore. Never before has an artist engaged so intensively with the unusual constellation of the location as both a place for art, and a transit nexus in southern Cologne.
Five new, large-format works and the sculpture dominate the space–transforming it into a temporary stopping place.

Link
Exhibitions at Sprüth Magers
Andreas Schulze

Andreas Schulze
October 22–November 20, 2020
Online

Andreas Schulze and Sprüth Magers have a shared history. In February 1983 Monika Sprüth opened her Cologne gallery with an Andreas Schulze exhibition, and since that fateful day he has had fifteen solo exhibitions with the gallery, in Berlin, London and Los Angeles. He has also exhibited widely in museums, including a solo exhibition at Villa Merkel, Esslingen (2014), which travelled to the Kunstmuseum Bonn and Kunstmuseum St. Gallen (2015). Most recently, he had a solo exhibition at the Kunsthalle Bielefeld (2018). Kunsthalle Nuremberg will host a comprehensive solo exhibition in February 2022.

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Andreas Schulze
Traffic Jam
November 15–December 23, 2016
Los Angeles

The visible also always conveys the invisible. All the more so in the cheerful world of consumerism, in which we live today. The more perfect its surfaces, the more its opposites also seem to resonate – the suppressed and the absurd. No painter has understood this better than Andreas Schulze. The Cologne based artist, who has been associated with the gallery since 1983 and a professor at the Kunstakademie in Düsseldorf since 2008, examines the most mundane objects from his personal surroundings.

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Andreas Schulze
Andreas Schulze

Andreas Schulze
Stau
July 28–August 29, 2015
Berlin

The visible also always conveys the invisible. All the more so in the cheerful world of consumerism, in which we live today. The more perfect its surfaces, the more its opposites also seem to resonate – the suppressed and the absurd. No painter has understood this better than Andreas Schulze. The Cologne based artist, who has been associated with the gallery since 1983 and a professor at the Kunstakademie in Düsseldorf since 2008, examines the most mundane objects from his personal surroundings.

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Andreas Schulze
Looking and Listening
June 28–August 17, 2013
London

In his second solo show at the London gallery, the artist will present two ceramic sculptures alongside a selection of paintings, depicting landscapes inspired by the artist’s recent expedition to the island of Sicily. Schulze has been recognised as an inventor of new pictorial worlds, having developed an autonomous and unmistakable visual language with which to explore various interior views of society. A fundamental theme in the artist’s work is the power of painting to create illusion, giving multifaceted treatment to the theme of the interplay between being and appearance, reality and staging in the medium of painting.

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Andreas Schulze
Andreas Schulze

Andreas Schulze
March 2–April 13, 2013
Berlin

In his third solo show at the Berlin gallery, the artist will present two ceramic sculptures alongside a selection of paintings, depicting landscapes inspired by the artist’s recent expedition to the island of Sicily. Schulze has since been recognised as an inventor of new pictorial worlds, having developed an autonomous and unmistakable visual language with which to explore various interior views of society. A fundamental theme in the artist’s work is the power of painting to create illusion, giving multifaceted treatment to the theme of the interplay between being and appearance, reality and staging in the medium of painting.

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Malerei der 80er Jahre
Andreas Schulze, Richard Artschwager, Ashley Bickerton, Albert Oehlen, Malcolm Morley
curated by Albert Oehlen
November 9, 2012–January 12, 2013
Berlin

Andreas Schulze
Andreas Schulze

Andreas Schulze
January 15–March 23, 2011
Berlin

Ever since the 1980s, Andreas Schulze has focused on various interior views of our society. Most often, his works depict everyday landscapes and bourgeois idylls which he constructs as subtle, parallel worlds to reality. His early paintings consist of intensely colored compositions in which the dimensions of sculptural globes and other geometrical forms are shifted and inner pictorial perspectives constantly change. In the exhbition, Schulze is presenting his works in a specific setting within the exhibition space, which thereby becomes a component of the suggestive pictorial spaces. The arrangement interweaves real and fictional space, and develops a productive interplay between painting and installation.

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Andreas Schulze
July 2–August 21, 2010
Berlin

At the center of the installation is the model of a miniature city from Schulze's collection of model trains. The walls of the exhibition room are covered with wallpaper and surround the model like a landscape; posters advertise the tourist attractions of Saxony and Dresden. With this model, however, it is a matter not of a true-to-reality representation, but of a fictional cityscape which is drawn from personal and narrated memories, information conveyed by the media, and associational set-pieces. Similarly as in other works, Andreas Schulze is concerned here with an approach to reality, with the possibilities of its representation and the emphasizing of the artificiality of this depiction.

