Featuring the artist’s first new body of work in almost three years, Andreas Gursky’s exhibition in our Berlin gallery addresses a range of themes that the artist has investigated for decades. As he revisits settings such as the Rhine river and Hong Kong’s futuristic cityscape, Gursky looks anew at our built environment and humankind’s impact on the natural world. The exhibition also includes work from the past few years, offering an important overview of the artist’s ever-expanding “Encyclopedia of Life.”

Andreas Gursky – Andreas Gursky – Berlin

Andreas Gursky
Rhein III (Rhine III), 2018
Inkjet-print, Diasec
237.6 × 407.6 × 6.4 cm (framed)
93 1/2 × 160 1/2 × 2 1/2 inches (framed)

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Andreas Gursky – Andreas Gursky – Berlin

Andreas Gursky
Rhine II, 1999
C-print, diasec
206 × 356 × 6.2 cm (framed)
81 × 140 1/8 × 2 3/8 inches (framed)

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Andreas Gursky – Andreas Gursky – Berlin

Andreas Gursky
Rhein III (Rhine III), 2018
Inkjet-print, Diasec
237.6 × 407.6 × 6.4 cm (framed)
93 1/2 × 160 1/2 × 2 1/2 inches (framed)

Andreas Gursky
Rhein III (Rhine III), 2018
Inkjet-print, Diasec
237.6 × 407.6 × 6.4 cm (framed)
93 1/2 × 160 1/2 × 2 1/2 inches (framed)

Andreas Gursky – Andreas Gursky – Berlin
Andreas Gursky – Andreas Gursky – Berlin

Andreas Gursky
Rhein III (Rhine III), 2018 (detail)

Andreas Gursky
Rhein III (Rhine III), 2018 (detail)

Andreas Gursky – Andreas Gursky – Berlin
Andreas Gursky – Andreas Gursky – Berlin

Andreas Gursky
Rhein III (Rhine III), 2018 (detail)

Andreas Gursky
Rhein III (Rhine III), 2018 (detail)

Andreas Gursky – Andreas Gursky – Berlin

Andreas Gursky
Rhine II, 1999
C-print, diasec
206 × 356 × 6.2 cm (framed)
81 × 140 1/8 × 2 3/8 inches (framed)

Andreas Gursky
Rhine II, 1999
C-print, diasec
206 × 356 × 6.2 cm (framed)
81 × 140 1/8 × 2 3/8 inches (framed)

Andreas Gursky – Andreas Gursky – Berlin
Andreas Gursky – Andreas Gursky – Berlin

Andreas Gursky
Rhine II, 1999
C-print, diasec
206 × 356 × 6.2 cm (framed)
81 × 140 1/8 × 2 3/8 inches (framed)

Andreas Gursky
Rhine II, 1999
C-print, diasec
206 × 356 × 6.2 cm (framed)
81 × 140 1/8 × 2 3/8 inches (framed)

Andreas Gursky – Andreas Gursky – Berlin
Andreas Gursky – Andreas Gursky – Berlin

Andreas Gursky
Rhine II, 1999 (detail)

Andreas Gursky
Rhine II, 1999 (detail)

Andreas Gursky – Andreas Gursky – Berlin
Andreas Gursky – Andreas Gursky – Berlin

Andreas Gursky
Rhine II, 1999 (detail)

Andreas Gursky
Rhine II, 1999 (detail)

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Rhine III (2018–19) revisits Gursky’s important work Rhine II (1999) — the dimensions, setting and composition of both are almost identical. (Rhine II is not in the Berlin exhibition.) And yet, just twenty years later, the landscape and mood have drastically altered. The drought of summer 2018 reduced the river to a record low, and the new picture offers a dry, dystopian vision of the once flourishing riverside. As Gursky builds an “Encyclopedia of Life,” he revisits and reinterprets familiar settings, keeping up with the impact of human habitation on the appearance of the world.

 

Andreas Gursky – Andreas Gursky – Berlin

Andreas Gursky
Kreuzfahrt (Cruise), 2020
Inkjet-print, Diasec
228 × 468 × 6.7 cm (framed)
89 3/4 × 184 1/4 × 2 5/8 inches (framed)

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Andreas Gursky – Andreas Gursky – Berlin

Andreas Gursky
Kreuzfahrt (Cruise), 2020
Inkjet-print, Diasec
228 × 468 × 6.7 cm (framed)
89 3/4 × 184 1/4 × 2 5/8 inches (framed)

Andreas Gursky
Kreuzfahrt (Cruise), 2020
Inkjet-print, Diasec
228 × 468 × 6.7 cm (framed)
89 3/4 × 184 1/4 × 2 5/8 inches (framed)

Andreas Gursky – Andreas Gursky – Berlin
Andreas Gursky – Andreas Gursky – Berlin

Andreas Gursky
Cruise, 2020 (detail)

Andreas Gursky
Cruise, 2020 (detail)

Andreas Gursky – Andreas Gursky – Berlin
Andreas Gursky – Andreas Gursky – Berlin

Andreas Gursky
Cruise, 2020 (detail)

Andreas Gursky
Cruise, 2020 (detail)

Andreas Gursky – Andreas Gursky – Berlin
Andreas Gursky – Andreas Gursky – Berlin

Andreas Gursky
Kreuzfahrt (Cruise), 2020 (detail)

Andreas Gursky
Kreuzfahrt (Cruise), 2020 (detail)

Andreas Gursky – Andreas Gursky – Berlin
Andreas Gursky – Andreas Gursky – Berlin

Andreas Gursky
Kreuzfahrt (Cruise), 2020 (detail)

Andreas Gursky
Kreuzfahrt (Cruise), 2020 (detail)

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The monumental photograph Kreuzfahrt (Cruise) (2020) shows a colossal cruise ship still in the process of being constructed. Here is a human habitation atomized into a modernist grid, a hulking structure that travelers choose to inhabit temporarily, as a form of leisure. In an age of urban overcrowding, migration, and an ongoing pandemic, does the cruise ship represent a spirit of adventure, a longing for isolation or a need for anonymity? The composition, which despite the immense size of the photographic print doesn’t reveal the full scale of the cruise ship, brings to mind a vast minimalist sculpture.

 

Kreuzfahrt (Cruise) is reminiscent of Gursky’s iconic work Paris, Montparnasse (1993). For an in-depth look at how the artist’s depiction of architecture and use of pictorial space evokes a sense of time or duration, and how Gursky has responded to both the art of cinema and the omnipresence of smartphones, see our online exhibition Space is Time.

 

Andreas Gursky – Andreas Gursky – Berlin

Andreas Gursky
Bauhaus, 2020
Inkjet-print, Diasec
238 × 458 × 6.7 cm (framed)
93 3/4 × 180 1/4 × 2 5/8 inches (framed)

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Details
Andreas Gursky – Andreas Gursky – Berlin

Andreas Gursky
Bauhaus, 2020
Inkjet-print, Diasec
238 × 458 × 6.7 cm (framed)
93 3/4 × 180 1/4 × 2 5/8 inches (framed)

Andreas Gursky
Bauhaus, 2020
Inkjet-print, Diasec
238 × 458 × 6.7 cm (framed)
93 3/4 × 180 1/4 × 2 5/8 inches (framed)

Andreas Gursky – Andreas Gursky – Berlin
Andreas Gursky – Andreas Gursky – Berlin

Andreas Gursky
Bauhaus, 2020 (detail)

Andreas Gursky
Bauhaus, 2020 (detail)

Andreas Gursky – Andreas Gursky – Berlin
Andreas Gursky – Andreas Gursky – Berlin

Andreas Gursky
Bauhaus, 2020 (detail)

Andreas Gursky
Bauhaus, 2020 (detail)

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Modern living spaces, and the balancing of efficiency with quality in contemporary life, is one of the themes Gursky addresses in his work Bauhaus (2020). The functional building with the logo of the DIY store, commonplace across Germany, is shown by the artist in its cold and precise aesthetics, which at the same time bring to mind the famous art school in Weimar.

 

Andreas Gursky – Andreas Gursky – Berlin

Andreas Gursky
Apple, 2020
Inkjet-print, Diasec
307 × 235.7 × 6.2 cm (framed)
120 7/8 × 92 7/8 × 2 3/8 inches (framed)

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If the Bauhaus school left a legacy we can still see today in our urban landscape, Gursky takes up one of the most influential designers of our era in Apple (2020). In October 2019, Gursky’s portrait Sir Jonathan Ive (2019) was unveiled at the National Portrait Gallery, London, showing the Apple designer in the company’s new headquarters, which was designed by Foster + Partners in close cooperation with Ive. Apple (2020), photographed at the exact same spot, features iPhones and various generations of computers where the designer stood in the earlier photograph, but placed on pedestals and lined up along the curved window as if in a museum. In sharp contrast to the functional, minimalist architecture of Bauhaus and the sleek design of Apple, Pigs I (2020) portrays the animals in a rustic and seemingly organic habitation, yet as the presence of the cylindrical hale bales suggests, a space equally as artificial as the Apple HQ.