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Andreas Schulze
Andreas Schulze

Andreas Schulze
Flowers & Landscapes
June 3–August 28, 2009
London

Presenting five ceramic sculptures and two major new paintings, the exhibition showcases the appealing complexity and subversive luminosity of Schulze’s craft, a practice which has earned him widespread respect and extensive influence amongst both his contemporaries and younger artists for over three decades. Dominating the exhibition are two large-scale paintings which typify Schulze’s vibrant and powerful visual style. While stylistically Schulze’s paintings have often echoed and indeed drawn on a Modernist painting tradition which stretches back to artists such as Giorgio de Chirico, conceptually and attitudinally his work is suffused with the postmodern sensibility of his contemporaries. Juxtaposed against the Unheimliche atmosphere of Schulze’s paintings are his more playful and ebullient, yet nonetheless ironic evocations of the Gemütlich in the ceramic sculptures.

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Andreas Schulze

Mondi Possibili
Thea Djordjadze, Peter Fischli  David Weiss, Claus Föttinger, Thomas Grünfeld, Jenny Holzer, Stefan Kern, Joseph Kosuth, Louise Lawler, Michail Pirgelis, Michelangelo Pistoletto, Thomas Scheibitz, Andreas Schulze, Cindy Sherman, Rosemarie Trockel, Franz West
January 17–April 7, 2006
Cologne

As part of the PASSAGEN, the supporting programme of the International Furniture Fair in Cologne, at the beginning of the year Monika Sprüth and Philomene Magers present a new edition of the exhibition “Mondi Possibili”. The works on display deal with the subject of furniture from a variety of angles: as citation, as homage, as adaptation, or as copy. Others are usable objects that hardly differ from their reference objects in the domain of design or furniture.

Andreas Schulze

Malerei
George Condo, Axel Kasseböhmer, Thomas Scheibitz, Andreas Schulze
May 4–June 19, 2004
Munich

Malerei 7
Peter Fischli  David Weiss, George Condo, Axel Kasseböhmer, Frances Scholz, Andreas Schulze, Walter Dahn, Siegfried Anzinger, Thomas Scheibitz
October 30, 2003–January 31, 2004
Cologne

Andreas Schulze
Andreas Schulze

Shadow and Light
Richard Artschwager, John Baldessari, Matthew Barney, George Condo, Walter Dahn, Olafur Eliasson, Martin Fengel, Peter Fischli  David Weiss, Dan Flavin, Sylvie Fleury, Gilbert & George, Dan Graham, Thomas Grünfeld, Andreas Gursky, Stefan Hirsig, Jenny Holzer, Axel Kasseböhmer, Stefan Kern, Karen Kilimnik, Astrid Klein, Louise Lawler, Anne Loch, Paul Morrison, Jean-Luc Mylayne, Bruce Nauman, Manuel Ocampo, Nam June Paik, Hirsch Perlman, Lari Pittman, Barbara Probst, Gerhard Richter, Ed Ruscha, Robert Ryman, Frances Scholz, Andreas Schulze, Cindy Sherman, Paul Sietsema, Rosemarie Trockel, Kara Walker, Andy Warhol, Christopher Wool, Martin Wöhrl, Philip-Lorca diCorcia
July 26–August 31, 2003
Salzburg

Monika Sprüth and Philomene Magers will open a temporary space in Salzburg together with their London partner Simon Lee for the duration of the Salzburg Festival. One of the main reasons for this was the fact that the galleries are traditionally closed in August and that exhibition operations are shut down, but at the same time cultural life is at its peak in Salzburg, not far from our Munich location. It makes sense to contribute something to the cultural climate with a precisely formulated group exhibition and at the same time to reach a sophisticated international audience.

20th Anniversary Show
John Baldessari, Alighiero Boetti, George Condo, Walter Dahn, Thomas Demand, Thea Djordjadze, Peter Fischli  David Weiss, Sylvie Fleury, Andreas Gursky, Jenny Holzer, Gary Hume, Axel Kasseböhmer, Karen Kilimnik, Astrid Klein, Barbara Kruger, Louise Lawler, Jean-Luc Mylayne, Nina Pohl, Richard Prince, Ed Ruscha, Frances Scholz, Andreas Schulze, Cindy Sherman, Rosemarie Trockel, Andrea Zittel, Philip-Lorca diCorcia
April 25–October 18, 2003
Cologne

In 1983, Monika Sprüth opened her Cologne based gallery with a solo show by Andreas Schulze. Starting from the idea to establish a forum for young and unknown artists, the central focus of the gallery concept was developed in the discourse of the 80s. The gallery program was completed by recourses to artistic attitudes of the last 40 years. This research, motivated by reflection on contemporary art history, was more and more realized in cooperation with Philomene Magers who directed her Bonn gallery since 1992. After a few years of loose cooperation, Monika Sprüth Gallery and Philomene Magers Gallery aligned with each other after, and together the Monika Sprüth / Philomene Magers Gallery opened up in Munich in 1999.