Details
Andreas Gursky – Andreas Gursky – Berlin

Andreas Gursky
Apple, 2020
Inkjet-print, Diasec
307 × 235.7 × 6.2 cm (framed)
120 7/8 × 92 7/8 × 2 3/8 inches (framed)

Andreas Gursky
Apple, 2020
Inkjet-print, Diasec
307 × 235.7 × 6.2 cm (framed)
120 7/8 × 92 7/8 × 2 3/8 inches (framed)

Andreas Gursky – Andreas Gursky – Berlin
Andreas Gursky – Andreas Gursky – Berlin

Andreas Gursky
Apple, 2020 (detail)

Andreas Gursky
Apple, 2020 (detail)

Andreas Gursky – Andreas Gursky – Berlin
Andreas Gursky – Andreas Gursky – Berlin

Andreas Gursky
Apple, 2020 (detail)

Andreas Gursky
Apple, 2020 (detail)

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If the Bauhaus school left a legacy we can still see today in our urban landscape, Gursky takes up one of the most influential designers of our era in Apple (2020). In October 2019, Gursky’s portrait Sir Jonathan Ive (2019) was unveiled at the National Portrait Gallery, London, showing the Apple designer in the company’s new headquarters, which was designed by Foster + Partners in close cooperation with Ive. Apple (2020), photographed at the exact same spot, features iPhones and various generations of computers where the designer stood in the earlier photograph, but placed on pedestals and lined up along the curved window as if in a museum. In sharp contrast to the functional, minimalist architecture of Bauhaus and the sleek design of Apple, Pigs I (2020) portrays the animals in a rustic and seemingly organic habitation, yet as the presence of the cylindrical hale bales suggests, a space equally as artificial as the Apple HQ.

Andreas Gursky – Andreas Gursky – Berlin

Andreas Gursky
Schweine I (Pigs I), 2020
C-print, behind glass
Motiv: 121 × 150 cm
Platte: 126.8 × 155.6 cm
motif: 47 5/8 × 59 inches
plate: 50 × 61 1/4 inches

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Andreas Gursky – Andreas Gursky – Berlin

Andreas Gursky
Schweine I (Pigs I), 2020
C-print, behind glass
Motiv: 121 × 150 cm
Platte: 126.8 × 155.6 cm
motif: 47 5/8 × 59 inches
plate: 50 × 61 1/4 inches

Andreas Gursky
Schweine I (Pigs I), 2020
C-print, behind glass
Motiv: 121 × 150 cm
Platte: 126.8 × 155.6 cm
motif: 47 5/8 × 59 inches
plate: 50 × 61 1/4 inches

Andreas Gursky – Andreas Gursky – Berlin
Andreas Gursky – Andreas Gursky – Berlin

Andreas Gursky
Schweine I (Pigs I), 2020 (detail)

Andreas Gursky
Schweine I (Pigs I), 2020 (detail)

Andreas Gursky – Andreas Gursky – Berlin
Andreas Gursky – Andreas Gursky – Berlin

Andreas Gursky
Schweine I (Pigs I), 2020 (detail)

Andreas Gursky
Schweine I (Pigs I), 2020 (detail)

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Andreas Gursky – Andreas Gursky – Berlin

Andreas Gursky
Installation view, Sprüth Magers, Berlin, September 12–November 14, 2020, Photo: timoohler

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Andreas Gursky – Andreas Gursky – Berlin

Andreas Gursky
Installation view, Sprüth Magers, Berlin, September 12–November 14, 2020, Photo: timoohler

Andreas Gursky
Installation view, Sprüth Magers, Berlin, September 12–November 14, 2020, Photo: timoohler

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In the adjacent space, Politik II (2020) directly follows Gursky’s work Rückblick (2015), to create a new series that looks at political structures. Over a period of several months, Gursky closely observed the activities of the members of parliament in the German Bundestag. Politik II features thirteen politicians in animated conversations, the figures filling the entire width of the picture. The fact that only one person stands aside, looking into a newspaper, magnifies the echoes between Gursky’s picture and a typical depiction of the Last Supper. While the humor is subtle in Rückblick—as expressed, for example, in the plume of smoke above Helmut Schmidt as an identifying feature of the former chancellor, the humor is bolder in Politik II. Who takes on the role of the savior in this implied depiction of the Last Supper—is it Angela Merkel, who has moved slightly out of the center of the picture, or Anton Hofreiter, whose shoulder-length hair alone seems to qualify him? Both pictures also include artworks in the backdrop: Politik II features Ed Ruscha’s Five Past Eleven (1989), while the politicians in Rückblick are framed by Barnett Newman’s modernist masterpiece, Vir Heroicus Sublimis (1950–51).

 

Andreas Gursky – Andreas Gursky – Berlin

Andreas Gursky
Politik II (Politics II), 2020
Inkjet-print, Diasec
217.4 × 402.4 × 6.2 cm (framed)
85 5/8 × 158 3/8 × 2 3/8 inches (framed)

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Andreas Gursky – Andreas Gursky – Berlin

Andreas Gursky
Review, 2015
Inkjet-Print, Diasec
242 × 477 × 6.5 cm (framed)
95 1/4 × 187 7/8 × 2 5/8 inches (framed)

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Details
Andreas Gursky – Andreas Gursky – Berlin

Andreas Gursky
Politik II (Politics II), 2020
Inkjet-print, Diasec
217.4 × 402.4 × 6.2 cm (framed)
85 5/8 × 158 3/8 × 2 3/8 inches (framed)

Andreas Gursky
Politik II (Politics II), 2020
Inkjet-print, Diasec
217.4 × 402.4 × 6.2 cm (framed)
85 5/8 × 158 3/8 × 2 3/8 inches (framed)

Andreas Gursky – Andreas Gursky – Berlin
Andreas Gursky – Andreas Gursky – Berlin

Andreas Gursky
Politik II (Politics II), 2020 (detail)

Andreas Gursky
Politik II (Politics II), 2020 (detail)

Andreas Gursky – Andreas Gursky – Berlin
Andreas Gursky – Andreas Gursky – Berlin

Andreas Gursky
Politik II (Politics II), 2020 (detail)

Andreas Gursky
Politik II (Politics II), 2020 (detail)

Andreas Gursky – Andreas Gursky – Berlin

Andreas Gursky
Review, 2015
Inkjet-Print, Diasec
242 × 477 × 6.5 cm (framed)
95 1/4 × 187 7/8 × 2 5/8 inches (framed)

Andreas Gursky
Review, 2015
Inkjet-Print, Diasec
242 × 477 × 6.5 cm (framed)
95 1/4 × 187 7/8 × 2 5/8 inches (framed)

Andreas Gursky – Andreas Gursky – Berlin
Andreas Gursky – Andreas Gursky – Berlin

Andreas Gursky
Review, 2015 (detail)

Andreas Gursky
Review, 2015 (detail)

Andreas Gursky – Andreas Gursky – Berlin
Andreas Gursky – Andreas Gursky – Berlin

Andreas Gursky
Review, 2015 (detail)

Andreas Gursky
Review, 2015 (detail)

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Andreas Gursky – Andreas Gursky – Berlin

Andreas Gursky
A und E, 2020
Inkjet-print, behind glass
76.9 × 61.2 × 4 cm (framed)
30 1/4 × 24 × 1 5/8 inches (framed)

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In the smaller gallery hangs a group of pictures that together look at how a photograph can address themes of time, texture and intimacy. A und E (2020) is the private portrait of a woman and her newborn baby in soft, ambient light. Königsbergerstrasse, diptych (2020) has a similarly intimate, if playful, mood: A woman in a modest domestic space stretches to place a wooden block atop a precarious construction, seemingly the climactic end of a game. The diptych builds a tension around the potential for a photograph to capture narrative or movement.

Details
Andreas Gursky – Andreas Gursky – Berlin

Andreas Gursky
A und E, 2020
Inkjet-print, behind glass
76.9 × 61.2 × 4 cm (framed)
30 1/4 × 24 × 1 5/8 inches (framed)

Andreas Gursky – Andreas Gursky – Berlin
Andreas Gursky – Andreas Gursky – Berlin

Andreas Gursky
A und E, 2020 (detail)

Andreas Gursky
A und E, 2020 (detail)

Andreas Gursky – Andreas Gursky – Berlin
Andreas Gursky – Andreas Gursky – Berlin

Andreas Gursky
A und E, 2020 (detail)

Andreas Gursky
A und E, 2020 (detail)

Details
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In the smaller gallery hangs a group of pictures that together look at how a photograph can address themes of time, texture and intimacy. A und E (2020) is the private portrait of a woman and her newborn baby in soft, ambient light. Königsbergerstrasse, diptych (2020) has a similarly intimate, if playful, mood: A woman in a modest domestic space stretches to place a wooden block atop a precarious construction, seemingly the climactic end of a game. The diptych builds a tension around the potential for a photograph to capture narrative or movement.