Andreas Schulze
Andreas Schulze

Reflexions
Carl André, John Armleder, John Baldessari, Sylvie Fleury, Isa Genzken, Thomas Grünfeld, Stephan Jung, Karen Kilimnik, Jeff Koons, Louise Lawler, Robert Morris, Paul Morrison, Andreas Schulze, Andy Warhol, Franz West, Heimo Zobernig
January 24–March 1, 2002
Munich

Spy
Thomas Grünfeld, Gary Hume, Andreas Schulze
October 2–December 8, 2001
Cologne

Andreas Schulze
Andreas Schulze

Malerei VI
George Condo, Lucy McKenzie, Andreas Schulze, Monika Baer, Dirk Bell, Gillian Carnegie, Thomas Eggerer, Michael Krebber, Picco Gabriele
September 8–October 21, 2000
Cologne

Tutto Tondo
Curtis Anderson, Guglielmo Aschieri, Donald Baechler, John Baldessari, Ilaria Bona, Angela Bulloch, George Condo, Walter Dahn, Jürgen Drescher, Peter Fend, Peter Fischli  David Weiss, Anne Loch, Piero Manzoni, Annette Messager, A. R. Penck, Gerhard Richter, Salvo, Andreas Schulze, Rosemarie Trockel
February 4–March 13, 1993
Cologne

Andreas Schulze
Andreas Schulze

Andreas Schulze
November 13, 1992–January 30, 1993
Cologne

Künstler der Galerie
Peter Fischli  David Weiss, Rosemarie Trockel, George Condo, Axel Kasseböhmer, Cindy Sherman, Jenny Holzer, Barbara Kruger, Anne Loch, Andreas Schulze, Thomas Wachweger, Milan Kunc, Ina Barfuss
June 13–July 15, 1987
Cologne

Andreas Schulze
Press

Andreas Schulze
Luncheon, a conversation between Andreas Schulze, David Ostrowski and Michail Pirgelis, text by Claire de Dobay Rifelj and Dorothee Sorge, Autumn/Winter 2020

Es ist immer was dahinter. Andreas Schulze
Blau, article by Hans-Joachim Müller, July-August 2015

Cool heisst doch auch nur angepasst
AD Architectural Digest, September 2011

Andreas Schulze
Frieze, article by Jörg Heiser, October 2010

350. Stunde im July 2010. Nach dem Feierabend der Abstraktion
Textezurkunst, article by Gunnar Reski, July 15, 2010

Der Idiot der Familie
Parkett, articles Wilfried Dickhoff, 1986

Biography

Andreas Schulze (*1955, Hanover) lives in Cologne. Amongst others, his works were on display in the solo exhibition at Kunsthalle Bielefeld (2018); the touring exhibition at Villa Merkel in Esslingen (2014), Kunstmuseum St. Gallen (2015) and Kunstmuseum Bonn (2014); Schirn Kunsthalle Frankfurt (2014); Falckenberg Collection, Hamburg and Leopold-Hoesch-Museum, Dueren (both 2010); Monika Sprüth Galerie, Cologne (1983). Schulze’s works have been represented in important exhibitions, including Städel Museum Frankfurt (2015); Deichtorhallen, Hamburg (2000); Triennale di Milano (1997); Kunstforeningen, Copenhagen (1988); MoMA – Museum of Modern Art, New York (1984) and Tate Britain, London (1983). 

Education
1976–78 Gesamthochschule Kassel (Painting class)
1978–83 Staatliche Kunstakademie Düsseldorf, Dusseldorf (Professor Dieter Krieg)
1983 Master student with Professor Dieter Krieg
Teaching
2008– Professor of Painting, Staatliche Kunstakademie Düsseldorf, Dusseldorf
Awards, Grants and Fellowships
2010 Cologne Fine Art Prize
1997 Sprengel-Preis für Bildende Kunst, Niedersächsische Sparkassenstiftung, Hanover
Public Collections
Deichtorhallen Hamburg
Henkel - The Art Collection, Dusseldorf
KAI 10 / Arthena Foundation, Dusseldorf
Kunstmuseum St. Gallen
Kunstmuseum Bonn
Kunstsammlung der Provinzial Rheinland Versicherung, Dusseldorf
Kunstakademie Düsseldorf, Dusseldorf
Leopold-Hoesch-Museum, Dueren
Ludwig Forum für Internationale Kunst, Aachen
Museum Ludwig, Cologne
Sammlung der ehemaligen Dresdner Bank, Frankfurt
Sammlung Deutsche Bank, Frankfurt
Sammlung Landesbank Baden-Württemberg, Stuttgart
Sammlung Martin Sanders
Villa Merkel, Esslingen