Andreas Gursky – Andreas Gursky – Berlin

Andreas Gursky
Königsbergerstrasse, diptych, 2020
Inkjet-print, behind glass
each 76.9 × 62.9 × 4 cm (framed)
each 30 1/4 × 24 3/4 × 1 5/8 inches (framed)

More Views
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Andreas Gursky – Andreas Gursky – Berlin

Andreas Gursky
Königsbergerstrasse, diptych, 2020
Inkjet-print, behind glass
each 76.9 × 62.9 × 4 cm (framed)
each 30 1/4 × 24 3/4 × 1 5/8 inches (framed)

Andreas Gursky
Königsbergerstrasse, diptych, 2020
Inkjet-print, behind glass
each 76.9 × 62.9 × 4 cm (framed)
each 30 1/4 × 24 3/4 × 1 5/8 inches (framed)

Andreas Gursky – Andreas Gursky – Berlin
Andreas Gursky – Andreas Gursky – Berlin

Andreas Gursky
Königsbergerstrasse, diptych, 2020 (detail)

Andreas Gursky
Königsbergerstrasse, diptych, 2020 (detail)

Andreas Gursky – Andreas Gursky – Berlin
Andreas Gursky – Andreas Gursky – Berlin

Andreas Gursky
Königsbergerstrasse, diptych, 2020 (detail)

Andreas Gursky
Königsbergerstrasse, diptych, 2020 (detail)

Andreas Gursky – Andreas Gursky – Berlin
Andreas Gursky – Andreas Gursky – Berlin

Andreas Gursky
Königsbergerstrasse, diptych, 2020 (detail)

Andreas Gursky
Königsbergerstrasse, diptych, 2020 (detail)

Andreas Gursky – Andreas Gursky – Berlin
Andreas Gursky – Andreas Gursky – Berlin

Andreas Gursky
Königsbergerstrasse, diptych, 2020 (detail)

Andreas Gursky
Königsbergerstrasse, diptych, 2020 (detail)

Andreas Gursky – Andreas Gursky – Berlin
Andreas Gursky – Andreas Gursky – Berlin

Andreas Gursky
Königsbergerstrasse, diptych, 2020 (detail)

Andreas Gursky
Königsbergerstrasse, diptych, 2020 (detail)

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Andreas Gursky – Andreas Gursky – Berlin

Andreas Gursky
Installation view, Sprüth Magers, Berlin, September 12–November 14, 2020, Photo: Timo Ohler

Andreas Gursky – Andreas Gursky – Berlin

Andreas Gursky
Tokyo, 2017
Inkjet-print, Diasec
Size of image: 216 × 394 cm
Size of image: 85 × 155 1/8 inches

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Andreas Gursky – Andreas Gursky – Berlin

Andreas Gursky
Utah, 2017
Inkjet-print, Diasec
Size of image: 205 × 437 cm
Size of image: 80 3/4 × 172 inches

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Details
Andreas Gursky – Andreas Gursky – Berlin

Andreas Gursky
Installation view, Sprüth Magers, Berlin, September 12–November 14, 2020, Photo: Timo Ohler

Andreas Gursky – Andreas Gursky – Berlin

Andreas Gursky
Tokyo, 2017
Inkjet-print, Diasec
Size of image: 216 × 394 cm
Size of image: 85 × 155 1/8 inches

Andreas Gursky
Tokyo, 2017
Inkjet-print, Diasec
Size of image: 216 × 394 cm
Size of image: 85 × 155 1/8 inches

Andreas Gursky – Andreas Gursky – Berlin
Andreas Gursky – Andreas Gursky – Berlin

Andreas Gursky
Tokyo, 2017 (detail)

Andreas Gursky
Tokyo, 2017 (detail)

Andreas Gursky – Andreas Gursky – Berlin
Andreas Gursky – Andreas Gursky – Berlin

Andreas Gursky
Tokyo, 2017 (detail)

Andreas Gursky
Tokyo, 2017 (detail)

Andreas Gursky – Andreas Gursky – Berlin
Andreas Gursky – Andreas Gursky – Berlin

Andreas Gursky
Tokyo, 2017 (detail)

Andreas Gursky
Tokyo, 2017 (detail)

Andreas Gursky – Andreas Gursky – Berlin
Andreas Gursky – Andreas Gursky – Berlin

Andreas Gursky
Tokyo, 2017 (detail)

Andreas Gursky
Tokyo, 2017 (detail)

Andreas Gursky – Andreas Gursky – Berlin

Andreas Gursky
Utah, 2017
Inkjet-print, Diasec
Size of image: 205 × 437 cm
Size of image: 80 3/4 × 172 inches

Andreas Gursky
Utah, 2017
Inkjet-print, Diasec
Size of image: 205 × 437 cm
Size of image: 80 3/4 × 172 inches

Andreas Gursky – Andreas Gursky – Berlin
Andreas Gursky – Andreas Gursky – Berlin

Andreas Gursky
Utah, 2017 (detail)

Andreas Gursky
Utah, 2017 (detail)

Andreas Gursky – Andreas Gursky – Berlin
Andreas Gursky – Andreas Gursky – Berlin

Andreas Gursky
Utah, 2017 (detail)

Andreas Gursky
Utah, 2017 (detail)

Andreas Gursky – Andreas Gursky – Berlin
Andreas Gursky – Andreas Gursky – Berlin

Andreas Gursky
Utah, 2017 (detail)

Andreas Gursky
Utah, 2017 (detail)

Andreas Gursky – Andreas Gursky – Berlin
Andreas Gursky – Andreas Gursky – Berlin

Andreas Gursky
Utah, 2017 (detail)

Andreas Gursky
Utah, 2017 (detail)

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Andreas Gursky – Andreas Gursky – Berlin

Andreas Gursky
Untitled XXIII, 2020
Inkjet-print, behind glass
76.9 × 62.9 × 4 cm (framed)
30 1/4 × 24 3/4 × 1 5/8 inches (framed)

More Views

Tokyo and Utah (both 2017) capture landscapes from the perspective of a camera in motion—Tokyo from a train, Utah from a car. While the blur evokes movement, it also brings a painterly texture to the surface of the photograph. 
 
Similarly, Untitled XXIII (2020), hanging at the entrance to the upstairs gallery, has a warm, blurred texture. The photograph seems to depict an everyday box or shipping container, yet the painterly surface, at once reminiscent of an antique painting or an under lit smartphone snap, gives the picture a haunted look. 

 

Utah, Tokyo and Königsbergerstrasse, diptych (2020) all feature in our online exhibition, Space is Time.

Details
Andreas Gursky – Andreas Gursky – Berlin

Andreas Gursky
Untitled XXIII, 2020
Inkjet-print, behind glass
76.9 × 62.9 × 4 cm (framed)
30 1/4 × 24 3/4 × 1 5/8 inches (framed)

Andreas Gursky
Untitled XXIII, 2020
Inkjet-print, behind glass
76.9 × 62.9 × 4 cm (framed)
30 1/4 × 24 3/4 × 1 5/8 inches (framed)

Andreas Gursky – Andreas Gursky – Berlin
Andreas Gursky – Andreas Gursky – Berlin

Andreas Gursky
Untitled XXIII, 2020 (detail)

Andreas Gursky
Untitled XXIII, 2020 (detail)

Andreas Gursky – Andreas Gursky – Berlin
Andreas Gursky – Andreas Gursky – Berlin

Andreas Gursky
Untitled XXIII, 2020 (detail)

Andreas Gursky
Untitled XXIII, 2020 (detail)

Details
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Tokyo and Utah (both 2017) capture landscapes from the perspective of a camera in motion—Tokyo from a train, Utah from a car. While the blur evokes movement, it also brings a painterly texture to the surface of the photograph. 
 
Similarly, Untitled XXIII (2020), hanging at the entrance to the upstairs gallery, has a warm, blurred texture. The photograph seems to depict an everyday box or shipping container, yet the painterly surface, at once reminiscent of an antique painting or an under lit smartphone snap, gives the picture a haunted look. 

 

Utah, Tokyo and Königsbergerstrasse, diptych (2020) all feature in our online exhibition, Space is Time.

Andreas Gursky – Andreas Gursky – Berlin

Photo: Timo Ohler

 

The upper floor of the gallery is devoted to three new pictures of The Hong Kong Bank, Sir Norman Foster’s iconic high-rise. While his first photograph of the subject, Hong Kong, Shanghai Bank (1994), expressed the optimism and transparency of modernism, each of the three new works portray the building in a different light. In Hong Kong, Shanghai Bank I (2020) a red-orange diode curtain obscures the windows, a screen against prying eyes. In Hong Kong Shanghai Bank II (2020), the façade seems to reflect the current events in front of the bank: A sea of colorful umbrellas, a reference to the 2014 Umbrella Movement. Words in horizontal bands stretch across the façade of the building in Hong Kong Shanghai Bank III (2020). Highlighting everything from cultural figures to political flashpoints, the words invite the reader to reflect on the powerful structures that filter our interpretation of historical events. 
 
In the space outside the upper floor gallery, the diptych Pigs II (2020) revisits the same setting as Pigs I, where the animals sprawl contentedly in lush beds of golden hay. Placing himself at eye level in an immaculately maintained organic pig farm in southern Germany, Gursky raises issues about the sustainable and ethical breeding of animals for human consumption. The image of cosseted pigs offers a contrast to the stark workplaces depicted in the Hong Kong Shanghai Bank pictures, as well as images of intensive farming explored in previous works such as Greeley (2002) and Fukuyama (2004).  

Andreas Gursky – Andreas Gursky – Berlin

Andreas Gursky
Hong Kong Shanghai Bank I, 2020
Inkjet-print, Diasec
307 × 205.7 × 6.2 cm (framed)
120 7/8 × 81 × 2 3/8 inches (framed)

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Andreas Gursky – Andreas Gursky – Berlin

Andreas Gursky
Hong Kong Shanghai Bank II, 2020
Inkjet-print, Diasec
307 × 205.7 × 6.2 cm (framed)
120 7/8 × 81 × 2 3/8 inches (framed)

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Andreas Gursky – Andreas Gursky – Berlin

Andreas Gursky
Hong Kong Shanghai Bank III, 2020
Inkjet-print, Diasec
307 × 205.7 × 6.2 cm (framed)
120 7/8 × 81 × 2 3/8 inches (framed)

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Andreas Gursky – Andreas Gursky – Berlin

Andreas Gursky
Hong Kong Shanghai Bank I, 2020
Inkjet-print, Diasec
307 × 205.7 × 6.2 cm (framed)
120 7/8 × 81 × 2 3/8 inches (framed)

Andreas Gursky
Hong Kong Shanghai Bank I, 2020
Inkjet-print, Diasec
307 × 205.7 × 6.2 cm (framed)
120 7/8 × 81 × 2 3/8 inches (framed)

Andreas Gursky – Andreas Gursky – Berlin
Andreas Gursky – Andreas Gursky – Berlin

Andreas Gursky
Hong Kong Shanghai Bank I, 2020 (detail)

Andreas Gursky
Hong Kong Shanghai Bank I, 2020 (detail)

Andreas Gursky – Andreas Gursky – Berlin
Andreas Gursky – Andreas Gursky – Berlin

Andreas Gursky
Hong Kong Shanghai Bank I, 2020 (detail)

Andreas Gursky
Hong Kong Shanghai Bank I, 2020 (detail)

Andreas Gursky – Andreas Gursky – Berlin

Andreas Gursky
Hong Kong Shanghai Bank II, 2020
Inkjet-print, Diasec
307 × 205.7 × 6.2 cm (framed)
120 7/8 × 81 × 2 3/8 inches (framed)

Andreas Gursky
Hong Kong Shanghai Bank II, 2020
Inkjet-print, Diasec
307 × 205.7 × 6.2 cm (framed)
120 7/8 × 81 × 2 3/8 inches (framed)

Andreas Gursky – Andreas Gursky – Berlin
Andreas Gursky – Andreas Gursky – Berlin

Andreas Gursky
Hong Kong Shanghai Bank II, 2020 (detail)

Andreas Gursky
Hong Kong Shanghai Bank II, 2020 (detail)

Andreas Gursky – Andreas Gursky – Berlin
Andreas Gursky – Andreas Gursky – Berlin

Andreas Gursky
Hong Kong Shanghai Bank II, 2020 (detail)

Andreas Gursky
Hong Kong Shanghai Bank II, 2020 (detail)

Andreas Gursky – Andreas Gursky – Berlin

Andreas Gursky
Hong Kong Shanghai Bank III, 2020
Inkjet-print, Diasec
307 × 205.7 × 6.2 cm (framed)
120 7/8 × 81 × 2 3/8 inches (framed)

Andreas Gursky
Hong Kong Shanghai Bank III, 2020
Inkjet-print, Diasec
307 × 205.7 × 6.2 cm (framed)
120 7/8 × 81 × 2 3/8 inches (framed)

Andreas Gursky – Andreas Gursky – Berlin
Andreas Gursky – Andreas Gursky – Berlin

Andreas Gursky
Hong Kong Shanghai Bank III, 2020 (detail)

Andreas Gursky
Hong Kong Shanghai Bank III, 2020 (detail)

Andreas Gursky – Andreas Gursky – Berlin
Andreas Gursky – Andreas Gursky – Berlin

Andreas Gursky
Hong Kong Shanghai Bank III, 2020 (detail)

Andreas Gursky
Hong Kong Shanghai Bank III, 2020 (detail)

Details
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The upper floor of the gallery is devoted to three new pictures of The Hong Kong Bank, Sir Norman Foster’s iconic high-rise. While his first photograph of the subject, Hong Kong, Shanghai Bank (1994), expressed the optimism and transparency of modernism, each of the three new works portray the building in a different light. In Hong Kong, Shanghai Bank I (2020) a red-orange diode curtain obscures the windows, a screen against prying eyes. In Hong Kong Shanghai Bank II (2020), the façade seems to reflect the current events in front of the bank: A sea of colorful umbrellas, a reference to the 2014 Umbrella Movement. Words in horizontal bands stretch across the façade of the building in Hong Kong Shanghai Bank III (2020). Highlighting everything from cultural figures to political flashpoints, the words invite the reader to reflect on the powerful structures that filter our interpretation of historical events. 
 
In the space outside the upper floor gallery, the diptych Pigs II (2020) revisits the same setting as Pigs I, where the animals sprawl contentedly in lush beds of golden hay. Placing himself at eye level in an immaculately maintained organic pig farm in southern Germany, Gursky raises issues about the sustainable and ethical breeding of animals for human consumption. The image of cosseted pigs offers a contrast to the stark workplaces depicted in the Hong Kong Shanghai Bank pictures, as well as images of intensive farming explored in previous works such as Greeley (2002) and Fukuyama (2004).  

Andreas Gursky – Andreas Gursky – Berlin

Andreas Gursky
Schweine II (Pigs II, diptych), 2020
C-print, behind glass
each 106.9 × 122.4 × 4.9 cm (framed)
each 42 × 48 1/8 × 2 inches (framed)

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Andreas Gursky – Andreas Gursky – Berlin

Andreas Gursky
Schweine II (Pigs II, diptych), 2020
C-print, behind glass
each 106.9 × 122.4 × 4.9 cm (framed)
each 42 × 48 1/8 × 2 inches (framed)

Andreas Gursky
Schweine II (Pigs II, diptych), 2020
C-print, behind glass
each 106.9 × 122.4 × 4.9 cm (framed)
each 42 × 48 1/8 × 2 inches (framed)

Andreas Gursky – Andreas Gursky – Berlin
Andreas Gursky – Andreas Gursky – Berlin

Andreas Gursky
Pigs II, diptych, 2020 (detail)

Andreas Gursky
Pigs II, diptych, 2020 (detail)

Andreas Gursky – Andreas Gursky – Berlin
Andreas Gursky – Andreas Gursky – Berlin

Andreas Gursky
Pigs II, diptych, 2020 (detail)

Andreas Gursky
Pigs II, diptych, 2020 (detail)

Andreas Gursky – Andreas Gursky – Berlin
Andreas Gursky – Andreas Gursky – Berlin

Andreas Gursky
Schweine II (Pigs II, diptych), 2020 (detail)

Andreas Gursky
Schweine II (Pigs II, diptych), 2020 (detail)

Andreas Gursky – Andreas Gursky – Berlin
Andreas Gursky – Andreas Gursky – Berlin

Andreas Gursky
Schweine II (Pigs II, diptych), 2020 (detail)

Andreas Gursky
Schweine II (Pigs II, diptych), 2020 (detail)

Andreas Gursky – Andreas Gursky – Berlin
Andreas Gursky – Andreas Gursky – Berlin

Andreas Gursky
Schweine II (Pigs II, diptych), 2020 (detail)

Andreas Gursky
Schweine II (Pigs II, diptych), 2020 (detail)

Details
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Video production: Carolin Röckelein / Soundtrack and voiceover: Erin Lang